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2

Don't mislead the reader. It is a cheap trick that will leave the reader unsatisfied and disinclined to trust you as an author. This does not mean you cannot have surprise, but the surprise should be produced by the logical progress of the story, not by artificially withholding information. Ask yourself, whose story is this. There may be surprises in the ...


1

I would avoid using the antagonist's POV if you want him to remain a mystery. In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, one of the main characters is referred to throughout as person X, but is eventually revealed as person Y in disguise. This only works (to the extent that it actually does) because the series sticks closely to Harry's POV. If you're really ...


0

This what I do: I give what I have to someone I trust to tell me truth. If they like it, it gives me motivation to keep writing it. I hope this helped!


1

This seems to be a problem for a lot of writer. My advice is to incorporate as many as you can with the story still making sense. The rest just need to be discarded, or put into another that story. Hope this helped!


3

This comes from a novice author, so take it with a pinch of salt, but here goes: I'm not 100% clear which perspective you're writing from (you've mentioned omniscient as well as individual characters' POVs), but it sounds like you're using what's often called 'third-person limited'. The narrative says 'he/she', but follows the viewpoint and experiences of ...


3

Don't name him in his own thoughts. (I'm going to add names here for ease of discussion.) You have: vengeance was his, Garth of the Bill clan. He was the Foremost of the Forsworn But he's not actually Garth of the Bill clan. That's what he wants his enemy Dave to think. He's actually Wayne of the Ted clan. While Garth and Wayne are both Dave's enemies,...


0

Carpe Diem. it could summarize it all. Use your best ideas, while you're still enthusiastic about it, it will give you the enregy to write it down (and writing takes a lot of energy) You will evolve, as a writer and as a person, so trust your future self to find other great ideas ! Carpe. Diem !


1

You can concentrate on details, without describing the whole "thing" that survived, so everytime you describe a small part. Other solution : the "Show don't tell" rule. The reader with some indications will know that you're in a post-apocalyptic world, so it's kind of obvious that some buildings were destroyed and other still stand, but you don't have to ...


1

First, make sure character has different concerns and preferences and attitudes about things. Then, each character would naturally notice or focus on different aspects of the building. And if two or more characters were to linger on the same aspect, they would have different opinions of it. If the characters notice different things, and have different ...


1

Give contrast. Insist on everything that hasn't survived, which could also serve to explain everything that happened. If there are more instances (small side notes, rather than big paragraphs) of destroyed things than things that have survived, the latter will stand out much better.


0

It depends. If you're actually planning to publish that idea anywhere else than Wattpad, you might want to wait. No one is going to write a book to be published on his first try, no matter how talented he is. The first book you write might seem amazing to you at the moment, but look at it again one year later, after much more writing experience, and you're ...


5

In any creative discipline you should absolutely work to the best of your ability at every stage of your career as your previous works are both your way to show the world what you are capable of and a platform for you to build on. Similarly 'ideas' are often a bit overrated, creativity is not so much about having brilliant flashes of inspiration so much ...


0

Use them, before someone else does. If you want to do a "remix" later, you probably won't accuse yourself of plagiarism.


8

Use your good ideas. Just don't give away the rights to your creation. Make sure that you can re-use your story and elements. I've seen countless stories about people who made a wonderful classic early in their career. (I'm talking about creators, and not necessarily writers specifically. Could be writers, game makers, etc.) Then later in life, they ...


6

Ask yourself: how motivated will you feel writing about a mediocre story? To improve, you need to write—a lot. You won’t enjoy writing if you’re not passionate about your story. Pick your best idea, the one that sets your creativity ablaze, and write it. Make sure you finish it. If the writing is not good enough for publication, then move on to the next ...


3

FWIW, here's my personal story that can perhaps serve as a teaching point in relation to the question: I wrote my first fiction when I was 6 yrs old - a 2-paragraph Donald Duck mystery I began writing short stories when I was 13-14 I won a small local award for a short story I wrote when I was 18 I began writing novels at that time, fully expecting to be ...


29

Use your best ideas. Write them as well as you can. Yes, your writing will improve with experience. And your ideas will also improve with experience. If you reserve your "best ideas" until you're a better writer, then your early stories will exhibit neither your best ideas nor your best writing. Why hamper yourself like that? Sometimes people love great ...



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