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9

I don't have any special knowledge of journalism, but I have a fair amount of experience with academic writing as well as giving advice to my grad students. Here's my take, all at the paper level: You're right about the possibility of sensationalism. I tell some of my students to imagine someone reading their work twenty years from now. Too much enthusiasm ...


8

As an ex-journalist my guideline is - just write it, two hours and done. Later try not to think too much about it, focus on the next story instead and come back. If you've got the time for it, review the text on the next day, correct the most obvious things and send it. Other way, if you spend too much time on it, you can pretty quickly get bored with ...


8

Remember that although AP Style is used by many different publications and media, it is FOR journalists writing news articles. As such, there really is no such thing as attribution to sources because that doesn't really occur in news writing. Instead, AP Style uses in-text attribution generally in the form of direct or indirect quotations. "Revenues are ...


6

I am not personally an artist, but I know many artists. In my experience reading their statements the intention seems to be a combination of explaining why you love art, what your credentials are (degrees, famous artists in your medium studied under, what galleries you have exhibited in, any students you have taught, positive press, etc.), and what you ...


5

An important consideration is that in the US, the FTC requires clear disclosure of paid reviews by bloggers. Both the advertiser and the blogger may be held liable if the blogger does not disclose that the review was paid. From ...


5

Your assumption about hours rather than days for the mechanical processes of writing (a feature article, for example) is probably correct. I have "text entered" 1000 words in a day more than once. The proviso is that the work has been built and rebuilt in my head over several days (possibly weeks) before I commit to the keyboard. On those occasions when ...


5

As I see it, getting paid for reviews can be broken down into different scenarios: You work for someone that pays you to review other products i.e. you're being paid by a neutral party with no affiliation to the product itself. You are approached by someone with a vested interest in the product, and are either paid to review that product, or get given the ...


5

The degree is less important than your clips and prior work experience. However, journalism is very hierarchical. Bigger papers have a higher status, higher pay, better jobs, etc, and they only hire reporters with good clips, and experience at larger papers. So you're going to have to start at a smaller paper, and work your way to bigger papers. I know a guy ...


4

I found this page after searching the web: How to Reference a Book in AP Style. It outlines how to cite sources, but annoyingly enough, doesn't cite the information it gives. I suspect it's from the AP web edition, as my print version doesn't have anything like this. I commented on this article, and I'll update this answer if I get more information.


4

Well, having been a Social Science major and a Journalism minor who has written several academic papers and worked for a variety of newspapers and magazines here is the difference for me. In academic writing you generally introduce a topic by presenting a thesis or a hypothesis, then you lay out the premise of the discussion, then you discuss the topic and ...


4

You are asking for opinion, and this, I believe, is offtopic on this site. But as long as your question stands, here is my opinion: In this time and age, grabbing money wherever you can, is the norm. Not taking money, when you can, is generally considered stupid. So you should. Everybody does. Fooling the customer is not unethical, otherwise advertising ...


3

That would be the "author bio" Here are some links that may be of use: http://www.rachellegardner.com/2011/07/how-to-write-a-terrific-author-bio/ http://www.absolutewrite.com/freelance_writing/bio.htm


3

When I worked for a major web portal, I was "in a different dept" and all I got was a bit of word on mouth, coffee gossip and "customer interview" (editors discussing features they needed in the portal), so take this with a grain of salt, especially that it was a moderately average portal in a backwater country on an unfashionable continent. The job is 95% ...


3

There are two reasons. First, as described in this answer, news articles are written as an inverted pyramid and are designed to be cut at any paragraph break and still work. In the late stages of newspaper assembly, the editor making the decisions about what goes where and making it all fit is not going to read and decide -- he's going to lop it off at a ...


3

As a former journalism major (who has used almost none of those skills professionally), let me tell you right now that you DO NOT make changes to what a person says EVER. Don't misrepresent what the interviewee says. Don't misquote them. Don't change the meaning of what your interviewee says. But you can leave the word whiskers out. Leaving out all the ...


3

It's pretty simple. Use in-line citations. According to stackechange.com, blah, blah blah or "Text of quote goes here," John Doe wrote in The New York Times.


3

The AP Stylebook is the ultimate resource when it comes to AP style. You can purchase it in several forms through the AP Stylebook website. The print version for $18.95 plus shipping The online version for $25.00 The iOS version for $24.99 (in the App Store). Libraries and universities with journalism programs may also have group subscriptions that you ...


2

I heard once from a relative who knows a lot of professional journalists (and is a published nonfiction writer) that a journalism degree is actually a waste of time, because field experience matters more than an academic degree in the field. I'd say, four years in the field is a much better use of your time. I'd say start out trying to intern at a small ...


2

The best way to increase your efficiency and productivity is writing. I mean, you can read 1000 books on the matter and listen to 1000 advised but the only thing that will make you more productive is actually writing. Of course you will be able to sit and put some of that theory to work also, but is the practice that it matters. In any case, what I use to ...


2

Japan's press appears to work differently than ours. According to an article in the German newspaper Die Tageszeitung, in Japan there are 800 press clubs which reside directly in offices in the ministries, industrial companies and so on, about which they report. Only the largest newspapers and tv stations have access to these press clubs. The accredited ...


2

If you want to look up by both title and date, I'd list each entry as: [Entry title] [Entry date] [Page Number] where "Page Number" refers to your existing 2-page numbering. You'll have no trouble finding the entry you're looking for once you've opened up the right 2 pages...


1

First, in demand and interesting is the proper goal, but it has no relationship with popular and trending. Or rather, topics that are "in demand and interesting" usually become "popular and trending" after a delay at which time they will no longer be "in demand and interesting". Just increasingly popular. What does "in demand" mean? It means that the ...


1

In the financial world, it is common for a company to pay a credit rating agency to review their company's ability to repay debt (meaning their ability to repay bond holders) and make that review publicly available. http://www.cfr.org/financial-crises/credit-rating-controversy/p22328#p3


1

I write news stories about technology. This means that I have to be as quick as I can when reporting news. It's not very easy to keep up with such a pace and over the years I learned some 'tricks' on how to improve my efficiency. A big part of this process is eliminating the distraction. So, when I sit to write, I close all the unnecessary tabs, especially ...


1

It's conventional to drop the "umm"s and "you know"s and correct obvious grammar errors. Like if someone says in a speech "Senator Jones say he will ..." I think most reporters would correct that to "Senator Jones SAYS he will ..." with no hesitation. Similarly, when people are speaking, they often repeat themselves and generally ramble. It's routinely ...


1

This depends largely on the site. On some sites, editors just collect and aggregate news. On others they write columns or work with other columnists. On websites that have a print section, they may just coordinate with web producers. However, it is still very much a job.


1

Maybe this is not the answer you're looking for but, have you tried to ask your supervisor what are the concrete complaints he has about your style? Unless your field of research is related to journalism, it is possible that your supervisor actually doesn't know how to structure a journalistic text well or at all. On the other hand, he knows scientific ...



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