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There are many great jargon terms for these things. At one publication we called any such blurb an "excuse" (pronounced as the word that means 'why something happened,' not 'excuse me')


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A dateline must be where the reporter reported from. As an analogue to web publishing, it is a location and timestamp on an article. For example, an earthquake may occur in a remote part of Brazil, and the dateline would be RIO DI JANEIRO if that's where the report was filed from (the reporter sat in an office in Rio and gathered the news and filed the ...


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This is called a dateline. Look at the relevant Wikipedia article for a guide to proper formatting and links to the Wall Street Journal and Associated Press style guides. Contrary to what the Wikipedia article claims, the dateline does not (necessarily) describe "where and when the story occurred", but where and when the news originated. I have read ...


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The dateline shows when and where the story was written (or filed), not merely where the events occurred. Newspapers and other news services spend a lot of money to send reporters overseas. An overseas dateline tells the reader that they are getting the news from someone who was close to the event, rather than a second-hand account.


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In a news story it is very, very common that you will need to specify the place and the date. A convention that you put it at the beginning of the article is more concisely than working it into the text, and makes it easy to find when people are referring to a newspaper article long after the fact. Sure, you could say, "There was an earthquake in Someville ...


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I'm pretty sure it originates as a Journalism style. It is a newspaper era journalism technique and ultimately I think its an easy and quick way for journalists to answer two of the important 'W's right off the bat. As soon as you begin reading you know where and when, and the story can focus on explaining the who, what, and why. It saves print. With all ...



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