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16

The only thing that matters in planning, is doing it long enough to make you feel comfortable writing about your story. There are two types of writers, "With an Outline" and "Without an Outline". Try both styles and see which works best for you. It's important to figure out if you do your best writing with constraints or without them. Find a middle ground ...


15

It varies a lot - and by type of writing. I can do casual non-fiction writing fairly quickly, but more structured or formal work takes me longer (not just in the editing, but in the actual writing process). The professional writers I know point out that burning out is a bad thing (as above: 1000 words each day - or even 250 words a day - is a lot better ...


10

While I don't think those NanoWriMo tricks are good -- just trying to increase word counts -- I think there is something you can take away from NaNoWriMo: just write. Don't stop to edit yourself. Sit down with a kitchen timer, or the timer on your iPhone and set it for say, 20 minutes. Start writing and don't stop until that timer dings. Will this first ...


9

When I was studying sketch writing, we were taught to not worry about storylines and events, but rather about characters, relationships, and their motivations. The motivations then lead to some conflict and the personalities lead to a resolution. In sketch (essentially a five minute play that tells a short story), the arc was pretty much, introduce ...


9

An apocryphal story about Joyce A friend once found him sprawled across his desk, a figure of utter despair. "How many words have you written today?" he asked him. "Seven," the great man answered. "But that’s good for you, isn’t it?" "I suppose so," Joyce answered. "It’s just that I don’t know what order they go in." Copied from here I think ...


7

Some writers produce better stuff when they plan and outline and world-build a lot. They're sometimes called outliners. Some work better by just jumping in and writing (discovery writers). Everyone is different, but you can learn which one you are (or rather, where you sit on the continuum between the two extremes) by trying both, for example: I began ...


6

It depends. Personally, I aim for one to two thousand words a day. I know of one professional writer who goes for three thousand words a day (but, as she pointed out to me, this is her day job).


5

Your writing style is stream-of-consciousness, which can be hard to digest. (On the internet this is labeled "tl;dr" for "too long; didn't read.") I strongly suggest breaking this into several paragraphs. Second, you start out with how despite your objection to her color, she became an emotional bright spot — but you don't get to that until the end, ...


5

This may be an extremely subjective answer, but i find it easiest to get a chapter or two done, rather than a word count. It means there is a complete section to get a family member to read over, and if there is spare time in my sitting, i can go through and edit it. If you don't finish the chapter, just try finishing it (and the next chapter) the next day! ...


4

Your best bet is going to be to try and improve your typing speed. The fast you can type, the more you can write in a short amount of time. Also, you can try carrying a small notebook and pen with you during the day. Then you can write a bit during small bouts of free time - waiting in line at the grocery store, stuck in traffic, etc. Another way to get more ...


3

Benefits and disadvantages of writing goals--this is becoming a tough fight. We have procrastination, ass-kicking and getting things done in the right corner, and dull routine, writing with heart and originality in the left corner. or Kicking the muse vs Waiting till she comes (I am oversimplifying here. Use common sense to fill the gap. ...


3

On the extreme side, Lester Dent was able to write a whole Doc Savage novel in about two weeks, perhaps less. We're not talking great literature here, but he is generally considered to have written the best Doc Savage books (all of them were published under the name "Kenneth Robeson", and they came out monthly). They weren't all that long, so figure about ...


3

Different people do different things. I tend to plan, by starting off at blabbing at a piece of paper until i have the general idea of what the story shall be about, then plan it out a bit more and then i actually write the first draft of the story using my plans.


2

I do a rough outline, detailing things that need to happen as the plot progresses, but then I try to let the characters lead the way from one place to another. You really need some kind of outline in order to build the plot correctly. Certain things will need to happen to move it along, and it feels less contrived if you build up to those things. One ...


2

Just some remarks: Were you really touching any corpse, anytime? Because this metaphor smells foul. "Alone in the dark". I think it is a cliche. It is the name of well known legend among computer games, so this phrase induces feelings of a dangerous situation, not loneliness, loss and deprivation.


1

One of the things I had to do was to start scheduling time to write. It sounds a bit extreme, but it really started to work for me. My problem was figuring when I could realistically make time to write. I ended up getting up an hour earlier each day and using that time. If I wasn't able to do that, then I would try to add an hour at night after everyone else ...


1

Have you tried tracking your progress? Setting up a spreadsheet that graphs how many words you do each day, shows you averages, etc.? It's an awesome way to motivate yourself, as you see those numbers and totals going up.


1

I find that for longer works, it is a lot easier for me if I have an outline. I don't bother working up a full detailed synopsis, however. Instead, I just identify the key points of interest for each chapter. This usually helps me to think through the story line before I jump right in and start working on it. My epic fantasy novel ended up with 115,000 ...


1

Some people seem to like the Snowflake Method; maybe you can check that out.


1

If you haven't written a novel before, then I would actually recommend doing both the "outliner" and "non-outliner" method that others have talked about here. And even if you know you're one or the other, I'd still recommend trying to break that routine every once in a while - just to shake things up. I'm a hardcore outliner, but I find that writing stories ...


1

Most of the initial planning happens in my head - I have a 20 Minute walk to work every day, so over a week that's a lot of time to think. I then write out the outline and some points without any further planning. Just 3 or 4 pages to get the story itself nailed. After that, the planning starts. Checking if the plot itself makes sense, then adding the ...


1

It strongly depends on yourself, how much you need a synopsis to stay focused. One thing in my opinion is really important to plan before: You should know your main story arc and clearly know how to end it. Some novels I read had no really end to it, that was somewhat frustrating as a reader. Sidestories on the other hand will also come to mind, while ...


1

No one can answer that question for you. You need to write every day and find the best wordcount for yourself. As a 4 time winner of NaNoWriMo, I can honestly say that 1667 words a day for me personally is way too much. It's doable, but if I had to go one more day, I'd go insane. 1667 a day burns me out, even without a day job. On the other hand, I've met a ...



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