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9

If you really think someone is going to use your book as a how-to, then write a preface which is a single large, comprehensive disclaimer. Put all the "don't do this at home" copy there, and if it's an e-book, throw in the occasional link back to it. (Also, don't publish genuine secrets, and you may want to have the number of a good lawyer on hand as a ...


7

Be very careful. Just because 'everyone knows' something doesn't mean that it's actually true, or that there's enough evidence for you to convince a judge that it's true when you get sued for libel. If you're going to write something that could be seen as an attack against someone, make sure you have all your evidence to hand before you do so, and make sure ...


7

has anyone seen a similar situation which helps shed light on this grey area? I have in front of me two publications: Common LISP: The Language, by Guy Steele (et al.) and published by Digital Press, and Common LISP: The Index, by Rosemary Simpson and published by Coral Software Corp and Franz Inc. Both were published in the US in the 1980s. I was ...


6

Your contract should spell out what, if any, rights you have to use the cover art and/or book excerpts for promotional purposes. Typically, smaller or independent presses will be more than happy to add in those rights during negotiation since they will typically have a much smaller budget for promotion and will rely on the author to do much of the ...


6

In brief: Yes. But: If you make a direct (word-for-word) copy of a news story, then you'll be in breach of copyright. If you write a story with characters in it who are clearly based on specific living people then you (or your publishers) risk being sued for libel by those people if they think that your story disparages them unfairly. That's the ...


5

In general, your characters will be assumed to be fictional, unless you give overwhelming reason for them to be considered otherwise. Which means that you're asking the wrong question. There's no one twist which will make a borrowed character untouchable in his "disguise"; there are only ways that you, the author, can expose that the character is borrowed. ...


5

To answer this question, I inquired with the American Society for Indexing. I asked: Is it legal to create an index of a book and publish that index, without consulting the autor or publisher of that book? I received the following answer: According to US copyright law, copyright in an index exists separately from the original work that is being ...


4

If your index doesn't contain any of the original work's text, I fail to see how it could be considered copyright infringement. Since it can't be used without the original text, it's not infringing on the author's ability to make a living off their work. Possibly even the contrary.


4

Neither of those things will really do anything to provide you with any protection in a court of law. As far as a "low-budget" copyright method, the only thing you need to do is add the following line to the bottom of your manuscript: Copyright 2015, Author Name It's just as simple as that. Make sure that you have a copy for yourself before you send it ...


4

You really should be asking a lawyer rather than a group of writers. I am not a lawyer, but my understanding is that for something to be "libel": (a) It must be written or printed, i.e. not simply spoken (that's "slander"). (b) It must be about a "clearly identifiable person". (c) It must be false -- truth is an absolute defense against libel. (d) If it is ...


4

I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. First, check any license terms that accompany Company S's documentation. They might have published it with the intention that other vendors will incorporate it (e.g. some Apache platforms), or they might not intend that but allow it under their license (e.g. Stack Exchange, or anything else that uses the ...


3

In the U.S., anyone can sue anyone. That doesn't mean they win, and you can counter-sue for your damages incurred defending against a baseless lawsuit. Plus, of course, most celebs wouldn't want to be seen as bullies. Stick to the facts and you will be fine. However, start injecting your opinions in there, and you could get into trouble. This is ...


3

Only people can be libelled or slandered. Places cannot. Provided that you do not write in a way whereby specific public officials could make a case that you are attacking their personal behaviour and reputations, then whatever you think about a place is your own business. In most western-type jurisdictions, the dead cannot be libelled (that is certainly ...


3

I am not a lawyer. But according to copyright.gov, in the US, once you create a work, you have copyright protection. But you can register your copyright for added protection. When is my work protected? Your work is under copyright protection the moment it is created and fixed in a tangible form that it is perceptible either directly or with the aid ...


3

There are traditionally three active defenses against charges of libel, slander or defamation. Yes, it is mean and nasty but it is true. (I called her a ^bad-word^ and she is, see here is the proof.) The standards of evidence is lower in this case, it only needs to be compelling not preponderance there of. Well it is not true, but it is nice. (As far as I ...


