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7

Just look how real life slangs form, there are some common patterns. To name a few: Portmanteaus and clipping: fan fiction -> fanfic -> fic, software -> warez. Abbreviations and acronyms made into words: Product End of Life -> "they EOLed the product, we have to upgrade now". Complex concepts replaced with references: "if you get caught, they will 94 you" ...


6

One of the characteristics of the kind of prose you are referring to is a very dull and dry approach, there is often quite unnecessary pompous savant words and an obtuse language, there is also a general miasma of boredomness and triteness, a sure way to spot the culprits in an entirely wholesome and objective way is the length of the sentences used which ...


5

A good primer on stylistic conventions is Strunk and White's Elements of Style, at least for writing in US English. It follows a prescriptive convention, which may be helpful to beginning writers. It can apply to many different types of writing, including essays, stories and letters. At its base, it helps to develop a clear and concise style, which I believe ...


4

The original Tarzan book deals with this situation. His parents had several years' worth of picture and children's books, which they intended to use to educate him while they did whatever they were doing in Africa (which I forget) before they were marooned by pirates. [edit: Then they both died while Tarzan was still a baby.] So, yeah, they had a ...


4

I would say simply pick a really specific way to change the language, and then change it that way consistently. Like with your example, it uses words that rhyme with the word they mean in English, in order to essentially create a new language. Pig Latin takes the first part of a word in English, puts it at the end and adds "-ay" as a suffix. So I would ...


4

Sometimes purple prose is an attempt to impress the reader with how smart the author is. I work in the software business and I have to do a fair amount of technical writing. And I've very routinely found that if I write something that is simple, clear, and direct, someone else in the company will edit it to make it less easy to read. I recall one time that ...


3

Why does the message have to be in English? Messages that are meant to be understood across languages are usually encoded visually. Think of the pictograms used to direct people on airports, or the comic-book-like saftey instructions in the nets at the backs of airplane seats. Or think of making drinking gestures. If I wanted to communicate a message to ...


3

When used sparingly or in the right context, archaic language can be fun. I won't argue any literary position, but to answer the OP's question about services or rules, incase anyone (or a future visitor) is curious, this is what I found. Here are a few automated services : http://whilstr.org/ http://www.oldenglishtranslator.co.uk ...


2

I think the answer has to come from who your characters are, and why they are using slang. Essentially slang is an in-group word-game. It's a way of distinguishing insiders from outsiders. It can also be a low-key form of resistance to authority. So it depends on your group. Techie slang is filled with acronyms and shortenings. It's a way of showing ...


2

Joseph Conrad learned English in his twenties. Sources: wikipedia e-notes


2

I have seen books where the author prefaces the book by saying it's a translation of some other-worldly book, and then goes on to use real-world languages as a stand-in for the in-world languages. Tolkien did this to a minor degree when he used some more archaic English words for the Rohirrim, whose language was meant to be like an older form of the ...


2

There are some criteria for assessing the readability of texts, which give you a result corresponding to the school grade at which a child could easily comprehend the text - I.e. the most 'readable' text is the one which can be understood by the youngest children (limited vocabulary, simple structure). If you want your text to be maximally readable then go ...


2

You could use verlan. Words of this slang are made up by switching syllables of a word. It's not be the best method, but it can be a start.


1

What Dale said. And: I think that your novel should contain a short, biographical author's note including the URL of your webpage. On your webpage you can have either a page dedicated to your political views, or a blog where, besides other writerly blog posts, you voice your political opinion. I would keep the book as the book and not water it down with ...


1

Politics will limit your audience. If your novel is highly political, your author's note will fit right in. The author's note may even be a draw for people who agree with the politics. A political author's note up front will annoy many readers. Annoyed readers may close the book and not open it again. They may be annoyed with themselves for having spent ...


1

It seems to me that there is only way you can create "purple prose". The term itself seems less like an actual definition then words a pundit invented to describe something he recommends for or against. In this case, he is simply recommending that you avoid a certain type of prose that reads as boring. Is my interpretation at least. edit: to answer your ...


1

The main one I'm aware of is that King often uses which to introduce a restrictive clause. Grammatical purists reserve which for nonrestrictive ones, and introduce restrictive clauses with that.


1

I use this scale: all the characters sound like the author nice tight writing, some of the characters sound similar nothing needs added, nothing needs taken away rich, full characters; might be a little wordy wonderful dialog, where's the plot? Aim for three settle for two or four. Avoid one and five unless you want to prove that you are good enough to ...


1

I would agree with Mr. Shiny that the simplest way might be to say that they are speaking in their 'strange language,' and then just tell the reader what they said in English. For example: "I should think not," said the witch, still speaking in her strange tongue. If you do NOT want the reader to understand the witch, a made-up language would be ...


1

I largely agree with @dmm's answer and I upvoted it. Let me add: Depending on what you're trying to do with this story, you could make a significant portion of the story be the children's effort to decipher the message. They could find an artifact with the message on it, and figure out that those lines and scratches must be some sort of writing. Lots of ...


1

All German language forums for writers as well as most forums for fans and writers of specific literary genres have subforums where you can post your own work and receive critique. Use any search engine and search for either "Schriftsteller Forum" or "[your genre] Forum" (e.g. "Fantasy Forum"). A few examples: http://www.dsfo.de/ ...



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