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2

Relevant thought on the subject "The reader wants to work. ...the reader wants to fill in the details. He wants to be invested in the novel and to make his own decisions and reach his own conclusions . You don’t need to write everything. You can leave pieces (of plot, description, dialogue) out. The reader will get in the game. His imagination matters ...


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I have this exact same problem, I'm glad you asked the question! The other answers have been very helpful, and I'll take be using their suggestions in my own work. I've been looking at cutting down some portions of my story, and this will help immensely. In case you absolutely need the 'intermediate' scenes, I will offer suggestions to what I've been doing ...


5

You should find a way to skip ahead. If you don't want to write it the reader won't want to read it either. And your references to 'some switches' and 'several lights' suggest you aren't really invested in this scene at all. If you want to jump ahead though, you need to jump too something so concoct a little bit of drama. Things to try: Focus on the main ...


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In my own writing, I skip everything that I'm not interested in. I don't care if it is usually part of other novels, because if I read those, I usually skip reading those parts as well or only scan them quickly to have an idea of what is going on. I totally rely on my readers to have seen so many movies and read so many books in my genre, that they are ...


3

I totally agree with the answer given by Tommy Myron, but I think there is one thing to add about the way you look at this question. I think whether you decide to use your ideas now depends on whether the ideas concerned are or are not naturally part of your current plot. If they are, i.e. if they fit harmoniously into the series of events that you consider ...


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This idea was used in a TV show called "John Doe", but I don't remember in which episode it was. wikipedia link


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I realize that I am probably getting way ahead of myself in planning book 3 when I haven't even finished book 1 Not necessarily. I would actually recommend that you know exactly how things will turn out before you begin. As to your question: Should I use up good ideas within a book that I'm already planning on writing that wouldn't be utilized to ...



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