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6

There's no single standard about this. Whether you engage your readers is up to you, in some cases up to your editor at the publication in question (or perhaps their policies). Barring that kind of guidance, here are the pros and cons of reading the comments and replying to them: Joining the discussion can make you part of the community. This can create ...


5

I'm pretty sure it originates as a Journalism style. It is a newspaper era journalism technique and ultimately I think its an easy and quick way for journalists to answer two of the important 'W's right off the bat. As soon as you begin reading you know where and when, and the story can focus on explaining the who, what, and why. It saves print. With all ...


2

I'm not sure if my list is comprehensive, but: news reporting columns/editorials (opinion pieces) criticism/reviews/commentary essays (including investigative journalism, popular science etc) interviews and minor forms like headlines or summaries(blurbs) for front page or RSS, live reporting (minute-by-minute newsfeeds), taglines and so on. These are ...


2

I don't know of a central place to do that. But you can make your interest known. In a blog post and other social media, tell your fans what subject you are researching and solicit their tips. Perhaps make your "tip line" posts a featured part of your blog. Of course, this reaches only your current fans, who may or may not have tips about your next ...


1

The dateline shows when and where the story was written (or filed), not merely where the events occurred. Newspapers and other news services spend a lot of money to send reporters overseas. An overseas dateline tells the reader that they are getting the news from someone who was close to the event, rather than a second-hand account.


1

In a news story it is very, very common that you will need to specify the place and the date. A convention that you put it at the beginning of the article is more concisely than working it into the text, and makes it easy to find when people are referring to a newspaper article long after the fact. Sure, you could say, "There was an earthquake in Someville ...


1

Journalists don't sit at home and wait for information to come to them. They talk to people. Finding the right people to talk to, and making them talk, is the specific skill of the journalist. Anyone can condense Google results into an article. There is even software that does that automatically. If you haven't yet learned the skill of reporting (that is, ...


1

1. Planning Decide where your editorial calendar will live. Possible options include Google Calendar, Podio, Trello, and Asana. Each of these systems is great for multi-user management, and all of them have free versions. 2. Start building Start with a calendar that marks important dates. For instance, if I'm a romance writer, I'll be sure to include ...



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