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8

Sounds fine to me. The prologue and epilogue are literally before and after the story, so it's fine for them to be formatted differently or have a different POV.


5

In a sense, this is the whole point to an epilogue --if it had the same feel as the main narrative, it would just be the last chapter. Epilogues exist solely to solve the problem of authors wanting to tell the readers things that don't --for whatever reason --fit into the main framework of the novel (and the same is true for prologues). That doesn't ...


4

I would have thought that alienation and insanity are much better done using the first person than the third: you see what the character is thinking and feeling. The reader can be the judge of what is rational and what isn't, given the same information the character has. It doesn't mean the character is right. It doesn't mean the reader is right. Tension can ...


3

I think everything is doable, if the reader gets the feeling it is fitting. I see no problem in the approach to have the book in first person and switch to third for the finale.


3

Welcome to the site, Bruce! In this case, describing pain in the first is no different than doing it in the third person. The only difference would be that you would use 'I' rather than third person pronouns. Therefore, what it looks like you're really after is how to describe pain in general. As far as being impaled on re-bar goes... well, I think we ...


2

The writing of this passage depends on what you intend to underline; is the character under a lot of stress or would he rather describe the scene factually, as though detached from what he's experiencing ? If the scene intends to underline the horror of the moment, stick as closely as you can to what the character might be thinking/feeling at the time; at ...


2

Use whatever you think will work best for your story. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote all but two or three of the Sherlock Holmes stories in first person, from Watson's perspective, and you see the longevity and popularity of those works. There are benefits and drawbacks of any perspective, but no blanket rules. No one will think it's a problem if all the stories ...


1

Hmm, the question is too broad to give a definitive answer. How would you describe any experience? It depends on the nature of the experience, the nature of the character, and the role of the experience in the story. If the experience was fundamentally emotional, like a character is sinking into despair at the mess he has made of his life and suddenly ...


1

I'd write about a religious experience the same way I write about any experience. Something tangible happens, which the character witnesses, and his own behaviors change in some way. Check out A Prayer for Owen Meany, which begins like this: "I am doomed to remember a boy with a wrecked voice—not because of his voice, or because he was the smallest person I ...


1

There are several techniques for doing this, as Lauren Ipsum illustrates, but consider that the first person narrator is also a character and how they narrate the story is part of how their character is formed in the story. So if the narrator describes their physical appearance, the fact that they are doing so says something profound -- and not necessarily ...


1

Your narrator compares herself to others. I met Sandy at the coffee shop. I towered over her by a full head. Cheap and simple: Your narrator looks at himself in a mirror. In the bathroom, I ran a hand through my hair. Still black, just like my dad's, although thinner. He went gray early — nothing for me yet. I had my mom's blue eyes, which ...


1

One way out of this problem is to use the passive voice. It's the bane of fiction but it might be exactly what you need here. Present yourself has the object of the experience, instead of the subject. For instance: Lessons Learned. In order to work efficiently at the company, one has to increase their communication skills to the point where they can ...


1

I often describe the reaction to the pain and the action causing the pain more than the pain itself. You can say that it's agony, anguish, a tribulation, but it won't have an impact unless you focus specifically on what causes it. Focus on the sound of the words. Surge, gouge, sear, smolder, snap, plunge, slice, saw, splatter. I would also use thrust, but ...


1

I agree with Tommy in that visualization is key in describing anything from a first person point of view. He was also correct with the words: it's all about the adjectives and adverbs you choose to use. Some other good ones to describe pain are surging, tearing, wracking, burning, smoldering, piercing, unbearable, searing, etc. If you want to really give ...


1

Like all the other answers state, it's not a common thing to do, but there is nothing to prevent you from doing otherwise. A great example that I'd suggest you read is Italo Calvino's If on a winter's night a traveler. It's exactly what you are looking for. An entire novel whose protagonist is you. It is not only good received by the critics and readers, ...


1

I know it's two years later, but in case others have the same question... Just end it. Write in the first person, try and tie up any loose ends before the death. Then, BANG, your narrator is dead. Last page. Last sentence. Bang. The narrator never gets to finish the book. With this, you can get creative. Discuss chest pains, numbness in the left arm, ...



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