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After consulting the Meta question about answering legal questions, I've decided to post what I've found regarding libel in fiction. I am not a lawyer. I am summarizing from this blog post supposedly written by a lawyer, but the disclaimer at the end is maybe the most important thing to note: Libel law is fact specific. Further, [there] is no single ...


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In both of the examples you gave, I would assume that there is some level of public knowledge or information that has already been shared publicly. As a result, there would be no reason for you to not be able to write about it. One way to help you answer your own question is to ask yourself how you came to know about it. If you read about it online or ...


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If the item is a legitimate experiment from the military and it's not public knowledge (e.g. you have security clearances with access to that info), I would most definitely ask a lawyer, but my gut says no. If it is public knowledge, then pretty much anything is fair game, especially if you're writing fiction. Though to ease your mind, you may still want to ...


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I am not a lawyer, so this is from a writer's, not legal point of view. As it were, anyone can sue anybody for anything at any time. So the issue is, how have people minimized the possibility of this happening (and worse, losing) One form of "protection" that has been used by some authors and publishers is to slightly "misspell" the place in question. For ...


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In response to Question 2: Likelihood implies a question of probability; rather than probability, you may wish to consider the possibility of legal ramifications. One possible legal ramification is your written statements being entered into evidence under one of the exceptions to the Rule Against Hearsay (Admission by Party Opponent, or Prior ...



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