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8

It all depends on your particular niche. If it's a hot new field with few experts, then you can name your price. If it's a common segment and there are a lot of people (even if they just look good on paper) trying to move to the tech writing/editing side, then they'll often work for nothing just to get the credit—bringing the perceived value of the work ...


7

I've been doing freelance for a bit, and I've found that most of the sites where you have to bid for the work, the wages end up so low that it's not worth taking the project. My biggest suggestion, what's worked best for me, is to create a website. Once you've created a simple, uncluttered website, you can advertise your services on Craigslist or using ...


6

It all depends on how much work you want to do. If you're willing to put in the time and effort, you can make a decent amount of money doing freelance editing. But it takes time to build up a portfolio and a reputation. You're not going to jump into the field and start making a six figure salary. It's also going to matter how long it takes you to go through ...


5

We've had a variety of people here looking for places to find writers, and here's what's come up: In this answer, Crowdspring was recommended as a place to "crowdsource" writing. It's a writing version of 99designs, etc. This question was from a technical person asking for a copywriter. Suggested sources included textbroker.com and guru.com. Obviously ...


4

The question is who you want to write for. I read one of the major daily newspapers of my country every day. The articles appear well researched (and are well written), and I feel I learn something reading them. But whenever an article deals with a topic in which I am an expert myself, I see many flaws: false information, central concepts not touched upon, ...


4

It's a hard question to answer. I've set $20/hr as my personal goal for writing. And I'm making it, but it averages out strangely. I might spend twenty hours on a short story that will only earn $60 because I want exposure to a new market - I'm essentially using the story as an advertisement, not as a tool for earning money. I compensate for that by ...


3

I think the best way to evaluate a freelance site is the same as evaluating any other business: Talk with the people who've worked with them before and see what they think about them, search around for other references to them to see what negative comments they have, and check their local Better Business Bureau for comments. Don't be afraid to ask writers ...


2

The easiest way to do this is to create a profile on a site such as Elance. Once you've done so, you can immediately begin bidding on jobs from clients around the world. This is where I got my start as a freelance writer after college and my first job was for a start-up in Singapore. However, the vast majority of the jobs posted on these sites offer very ...


2

For vocabulary, find your word in this frequency list (really a ranking): http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Wiktionary:Frequency_lists#English For every thousand in a word's ranking beyond 4000, cut your expected readership in half. I just made up that equation based on whim. If your whims differ, adjust the equation to suit.


1

In terms of market research it sounds like you have identified the niche that you want to target but have come up dry on what to do next. Working with the information you have given me you seem to want to write about TV shows (nice choice) and need to find a buyer for those writings. The question is then who would buy such work? Here I would suggest that ...


1

If you offer a free license, I would ask people you know directly. Easier and more promising than online. Sites taking licenses as payment do not exist as far as I know. But there are free services out there. Maybe you want to check them: PaperRater Kibin I haven't tested any of them. Also take a look at the Startups StackExchange site.



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