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11

As you say, DOIs are becoming dominate in scientific publishing, so it would be useful to have one in that arena. On the other hand ISBN (And it's cousin, the ISSN) are still the main way to identify a publication. There is also a lot of useful things that the ISBN number is used for. Right now you can put an ISBN number into pretty much any bookseller (or ...


7

Book titles are often duplicated quite by accident, and there is pretty much no way of preventing other people from publishing a book with the same title. It happens all the time, and as long as the title isn't something trademarked (like something in the Star Wars universe), it's generally not a problem. I'd recommend you concentrate on writing the book, ...


5

It absolutely SHOULD be different for both formats. That said... If it were published by a big publisher, I'd be totally confident that it would be. But I don't know anything about the NHBS, so it's not impossible that they've gotten a little sloppy and not bothered. And Amazon is a bit worrisome because they have their own book numbering system, and ...


5

You require the barcode as an image that you can place on the cover just like (for example) the thumbnail picture of the author. There are plenty of free software packages that will generate barcodes in different styles. Be careful that the one you choose "understands" the requirements of ISBN. Online Barcode Generator provided on a web page by Terry ...


5

(picture can be found here: dLSoft) 978-3-16-148410-0 is the ISBN (number). The vertical strokes below that number are the barcode (which represents the number above).


4

Please check the FAQ! The purpose of the ISBN is to establish and identify one title or edition of a title from one specific publisher and is unique to that edition, allowing for more efficient marketing of products by booksellers, libraries, universities, wholesalers and distributors. It will vary from each specific edition and publisher and it makes ...


4

Since your question specifically addressed ISBNs, I will limit my response to only that. First of all, every country has a different organizing body that is responsible for distributing and managing ISBNs. Even if you had used the same publisher abroad and in the US, you still would have been required to obtain separate ISBNs. In fact, if you decide to ...


3

You should ask this question to the CreatSpace community. Besides that, you can add your own barcode as the help stated.


3

My book, Writing The Science Fiction Film, is due out in April 2013 but it already has an ISBN number. I didn't deal with it my publisher MWP organised it, but it shows that it is possible to do. They've also told me that it will appear for pre-order on Amazon etc. very soon (this is 6 months in advance of publication date!) and it obviously will need one ...


3

I am pretty sure that the ISBN number would be different if the dimensions of the book were not the same. I know that ISBN numbers are not the same when the paper stock is changed to be "acid free", so even with the same dimension a book could have different ISBN numbers. Publishers use ISBN numbers to keep track of their inventory and costs/profits, etc... ...


2

I'm working with a writer who's self-publishing, and she had to get a different ISBN for the hardcover, softcover, and eBook versions of her novel. I remember reading somewhere that if you issue a new version of the book (change the content in any significant way), you need a new ISBN as well. So yes, it should be different, but I agree with Kate's ...


2

In the publishing world, ISBNs are the standard. They're rarely reused (though it does happen on occasion) and it's how most booksellers and the like will be able to find a book quickly. I've never heard of someone using a DOI over an ISBN. Most people wouldn't even know what a DOI is.


2

An ISBN is the book industry's standard "ordering number" for a book. If you want to sell a book through bookstores or most online publishers, you pretty much have to get an ISBN. If you are only publishing through your own local network, and no one in that network requires an ISBN, than I guess you don't need one. By the way, they're not that difficult to ...


2

ISBN or International Standard Book Number is a unique number assigned to a book. It is issued by a central ISBN agency in your country. In USA, you can obtain your ISBN numbers from the Bowker Agency. So the basic difference between 2 is just of the form. As ISBN is just a Number and ISBN Barcode is a Barcode. ISBN Barcode is a unique commercial book ...


2

I agree with what the commenters have already said (and think some of them should be turned into answers), so assume this is building upon their replies. As they said, you usually only have one ISBN per book, only changing ISBNs if something substantial changes about the book. If the publisher changes, if the size changes, or if it changes from hardcover to ...


1

Click the button next to "Ids" in the middle column of the "Edit Metadata" dialog:


1

No, you cannot. It is illegal. The ISBN codifies (among other things) the publisher. If you steal that ISBN, then you state that your book was published by your co-author's publisher. But you published that book. You are responsible for it, not the publisher of your co-author. You are pretending that a different publisher published your book. Which is just ...



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