Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

36

For longer pieces, especially those with figures, tables, contents, or internal references, or citations. For shorter pieces (such as an essay) I'd do it in Word or OpenOffice, since I normally don't need the power of Latex and getting it laid out properly won't involve much work. Any writing of decent size, I use latex because: 1) I only worry about ...


12

Yes. I write everything in Vim with LaTeX, using the sffms package. As the name indicates, the sffms package was written for SF, but manuscript style is pretty much universal. I highly recommend it.


10

Any text-based "markup" format -- LaTeX, HTML, various XML schemas like DocBook, etc -- will serve you better than binary formats like Word, Pages, FrameMaker, etc. (I am aware that some of these tools export XML or SGML.) The reasons include: Decoupling from editors. You can use your favorite tool to edit any of these, which gives you more flexibility. ...


7

The answer depends a lot on what you have around you and what your needs are; assuming that You don't have extensive needs beyond Latin-1 and Math character sets, or simple use of Unicode character sets You don't have a need for overly-rich or complex page layouts (i.e. you're not doing page layouts that you'd see in a glossy magazine) You don't have ...


6

It seems there a significant bias in the responses - people who do use are much more likely to care about this question than people who don't. I only use TeX when I'm writing something with lots of equations or figures (I'm a physics student/teacher, so I do that sometimes). Otherwise a word processor is easier for me.


5

Yes. I want my work look as good as possible and I've yet to find anything that even comes close to TeX. HTML is nice but printing it ...


4

I use it, but mainly because I hate Word. It's a little tricky to get started in, but in the long run you'll be happier. It's much easier to make things look professional, and there is no fighting with the stupid program.


4

I'm a huge fan of LaTeX. Though I usually write in something ultra-minimalist (markdown syntax in pyroom lately), before actually showing it to anyone, I'll convert to LaTeX for better formatting control. I'm not sure that counts as "writing in" TeX or LaTeX -- I find anything other than a plain text editor too distracting to the "get this down on screen ...


4

As Viktor said, FrameMaker is probbly the best widely-used tool for doing what you're trying to do. Other considerations: DocBook is a spec, not a tool (as Viktor said). It is XML, so you can use any XML editor to write content. Possibilities include XML Notepad (free), XML Spy (used to be free, not now?), Oxygen ($), Epic ($$). (Personally I just use ...


4

For an understanding of some of the terms used in the answer (which is essentially quoting of sections from CMS), consider looking at this. For a quick answer: The Chicago Manual of Style (borrowed from here) has the following to say about pagination: Using arabic numerals, number the pages in the upper right corner. Do not number the title page but ...


4

If you're looking for a step up from Markdown but not as complex as LaTeX, take a look at MultiMarkdown. It's Markdown but with lots of extra features added and easy conversion to LaTeX, PDF or HTML. From the site: MultiMarkdown adds these features to the basic Markdown syntax: footnotes tables citations and bibliography (works best in LaTeX ...


4

I would guess that most editors want readable copies of text, so either a printed version or a common file format such as PDF or Word. You can create both from (La)TeX. Wether or not a publisher will appreciate a .tex file after the manuscript as been accepted for publication by the editor will depend on the publishing process. Format: Scientific journals ...


3

The fact that software offers certain possibilities of markup does not mean that you should use them. A good example is underlining. To my knowledge all software allows underlining of text; nevertheless underlining is not longer used in professional publications from newspapers to magazines to books since the demise of the typewriter. That said, indentation ...


3

LaTeX is fine as it will deliver a printable .pdf for initial approval to a publisher and many templates from scientific publishers, freely available from a basic web search can be loaded, including Springer and many others LaTeX templates Springer


3

I've been playing around with Scrivener (for Windows) for a few days now because of * ahem * Lauren Ipsum's almost evangelical zeal regarding the product ; I must admit I'm quite impressed with it so far, and am seriously considering using it permanently. Scrivener 2 does have a form of version control in the form of "Snapshots". I haven't used it as yet, ...


3

I love LaTex, but I do not use it anymore simply because every editor I know uses word. Every piece I have written has required multiple rounds of editing using Word's "Track Changes" feature. Sending editors a PDF and asking them to mark it up via text comments (e.g. "2nd graf: capitalize "John") slows down the entire editing process.


2

Look into Lyx. This is a GUI front end that puts out document files in various formats expecially Latex. You can create a DocBook format document by exporting as SGML and then converting it. See http://wiki.lyx.org/LyX/DocBook


2

No. La/TeX is a typesetting markup language. I wouldn't imagine ever actually writing in a TeX environment. However, there are obviously lots of people above who do! (I'm also voting to make this a CW since the answers are by natu highly subjective, unless someone cites an empirical study.)


2

If you're writing fiction, you're asking for trouble by using LaTeX. There are no real advantages to it, except perhaps that since it's only ASCII it will probably never fall into the same black hole as that .xyz file you created years ago in some word processor whose name you can't remember anymore. For technical writing, especially if it includes ...


2

I would still recommend latex. Its maintainable, I have edited ten year old documents.


1

No. I write books. The reading experience of a book comes not only from the abstract content of the text, but from its visual appearance as well. Text has a surface. When I write, I need to see the text as it will appear on the printed page, otherwise I am unable to compose its visual rhythm and structure.


1

It might sound very Silly, but the best thing you can do is to use the notepad with a different font, so that you like it. Formatting will be a big waste of time, and using conventional MS Word or others different than the usual notepad won't allow you to use version control . The best control version is through TXT files! After finishing your story, ...


1

If you are asking about writing tools, you might want to try Lyx. Lyx is a front-end to LaTex and for that reason is a writing tool rather than a typesetting tool. Scrivener is another writing tool, but it is proprietary. Scrivener supports Multimarkdown. While you may have read all over the web that LaTex is all about scientific and manual formulae, in the ...


1

Indentation will always depend on the style guide you're using, so you should always check that first. The following assumes Chicago rules. With regards, to paragraph indentation, see: Should I indent the first line of the first paragraph in a chapter? In addition to the indentation rules, you should also have no extra spaces separating your paragraphs. ...


1

What you're asking for is probably more suited to the TeX stack exchange; they've got a similar answer here, along with some template information. I think you'd be wise to look here before continuing. The nice thing about LaTeX, however, is that the plain-text nature of it makes it easier to modify existing templates to suit your needs. So, maybe the link ...


1

I've been using Celtx for writing screenplays, since it takes care of all of those messy formatting details. And it's free. I had to manually incorporate version control in my writing process, since it doesn't appear that Celtx is capable of version control at this time. I use mercurial for version control. Every time I commit changes to the repository, ...


1

You can use the @unpublished record in BiBTeX to reference an unpublished article/paper. And, although you can get a better answer at Tex.SE as Fran said, it is more specific to technical questions relating to TeX/LaTeX/XeLaTeX/etc. rather than writing style. Ultimately, how you cite the unpublished paper will depend on your field of study and/or what ...


1

Who are the participants? If you are giving it to a professional group- take a look at papers published by professionals in this group. THAT is what they will expect and appreciate. "We" hold others to the same "standards" we follow.


1

Matter of opinion and all that, but I prefer plain text with no formatting. Writing and typesetting are separate activities that are not relevant to each other. When you're writing a story your focus should be the characters and the story, not what font you're using or whether your chapter titles should be centered. If you get wrapped up in text formatting ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible