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Because I can't ask questions (system won't let me), I'm going to assume you mean that within Scrivener, there is the insertion point line that blinks. When you say it is huge, the first possibility is that your zoom level is too high. In the bottom left-hand corner of the text block, you should see a percentage. Try reducing that to see if that solves the ...


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Scrivener has a learning curve but there are a number of good online courses that will get you going if you have not used it before. I took the course offered by Gwen Hernandez and it was very good, but there are others. My process is: Write the book in Word Import the book into Scrivener Divide the Word documents into chapters Format the chapter headings ...


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There are different ways to format written text. Examples include: Quotes: A warning etched under the sign read “Electromagnetics strictly prohibited.” Italics: A warning etched under the sign read, Electromagnetics strictly prohibited. Special formatting: A warning etched under the sign read: ELECTROMAGNETICS STRICTLY PROHIBITED In ...


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Have the Viewpoint Character Take Action Bill approached the sign and read it: Georgetown County Fair. He scratched his head. "Georgetown? I thought this was Mapleville." Use italics for the sign if possible or use single-quotes. Even If You Don't Use the Word 'Read', It Works Notice how if you have the viewpoint character take the action, you ...


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You're probably in Script Mode. In my version of Scrivener (Mac) you can press command-8 to switch back and forth between modes. (I.e. prone opportunity for mishaps...) You should also be able to uncheck it by selecting: Format > Scriptwriting > Script Mode. It should be checked if this is your problem.


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Start >>Control Panel Accessibility Options >> Display (tab). Under "Cursor Options", move the "Width" slider all the way to the left (narrow) and click APPLY. For further information, you may refer to the following article: Accessibility in Windows XP


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The best approach is to query the agent first and ask them what their preference is. It is unlikely that they all have the same policy. Asking them first shows them that you are aware of the issue and willing to adjust if required. That shows professionalism, which counts for a lot with agents.


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These are two different "form factors" in my view...one involving the cognitive science of "reading" the other in the expression of an image to produce an emotional reaction. Obviously this is all up to the creators discretion in both instances but to "end a scene" as it were I would ask "to what effect?" Is the purpose to end the entire artistic enterprise? ...


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It's ultimately up to you, but genre and pacing may influence where you place your chapter breaks. A chapter can be as short as a sentence or it can be several thousand words long. Shorter chapters will make your novel seem more fast-paced. Thrillers frequently end chapters on a cliff-hanger to encourage you to keep reading. A long fantasy novel, on the ...



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