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6

There's no single standard about this. Whether you engage your readers is up to you, in some cases up to your editor at the publication in question (or perhaps their policies). Barring that kind of guidance, here are the pros and cons of reading the comments and replying to them: Joining the discussion can make you part of the community. This can create ...


3

Japan's press appears to work differently than ours. According to an article in the German newspaper Die Tageszeitung, in Japan there are 800 press clubs which reside directly in offices in the ministries, industrial companies and so on, about which they report. Only the largest newspapers and tv stations have access to these press clubs. The accredited ...


3

There are two reasons. First, as described in this answer, news articles are written as an inverted pyramid and are designed to be cut at any paragraph break and still work. In the late stages of newspaper assembly, the editor making the decisions about what goes where and making it all fit is not going to read and decide -- he's going to lop it off at a ...


2

Once an event is over, you should (ideally) always have a NEW article about the event, describing how it went, and what it has led to. This will push the old article down the page (assuming your web site is set up properly). Then you should do as Dale Emery suggests: add a link to the new article at the top of the old article. But also add a "disclaimer" ...


2

Note: This is from my perspective as a consumer. I think it's okay to leave the present/future tense, especially if the date of the article is clearly visible. Most of the time I don't mind (much) finding an old, somewhat outdated article as long as the date is obvious. Google searches (and perhaps others) allow users to specify a timeframe for their ...


2

I don't know of a central place to do that. But you can make your interest known. In a blog post and other social media, tell your fans what subject you are researching and solicit their tips. Perhaps make your "tip line" posts a featured part of your blog. Of course, this reaches only your current fans, who may or may not have tips about your next ...


1

Journalists don't sit at home and wait for information to come to them. They talk to people. Finding the right people to talk to, and making them talk, is the specific skill of the journalist. Anyone can condense Google results into an article. There is even software that does that automatically. If you haven't yet learned the skill of reporting (that is, ...


1

I'm not sure if my list is comprehensive, but: news reporting columns/editorials (opinion pieces) criticism/reviews/commentary essays (including investigative journalism, popular science etc) interviews and minor forms like headlines or summaries(blurbs) for front page or RSS, live reporting (minute-by-minute newsfeeds), taglines and so on. These are ...


1

1. Planning Decide where your editorial calendar will live. Possible options include Google Calendar, Podio, Trello, and Asana. Each of these systems is great for multi-user management, and all of them have free versions. 2. Start building Start with a calendar that marks important dates. For instance, if I'm a romance writer, I'll be sure to include ...


1

First, in demand and interesting is the proper goal, but it has no relationship with popular and trending. Or rather, topics that are "in demand and interesting" usually become "popular and trending" after a delay at which time they will no longer be "in demand and interesting". Just increasingly popular. What does "in demand" mean? It means that the ...



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