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Τhis is a highly opinion seeking question and isn't suitable for an SE site. I'll try to respond with supporting facts. I am talking only about publishing e-books. Facts: Kindle is by far the easiest "commercial" platform to publish your book, with the least barriers to get your work out there. Kindle has reading devices and also apps for smartphones. This ...


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Social media. Get your friends to share it on Facebook. Link to it on Twitter. Make an Instagram post. Write a little review on Tumblr. Use enough hashtags that people will be able to find it and post during a time of day when more people are online. Get people to review it on Amazon.


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Almost certainly no. But the positive thing is: the answer was always “almost certainly no.” Most fiction writers in any era did not make any money. Even the greats often worked day jobs and still died young and penniless. And even when a short story or novel sold millions, the writer often got very little. Certainly not enough to get above minimum wage ...


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One Missed Opportunity You could even put a link to your book on your StackExchange profile. It is very free and I just checked yours for the book. Unfortunately it was not there. Create a Blog Create a blog, start writing free articles and give them away and then give away the book there too. Create Web Site With Short Link Create a web site like ...


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If you can produce a quality ePub file, and you don't have any particular interest in Kindle Select (which requires exclusivity), I see little reason to limit yourself to Kindle. Why limit yourself to only Kindle readers? There's a big world of readers out there. Get your book in front of as many of them as you can. Of course, using multiple retailers does ...


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You'll get better rates from Amazon if you'll publish exclusively and you don't have to pay for the ISBN. I can't see any real problem for you, if you'll start without an ISBN. Usually you can get one at any time.


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If you want to publish elsewhere, you will need to have an ISBN. Consider the Amazon Publisher number as a national ID card for your book on KDP. It's necessary and only this is necessary on KDP. But if you want it goes on another publication circuit, your book have to got it's passport. It's the ISBN. But you can take it later. Like Mela said, Amazon will ...


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Generally, in my experience the use of foul language or descriptive sex scenes will not cause your book to receive the dreaded "Adult" content rating. The primary content taboos are bestiality, incest, and non-consensual sex. Also, any nudity or blatantly sexual images on the cover will result in your book getting labeled as "Adult". For some discussions on ...


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I have self-published several erotica titles under a pen name through KDP, and I've participated in a number of discussions about this in a writer's forum that I frequent. What we have seen over time is that there are certain topics that Amazon considers taboo, and those are pretty certain to get you banned. These topics include bestiality, incest, and ...


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The obvious advantages to publishing on Kindle for a self-publishing author is that there's no up-front investment. You don't have to pay a vanity press to print thousands of copies of your book before you know if anyone besides your mother will buy a copy. But their are print-on-demand publishers who offer the same or similar deals for print books. I ...


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Kindle is the most popular platform for ebooks. It's not so much a question of whether you should publish on Kindle as whether you should publish exclusively on Kindle (which gives you some bonuses, like a larger royalty, and distribution on Kindle Unlimited) or whether you should publish on a number of platforms. If you publish on Kindle Select (exclusive) ...



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