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8

Amazon will send you a 1099 that will identify the amount of royalties that they paid you. If you are just now starting, I would strongly recommend setting aside at least 30% of everything you earn in royalties as soon as you receive it. You are now considered self-employed, and the self employment tax as 15% of your royalties, and the Social ...


8

No, you don't need to set up a business to self-publish a book. In the U.S., royalty income and all related expenses to publishing the book (e.g. paying a graphic designer to create a cover, advertising, travel expenses for a book tour, etc.) are reported on Schedule C of your personal tax return. EDIT Regarding Social Security and Medicare taxes, you ...


7

In the description say "short story - 20 pages" or some such.


7

I'm answering this as a technician, not as a writer: it's not wise to share your email anywhere in Internet, and I believe it's valid for ebooks also. I say that because your email will become public and a lot of people - and scripts - you don't know will use it. That will make sure you will receive in your email SPAM, STRANGE MESSAGES, UNDESIRABLE ...


6

According to the Publishing FAQ I found on Amazon, customers have to specifically request the new version: If you’ve already purchased your book and subsequently revise the content and re-publish the updated version, you don’t need to re-purchase the book to get a copy. At this time, it’s not possible for publishers to receive the updated file without ...


5

There's no need to choose. Do both. Put the individual stories up as singles, and put the collection up also. Just make sure people know what's in the collection. Steven King has published some standalone short stories. "Ur." "Riding the Bullet." Probably some others I can't think of at the moment.


5

Actually, if you contact KDP Support, they will send out an e-mail to all customers who have already purchased your book to let them know that there is a new version available. They will send an e-mail to the people who have already purchased the book which directs them to respond to the e-mail with the word "Yes" in the first line of the response message. ...


4

MS Word brings a lot of trash along, when converted to HTML. By trash, I mean unnecessary formating tags and styles that can mess your content if you decide to change it in the future. I won't give much more details but MS Word was design to create Doc files, not HTML. If you need something else than Doc files, Word is probably not for you. HTML is ...


3

There are many different defenitions of this, and many major awards like the Hugo have their own, but using averages: Generally a story longer than the 500-1000 word range of a flash fiction, and shorter than the 7,500 minimum length of a novelette, would count as a short story. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flash_fiction ...


3

When saving a file from Word as HTML, Word acts as a WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) HTML editor. From personal experience, the HTML produced by the program is passable and effective, though inelegant and usually not the absolute best it could be. The only impact this has, the vast majority of the time, is that the file-size is the tiniest bit ...


3

Dean Wesley Smith famously advises against pricing anything at $0.99. That's the discount bin. It tells buyers that it's a cheap read, not that it's a good read. Why not price your book as if you expected readers to want it? Here is a bunch of advice from Dean about indie pricing: http://www.deanwesleysmith.com/?tag=pricing


3

For ebooks, the general rule is, don't use two consecutive returns (as @Fortier mentioned in the comments). This is because the ebook readers sometimes do weird things with it. However, this is just a suggestion, and almost every Ebook vendor will allow it. Kindle only moans if you enter KDP. My advice is, write the book, and worry about formatting later. ...


2

For Kindle versions, I'd agree with the other posters that doing both is the easy way out. Maybe a little more trouble, but not all that much. If you find that one or the other has only a tiny number of sales, then maybe next time you don't bother. And hey, maybe you could let us know here. For a printed book, I think you'd want to publish the collection. ...


2

I've seen this on the cover of some single short stories: [title] A short story written by [name].


2

At the end, after the story is finished, in a section called "Author's notes." You can list your thanks, your sources, and any other comments you want to make.


2

Imagine that you have three potential readers, Alice, Bob, and Carol, and three stories, X, Y, and Z. Alice would pay $3 for X, $2 for Y, and $1 for Z. Bob would pay $3 for Y, $2 for Z, and $1 for X. Carol would pay $3 for Z, $2 for X, and $1 for Y. If you offer X+Y+Z as an anthology for $6, you will get three readers for each story and $18 in gross sales. ...


1

Note that short stories are much more difficult to sell than full-length novels. My company's just published a collection of stories in a popular genre by some pretty well-known authors, for a decently low price, distributed through mainstream channels and it's sold under 500 copies in six months. If you're after sales, write full-length fiction. If you're ...


1

The length of your work is put into the description of your book automatically (page count or word count). If you do not think that's sufficient you can mention it in your explicit description you provide for your book. Besides that there may be categories for short fiction, so if you choose one of these the customer can find out what he is buying. That ...


1

About your question, I like what Wikipedia has to say ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short_story ): Short stories have no set length. In terms of word count there is no official demarcation between an anecdote, a short story, and a novel. Rather, the form's parameters are given by the rhetorical and practical context in which a given story is produced ...


1

From everything I've read on the subject, the collection will sell better. The stories will necessarily be cheaper, and can easily get lost in the "bargain bin." But Dale Emery has a great point -- there's no reason to choose. Make sure you link them all to each other, so people can see how buying the collection is a great deal.


1

I don't see many people paying even $0.99 for a single short story. There are many very good novels for $5 or less. More than people have time to read. OTOH, a collection of good short stories can be better than a novel. But maybe I'm cheap. I don't understand why anyone would pay $1 for a single song off an album. Yet lots of people do.


1

See the definition of the mobipocket file format.



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