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11

Probably by making it useful for you again. If you say that it helps you think, then make it easier for you to write by hand and let the results reward/condition you to write more often by hand. Thus, if you are asking for specific tips for writing with pen and paper, you might find the following aspects useful (mostly paraphrased from my blog/a book I'm ...


10

The aesthetics of writing in cursive are really a personal thing: some people appreciate the feel of a fine pen gliding over the paper, the line variation from an italic nib, and the shading of a nice ink, and some just don't. On the practical side: cursive writing came about because it is faster and easier to write at length than printing. While that's ...


6

A lot of people find it easier to write and keep their ideas flowing when they are writing by hand. Unfortunately, as you suggest, that makes it difficult to rearrange the order in which your ideas get written down. If you decide to introduce a character earlier in the story or if you decide you need to provide more information to an earlier portion of the ...


5

I have heard of people using 3x5 cards with good results (in case you are not familiar with them, "3x5" cards are made of card stock that measures 3 inches by 5 inches; it can be blank or have lines); it is pretty easy to put a single thought/sentence/paragraph on one card and reorder them in a stack or lay them out on a table and move them around in two ...


5

Here's a simple tip: use a legal pad (they are a little longer than standard notebook paper), and, on the first draft, confine your writing to the middle third of the paper (or thereabouts). This scheme gives you plenty of room to rewrite the paragraph on the same page, if you want to overhaul it. It also lets you add a paragraph before (or after) the one ...


5

I turn the book. I write what I can comfortably write at the top of the page, then turn the book and write "from the bottom up" or from the side in or from the middle out, whatever feels most comfortable. I number the sections to mark their order. But that is for a note book – a book to take notes in, not a grimoire to be passed on to my wizard successor. ...


4

This is one of those questions where everybody just has to go with their own personal preferences. My last choice would be trying to dictate. I tried Dragon Diction as well, but as you have already noticed, the pauses and the less than stellar word conversion rate make it too tedious. I have done almost all of my writing by hand and then transferred to ...


4

Almost every computing platform now supports some form of speech recognition software. If you can read your own handwriting, then that offers a cheap and relatively painless way of getting your draft into a text file. Obviously you should test the software you choose on a few paragraphs before committing to reading in all 25 pages. Some applications have a ...


3

You won't like this answer, but I'm going to give it anyway. The best way to convert handwriting into text is to type it up. Don't skip it just because it's a little tedious. Typing up work is a valuable opportunity for engaging with each word and sentence of the text. Scanning over the text on the screen isn't the same thing. I always use the typing-up ...


3

There is always the original "cut and paste". Write your ideas out, and, if you need to move stuff around, literally cut it up, and tack it down again. Once you have got the ordering you think you want, write it all out (you can scribble on the originals too, for minor amendments). Hopefully, you will then have something much closer. You can repeat the ...


2

I oscillate between handwriting and typing. I find handwriting preferable for first drafts or for getting ideas out, as I can simply scribble on the nearest piece of paper or notebook, have arrows going everywhere - it's beautifully unstructured. I like it for first drafts as well for the same reason as Steven - it slows down my thought processes, which I ...


2

Yes, I see a point to writing in cursive: I write in cursive on lined paper when I'm exploring an idea or writing-out initial ideas. I find that writing in cursive forces me to slow down to consider my thoughts, and take the time to write out an idea. As I revise, I cross out and rewrite, making the idea's development more apparent, which itself can ...


2

I haven't used cursive since graduating elementary school. We wasted so much time learning cursive. It's upsetting to think about the skills we may have lost out on because we were busying learning something outdated even then. Learning cursive still has its place though. It helps you develop a signature. It also helps when you have to read handwriting ...


2

The original purpose of cursive handwriting was supposedly that you could write more quickly. Another reason is that in old times, when people wrote with a quill, cursive writing meant that they did not need to lift their quill from the paper, thereby avoiding smudges and spots on the page. Of course, this is no longer an issue. In the 16th-17th centuries, ...


2

For communicating with others, as you mentioned in your comment, you should continue to use digital. It isn't fair to everyone else that they should have to suffer through your handwriting (assuming it is as bad as mine) just because you decided to abandon digital. I went through a similar situation recently myself. I found myself struggling to complete my ...


2

I would suggest that you discover your personal writing quirks. I will try to illustrate this with my own experience. Since high school, I had developed this habit to put aside a notebook (maybe an extra one left over from the school-work books) or a diary (maybe some complimentary office gift given to my parents) and use it to record my thoughts. It was a ...


2

I'm sure what's keeping you from writing is your question of 'How'. It's exactly like insomnia caused by worrying about not being able to fall asleep. I know, I've seen that. No, you don't need good pen and paper, not the least, good things to write about. Keep just about any usable article handy at all times; write on any surface around you. ...


1

I believe many people stop drawing as children when their preconceptions of what a drawing ought to look like (something like marvel comics?) doesn't agree with their ability to draw. I think that many people stop writing by hand when, at some point in school, they become disenchanted with their handwriting, because they never learned to master a style that ...


1

I've been keyboarding for so many years that my handwriting has deteriorated past "chicken-scratch" into "hieroglyphics." If I write out a thank-you for a birthday gift, it's usually illegible by the third sentence. I literally couldn't write without a word processor. The flexibility and ease of editing, error correction, and brain-to-page is immeasurable ...



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