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8

The iPad is pretty good, but I would suggest getting a USB keyboard as well. You can find some nice cases that have the keyboard built in so you can open them up and type. I usually get 10-12 hours on my iPad, though I don't use the blue tooth. As for laptops, I have a netbook myself, and I can get six hours out of that without much trouble if I set the ...


7

I don't use my iPad for my manuscript, but I know several authors who do. They tend to belong to the large camp of writers who prefer using plain text editors for their writing in order to avoid distraction. However, I do use it for note-taking. I use a combination of two apps for this: Springpad and Elements. Springpad is nice because it doubles as a web ...


6

Not a tablet, but a mini notebook sounds like it meets your size and battery life requirements. I have a Toshiba NB 205. 10" screen, less than 3 pounds with 7 hour battery life. Windows 7. Powerful enough to run Office, but I choose not to. I carry it in a backpack on the train daily.


5

I did a blog post on this last year: Can You Get Real Writing Work Done on an iPad? My answer was yes, by the way. An edited excerpt (considerably more at the link): For casual writing (emails, mainly), the iPad’s on-screen keyboard is sufficient. When I had to work on a chapter of the latest book, I turned to one app and an Apple Wireless ...


4

The enTourage eDGe looks like an amazing tablet for writers and editors. It opens like a book and on the left is an ereader with an e-ink screen and on the right is an Android powered tablet. The EE can be folded completely back so that only one screen is visible. The e-ink reader side also lets you use a stylus to write on the document you have open. My ...


3

Absolutely. I wrote about 60% of my NaNoWriMo content on an iPad, both on the bus and at the local library, using PlainText. Several times, I wrote for over two hours on the device. My typing rate, while lower, was not substantially lower than with a full keyboard. That said, it's not as easy or comfortable as a laptop or desktop (or a Bluetooth keyboard, ...


3

I find that Pages works pretty well (Pages is Apples word process for the iPad). There are a couple extra steps to get documents out of the application, but nothing huge. Though for long term typing I would use a Bluetooth keyboard. Also, a book stand works well to hold up the iPad so it's comfortable to read as you type.


2

If you want a Windows option, HP and Dell both have great tablets. HP's tm2 (shopping link) and Dell's Inspiron duo (shopping link) are good, consumer-focused models.


2

I do, quite regularly. Initially, I used it to write for classes mostly. Now, I've begun to work on more creative projects using Pages and an Apple Bluetooth Keyboard. Though the Apple keyboard costs a little more than a non-name brand device, it fits perfectly alongside the keyboard in my bag. At present, I use a small iPad wedge stand, but I'm ...


2

As a Game Master for a bi-weekly role-playing group, I write a lot of notes on my iPad. I use Pages, and sync it to a Box.net account using WebDav. I'm also in the process of writing my first novel, also using Pages. So far it meets all my needs. I believe that publishing a book written with Pages (digital or paper) won't be too difficult if you just focus ...


2

I own a 64 GB Transformer Prime and I love it! I'll never own a laptop again. It's an excellent device for screen typing and it is the fastest Android device that I've used. It is a bit expensive, but the investment to productivity and portability is well worth it for me. The number of alternative keyboards available is also a big plus. I prefer Swype ...


2

I'm a big fan of the Asus line of devices. Touch typing is getting much better and their accessories are right on par with Apple devices in my opinion -except cheaper. The iPad still probably sets the bar as far as user experience goes, but the ASUS Transformer Prime is a very strong competitor -that would be my current recommendation. Here's a CNet ...


2

If you're only concerned about the writing and battery life and not other tablety stuff, and you don't mind hacking it a bit, some folks on XDA Developers recently got a Nook Touch to support a USB keyboard. I plan on investing in one of these myself soon, since the eInk screen should be easier on my eyes than a regular monitor.


2

I prefer a buckling-spring keyboard like the old IBM Model M or the ones made by Clicky Keyboards. I only wish I could find that feature in a more ergonomic layout. Buckling-spring keys provide better tactile feedback than bubble keyboards, and I find that causes me to type faster and more lightly (rather than mashing the keys), easing strain on my hands ...


2

As usual, the answer is "depends." For idea generation, capturing bits of dialog you overhear, writing copy - an iPad with an Apple Wireless Keyboard is hard to beat for portability. But, if you need to do a great deal of editing, nearly any desktop app will have it beat. I think as a tool for observing life it's excellent (and the iPad2 will be even ...


2

Just writing, no bells, whistles, games, internet? HP LX200 (it's a clamshell XT). Load it with WORD 5 for DOS or VDE editor, better yet with a few nifty editing Macros and you can beat the crap out of any Tablet (Mac or Android)... even though it's antiquated and superannuated. Or go back to the PSION 5MX (but with a fixed up third party flat cable). ...


2

For me, writing on the iPad (without a wireless keyboard) is somewhere between writing using the pen and typing on the keyboard. The reason I say this: it is harder to make edits on the iPad than on the computer. That makes you want to carefully choose your words and plan ahead a bit. I use Pages and Dropbox. The dictionary built into Pages is actually ...


2

I found that the iPad was not really a good tool for writing, or getting ideas out...at first. While I know this thread is fairly old, due to sheer use, i found myself using the iPad with an iPad keyboard case more and more for writing. I think that the more you use something, the better off you are with it. Furthermore, I feel that with Secunia for the iPad ...


1

I've used my iPad to write a lot of blog posts and a few articles. I haven't done any writing on it like for a book project. Mostly that's because the publishers want their funky templates to be used that only work in Microsoft Word. I can type about as quickly on the ipad virtual keyboard as I can on a normal keyboard (about 70 WPM or so). It requires ...


1

I had terrible tendonitis in both arms for a while, and I had to get a mega-customizable ergo keyboard. http://www.comfortkeyboard.com/ They are not cheap, but I didn't have to get CTS surgery either. :) You can rotate each of the three pieces to the point where you can almost type vertically. It takes a while to get used to, and most of my coworkers ...


1

My keyboard has to be hard (I want to feel typing) and heavy (not to fly away when I cough). It is enough.


1

I would vote up other votes instead of writing my own answer, but since I'm still new to this site, I can't do that yet. I vouch for the Asus line as well. I'm currently writing this post using my Asus Transformer Tablet. The Prime is the newer model and has some better specs. (I have the older model). When you look at getting the tablet with the keyboard ...


1

I moved to a Macbook Air. I know it's not a tablet, but for lots of writing, I didn't like the iPad and if I'm carrying the keyboard as well, why not the Air? It's about the same size as my iPad 1, and there are some great writing apps for OSX. I also use DropBox and Evernote to sync notes/drafts back with a home computer to keep a second copy in case I have ...


1

I carry my iPad at times when I'll be without power for a long time. My laptop will only last 2-3 hours, and sometimes I want to write or make notes for a longer time than that. I don't have an external keyboard, but I have considered getting one. If I type in landscape, I can type almost as fast as on a traditional keyboard, but the corrections take ...


1

I would say an iPad is good if you're writing a note, but not a chapter - the touchscreen lacks the tactile feedback I need to go to full touchtyping (for one, it's really easy for your fingers to wander.) Adding a physical keyboard solves that problem (and as others have mentioned, reclaims a lot of physical space on screen). I haven't tried one of the ...



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