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16

One of the best books you can read on the subject is Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics. The book itself is written as a comic, so it can illustrate the techniques it discusses. One of the topics covered is word-picture dynamics, which seems pretty close to what you're looking for.


14

It often helps because fantasy books often involve quite a bit of travel. It is not strictly necessary for the novel to be coherent, but I have found the ones that I've read that lacked maps to be worse off because of it. Namely, "The Blade Itself" by Joe Abercrombie is a good example of a book that lacks a map that really needed one. He talks about wars ...


9

If you want to obtain the copyright for any artwork, you must put it in writing. Otherwise, the artist will retain copyright, while you will merely have a license to use the artwork in the book for which they were created, and the artist may bar you from using the artwork in other books, or even other editions of the same book. Your contract should ...


7

Do you already have a map? The answer depends a bit on that. If, for example, you find yourself drawing maps for yourself already, then yes, it might be useful to beef that one up a bit and include it as reference material. But if you don't already have a map, then don't feel pressured into thinking that you need a map.


7

As an artistic aid, I think maps are great. Beyond that, they become crutches, or worse - detriments to the reader's experience. If a writer cannot explain (using the tools of their trade!) the world eloquently enough for you to have a clear idea in your mind's eye - then the world is too complex for their skill level. Period. Tacking on pictures in ...


6

If you think without one it would be too hard for readers to envision, then yes. I can't stand books that push countless places with indecipherable names upon you and expect you to remember all of them. If you're worried about the readers that would rather visualise it themselves, you could have the map sparse on detail, just showing the layout of the ...


4

I think it all depends on whether the map adds to the overall experience for the reader. If in the writing you are able to clearly identify location and distances in relation to other geographical locations, then no. If you don't and you think the story would be enhanced if the reader could easily visualise the world you are creating, then yes. Personally ...


4

If the work is in public domain, you can do mostly anything with it - including creating derivative works, in particular illustrations. If it was still copyrighted, you'd still probably be able to create illustrations but they wouldn't do much good as stand-alone, and bundling them with the original work would require license to use the original work for ...


3

Here's how it shook out with regard to my own project. My illustrator wanted to retain the copyright, and grant me a limited-use license in conjunction with my creative work. When pressed, she gave me a second, higher price for relinquishing the copyright. I took the first option. Here is the language we settled on: The Artist grants the Client ...


3

Yes, illustrations can have a good effect on your writings, just don't turn your book into glance journal. Basically, your publisher could take illustrating work on himself, but if you want to furnish your book yourself, here are some advices: 1. Find a good image for cover of your book. This is the most important illustration of your book, perhaps, ...


3

It depends on how you want to use it. If you're just looking for inspiration, Deviant Art is a good place to start, or someplace else if your interests have their own art site. On the other hand, if you're looking for art to put in your story that's going to be different, though believe it or not Deviant Art is a great place for that as well. Now, if ...


2

Spoken as a reader, I usually look at the map at begin of the reading, but mostly ignore it while reading. The map may be nice and artful, but for me it's the same as the cover. A good story I can enjoy without it. In some novels the travels of the character are so confusing, that I need the map, to keep track. But mostly I think, the author should avoid ...


2

A map can be a nice touch, or it can be a hindrance. Are there are particular scenes where a map would let you snip out several paragraphs of tedious explanation? If there are only one or two such scenes, this need might be better served by simply putting a rough map in those places, possibly even inline with the text. I think that a lot of fantasy books ...


2

If you have a big universe and plan on having multiple stories, then a map is a nice touch. Bout it's also limiting. If your first book only focuses on a small part of the world and you include a full world map, then your second book has more constraints to it as you can't just invent another continent, at least not without a good explanation. Of course, ...


2

Each agent and publisher will have their own submission guidelines, and many do accept electronic submissions. I don't know of any, however, who will take phone calls from new authors who have never been published. You'll most likely end up with a message left with a receptionist somewhere. I would recommend starting out with agents by sending a link to ...


2

Scott McCloud is a good starting point in terms of understanding the potential of what comics as a hybrid medium can accomplish. That being said, in response to your interest in writing, as opposed to drawing or inking, I would recommend: The DC Comics Guide to Writing - Dennis O'Neil Alan Moore's Writing for Comics - Alan Moore Both provide interesting ...


2

As with any other application of "writing", it's recommended to read voraciously. The more I think about it, the more I think that reading is at least as important as practice. So... you do love comics? Have a large comic collection? Or at least read lots and lots of (different style/genre preferably) comics? Know whatever genre you want to do in your ...


2

Since you intend to self-publish, you will need to spend a lot of time doing the non-creative tasks, such as marketing. A cover image is part of marketing. It is, in fact, one of the most important elements. It's the first thing that the customers see and they'll judge whether they want your book or not by it. If that cover doesn't attract and/or meet their ...


1

I scoured DeviantArt for artists with styles that I liked and approached artists through that about commissions. That said, cover art is quite a different beast, often a mix of photography and graphic design so your mileage may vary. Fiverr is a super cheap place to go for outsourcing design. As an aside, I found Bettina on DeviantArt who did an awesome ...


1

Consider one of the "crowdsourced design" sites. The idea is that you hold a design contest, and pay for the winner. The process takes a week or so. I have not used crowdsourced designs myself, so I cannot recommend one. (I use stock images from Dreamstime for my covers). The Self-Publishing Podcast guys seem to like 99 Designs.


1

Dean Smith, whom Shantnu Tiwari mentions in his/her answer, is an established writer with many books on the market published by established publishers. As a new writer, being published by a publishing house means that there was some selection process that filtered out the worst writers. As a reader, blindly grabbing a book from any of the big publishing ...


1

Why not both? Dean W Smith often recommends this. Self publish the book, and then send a copy to traditional publishers. Many legacy publishers now buy top selling Indie authors. Selling to legacy publishers will be hard, unless you are already famous, or a best seller. If you publish it yourself, you can start making money immediately, and later on, may ...


1

Before you start querying, you must, must, must familiarize yourself with submission guidelines - for the field in general, and for the specific agents and publishers you find are appropriate for you to query. With the strategy you suggest, you're running smack into two common guidelines. And even if your case, for whatever reason, is so exceptional that ...


1

Skip the map. Maps in books are pretentious and dumb. If you have a passage like, "...and so they travelled South, crossing the Mountains of Grimstorm at Thousandwolf Pass then bent their way Westward to the Parchnoth Desert," and a reader gets upset because he doesn't know where all those places are, then don't worry about that reader. Maybe he thinks ...


1

I find maps will help fans to get a stronger idea of your world. Look how detailed LOTR is getting! However, like movies, if you read the book first, and have images of the world in your head... That map can totally destroy the readers own view of your world.


1

I believe every little bit helps. My skill with world and place description is not what I like and I don't feel I can do much about it, so my solution is to add images to make it easier for readers to follow me. And don't forget that the map can be a great tool for yourself. If you have a complex plot, it probably makes sense to create a detailed map and ...



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