3

Note: Not a legal expert If you based a character in a historical novel on a real person from the present, it would take a fair amount of concerted effort for anyone to even notice, and even if that character had distinctive traits or speech patterns linked to the real person, one could make a good case that it was usage for satire. No reasonable person ...


3

Japan's press appears to work differently than ours. According to an article in the German newspaper Die Tageszeitung, in Japan there are 800 press clubs which reside directly in offices in the ministries, industrial companies and so on, about which they report. Only the largest newspapers and tv stations have access to these press clubs. The accredited ...


3

Ultimately it comes down to the type of story that you are writing and how you go about writing it. For example, if you are writing a book based on a historical event, you can usually get by with just classifying it as a historical novel or historical fiction based on real events. Most readers will immediately recognize what this means and will not hold you ...


3

After consulting the Meta question about answering legal questions, I've decided to post what I've found regarding libel in fiction. I am not a lawyer. I am summarizing from this blog post supposedly written by a lawyer, but the disclaimer at the end is maybe the most important thing to note: Libel law is fact specific. Further, [there] is no single ...


2

Invert the sentence to parse it. The worker first must engage the wedge for separating connector A and connector B. In that sentence, "the wedge for separating" becomes an adjective phrase. That means there's a wedge for separating but there's also a wedge for cutting, meaning it's another of the same object but it does a different task. I don't ...


2

I'm not quite sure what you're asking. Do you mean, Can I legally put some words on the cover of my book that say that the material is not suitable for children? I'm not a lawyer, but I'd be surprised if there's any country in the world that says you are not allowed to do that. I can't imagine someone saying, "It's okay to publish a book with this highly ...


2

Well, I'm a great believer in a very broad interpretation of freedom of speech. But surely even the most extreme advocates of freedom of speech would not say that it means you have the right to say absolutely anything that you want about anyone with no fear of consequences. Like if you said on the witness stand in court that you saw Mr Jones commit the ...


2

What you're looking at here is a fair use scenario (I'm assuming that you're in the US, other countries have different laws). In short you're covered, assuming that you're using a small portion of the work for non-profit education use. What small means is up to the courts to decide but in general, if it's a couple percent of the total work then you're OK ...


2

FYI, I am not lawyer and I don’t know the background behind the book which I am about to show you. I just want to let you know, that something similar was already done. Take look at book Inside Steve's brain by Leander Kahney. it is mixture of Apple history and author's opinions about why Apple was so popular, with added business how-to (How to make another ...


2

(I am not a lawyer.) If you are writing an unauthorized biography of a celebrity, I imagine that falls under journalism and libel rules. So as long as you could cite every source you used, and you did not write anything which is demonstrably false, you would probably be okay. You are describing what's basically an extended case study or an academic thesis. ...


2

I, too, am not a lawyer, so cannot give you advice. I can, however, tell you how I think I would act in your circumstances, as I understand them. My understanding of copyright protection is that it does not protect every word or line in a work; it protects only significant portions of a work. As such, I can quote a work verbatim without compensating the ...


2

It's done often enough. I can think of books and stories with titles that come from poems, Bible quotes, etc. Like Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises" is a quote from Ecclesiastes, and there's a fairly well-known science fiction story called "By the Waters of Babylon", also a Bible quote. There's a story by Heinlein called "And he Built a Crooked House", which ...


2

As a workbook I can see this methodology working. Since you do not plagiarize the original works, you cite them, and refer the reader to them, I am not aware of any laws which would be in conflict (note: I am a US citizen and laws in other countries are something I know absolutely nothing about). If this were a textbook, as a student I would question ...


2

Typically, "no". Not unless there's a contract or license that allows it. The cover was commissioned and paid for by the publisher. However, non-deceptive use for the purpose of selling more books would probably be happily approved by the publisher.


2

As a rule using excerpts for critical or explanatory purposes is fair use. As long as the excerpts are fragmentary and clearly essential to your criticism you should be on solid ground. The main thing to avoid would be copying large or complete sections of the web sites or copying things which are irrelevant to your own material.



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