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Alright, here I go: Don't put "englishness" in every sentence (i know you won't) Maybe you could put it in italic. (I personally would put because is foreign) If you are worried about the non-speakers of english, put a note with the meaning, but just if is a difficult word or expression. (A lot of notes distract the readers)


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I was taught to handle foreign languages (and this would include pidgins) as grace notes in the prose and dialog: there's enough there to remind the reader that characters are speaking a language other than English, but not so much to hinder the reader's progress. So once you've made it clear that the characters are speaking the pidgin, most of the dialog ...


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I think the short answer is, Put the word in all caps. The criticism of all caps is when you write your entire text in all caps. Indicating that one WORD should be emphasized is perfectly reasonable. TRYING TO EMPHASIZE EVERYTHING YOU WRITE BY PUTTING WHOLE SENTENCES IN ALL CAPS IS USUALLY DISTRACTING AND COUNTER-PRODUCTIVE. Well, if you are writing a ...


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In Winnie-the-Pooh (or something of a similar genre) there was a Habit of capitalising important words to emphasis its importance to the narrator. e.g. After all he really was A Very Important Bear. I think this works a lot more subtlety than all caps, which tend to jolt you out of the flow of reading. Capitalised words can be absorbed as part of the ...


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Writing a word in ALL CAPS might be frowned upon because it is considered a visual equivalent of shouting, but shouting is a spoken form of emphasis, so ALL CAPS might be just what you need. Internet tradition (dating back to list serves, etc.) has used the underbar as a signal for italics: I will _never_ eat another steak. The underbar harkens back to ...


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I agree that 2.0 is the standard - at least for Humanities PhD production and academic writing. It is assumed then that a piece of work can be printed and commented upon 'in the space' surrounding the text. Gutters and margins likewise are typically specified.


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Although with respect to the post by "what", I must disagree that leading is defined by the user. Most users have very little knowledge of adjusting their browsers anything beyond default. This leaves the decision of leading to the blog writer, who may or may not be skilled in CSS to be able to alter it. As such, standard typography conventions for leading ...


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Are you in the United States or elsewhere? The United States colleges and universities favor a writing style called MLA or Modern Language Association -- they publish their own style guide which give extremely detailed instructions on how to format a paper for academic purposes. After undergraduate work, most people involved in writing default to their ...


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The "appropriate" leading on websites is that defined by the user agent. Unfortunately a large number of web designers appear to be unaware of the fact that users use a wide variety of operating systems, screen sizes and web browsers. The best usability experience is that provided by user agent standard settings. Unless you are very sure what you do (and ...


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It's a judgement call. You can certainly combine dialogue and actions in the same paragraph, and it's generally a good idea to do so when writing about someone giving a speech. But as you said, the "wall of text" is also a potential problem. The speech your character is giving will probably have separate ideas in it, times when you would make a paragraph ...


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I have seen quite effective layouts where articles are thrown in with mixed “media” like recipes, lists, maps, things to do, drawings, opinions…


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Perhaps you could interrupt the dialogue with dashes wherever the action is performed.


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Remember the guideline about every "scene" has to contribute to the overall story you're trying to tell. Any chapter that doesn't further the overall story in some way should be cut. This means that every chapter has a little part of the story to tell. And as soon as the chapter has told its part of the story, it should end. I disagree about keeping them ...


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If it were just a word in a foreign language, then yes, italicize it. But the word has been well known and used in English for about 70 years, and English is very flexible when it comes to stealing words from other languages. I'd say that — though it have begun life as a Deutsche abkurtzung (German abbreviation) — by now it can be considered an ...


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It's good to change up the structure for every few articles, so they don't bore the reader with all the same format. Other than that, I think it would have to do quite a bit with your target audience.


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No, it shouldn't be. It's a word that a majority of the English speaking population is aware of. It stands for National Socialism in English, or in German, Nationalsozialismus. It's a different usage of Nazism. In any essay I wrote, I capitalized it as a proper noun but never italicized it.


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I've seen this done either as a directive in the dialog, or as an action description beforehand. It's such a rare case though, that I'd be surprised if there was a clear standard for it. I haven't seen the side by side column thing out in the wild, but I'd wager the meaning would also be pretty clear if I did. So, I've seen: AMY ...


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As an alternative to footnotes, you could just immediately translate the first few statements containing a new pidgin word, perhaps putting the translation in italics. For (an extremely made-up) example: "Jah, got might owie in me gulliver", said Collins. God, my head really hurts. Used sparingly, this might serve as a less intrusive way of expanding the ...


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There are a number of variations that are recommended in various on-line screenwriting guides, including side-by-side or linearly but using a directive like 'during' At Story Sense they say When writing dialogue in two columns to indicate simultaneous speeches, the left margin of the first dialogue column must be inset slightly. It must not start in the ...



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