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It is easy to imagine that moments of religious experience are great strum and drang affairs, but they are more often moments of quietness. Not the storm but the calm after the storm. Consider 1 Kings 19:11-13: 11So He said, "Go forth and stand on the mountain before the LORD." And behold, the LORD was passing by! And a great and strong wind was rending ...


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Hmm, the question is too broad to give a definitive answer. How would you describe any experience? It depends on the nature of the experience, the nature of the character, and the role of the experience in the story. If the experience was fundamentally emotional, like a character is sinking into despair at the mess he has made of his life and suddenly ...


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I'd write about a religious experience the same way I write about any experience. Something tangible happens, which the character witnesses, and his own behaviors change in some way. Check out A Prayer for Owen Meany, which begins like this: "I am doomed to remember a boy with a wrecked voice—not because of his voice, or because he was the smallest person I ...


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Simply and directly is usually the best way to write about religious experience. And focusing on the emotions. There are some classics on religious experience in real life (not fictional accounts) such as "Autobiography of a Yogi" by Paramahansa Yogananda and "The Varieties of Religious Experience" by William James. More contemporary accounts: "The ...


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The first-person part is okay, if you master the art of first-person POV. :p Here are a few examples of fantasy-based stories, in 1st-person POV : here For the character having your voice, it's not bad as long as you're careful about the Mary-Sue thing. Beware of that problem though, as it can lower the quality of your work....



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