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10

Capitalize it: the Darkness. I believe Tolkien did this with the Ring. It's the common way in fantasy (and christian religion: some god versus God).


8

Capitalizing it is good, but coming up with another name for it is better. Churchill famously called it the Black Dog. Yours could be the Black Oil, or Dark Oil, or Devil's Touch, et cetera.


7

Format it the same way, with blockquote indents, and if you can add a little dialogue before and after, you don't have to worry about weird quote mark placement. Bilbo stood and cleared his throat. "I have a new poem for you all," he announced. "It goes thus:     All that is gold does not glitter,     Not all ...


5

I am assuming that your organization does not have an official style guide, or that this is a personal project. (If you are bound by a style guide, consult it.) I am also assuming that you aren't using a semantic markup already; if you're using a DTD/schema/tool/markdown that already has a notion of "keyboard input", you'd use that unless there's a good ...


4

It depends on the publication. For example, in many novels I read half the size of the normal font would make it unreadable. Double indenting is common. Italics or a script font for a letter is common. I have seen a number of different formats. It also depends on whether the whole of a letter or only part of it is being quoted. Sometimes, if a letter or ...


4

For this specific case, I don't see a reason to set it off. In fact, I would likely find emphasis-by-formatting distracting. Here's why I don't think you need to do anything special: You've already mentioned the darkness. You've described it in a vivid, visceral way. Then you immediately refer to it as "this darkness." Readers will know that you're ...


4

Typically, italics indicate when a word is being used in a non-standard manner. This seems to me the best choice for the examples given. I could see capitalizing if it was being anthropomorphized or used as a title ("The Darkness"), but that doesn't seem to be the case here. So you have no choice but to fight alone. Fight this darkness alone. ...


4

You don't capitalize the dialogue tag she said or she laughed if it's attached to your dialogue. You would only capitalize She laughed if it's a new thought. So: "Do you know where we are going?" she said. "We're going to Albuquerque," he responded. "Seraphina!" the dark Persian man cried. BUT "Do you know where we are going?" She ...


4

If you indent paragraphs, every paragraph gets indented, period. It doesn't matter if that paragraph is a single word of dialogue, a page-long rant, or four pages of stream-of-consciousness. So:     "Hello."     "Hi."     They were sitting on the bench, feet naked against the ground, ...


3

Both your second and fourth examples look natural to me. Including the upside-down question mark might be slightly preferable, but sometimes adding a little-used character can add to the expense and trouble of printing a book. That said, styles for punctuation vary across countries, across different publishers, and even between different editors. If you are ...


3

Side by side dialog. The screenwriting programs have a command to move selected paragraphs from inline to side by side. Very straightforward.


3

The subdivisions of a chapter, signified by an asterism (⁂), dinkus (* * *), or extra space, are called sections.


3

You'd use the character name. Most screenplays are written well before they're cast, so it would be impossible to use the actor name. And even if you knew the actor (like, it was part of a series) you'd use the character name because it's the character saying the line, not the actor. ETA: You can see this, for example, in the screenplay for Empire Strikes ...


3

The way I did my last Kindle book was this. I'm at a different computer right now so I don't have the files, I don't remember the extensions and all. If I'm misleading you on details, let me know and I'll go back and confirm. I downloaded the Kindle previewer. Then I sent KDP my docx file and got back their conversion, which I used as a first draft. This is ...


3

That table is not client-ready. I understand the technical terms like “dropdown” and “textarea” but those words should never be put in front of a client. Except for the rare exception who has some programming experience, at best the client will get nothing out of it, and at worst, they will have a really uncomfortable experience and resent you for it. I ...


3

I think what you have in your example is fine. Quotes don't have to be strictly spoken dialog. You've indicated in narration twice that it's written on the sign. The reader will understand.


3

It's ultimately up to you, but genre and pacing may influence where you place your chapter breaks. A chapter can be as short as a sentence or it can be several thousand words long. Shorter chapters will make your novel seem more fast-paced. Thrillers frequently end chapters on a cliff-hanger to encourage you to keep reading. A long fantasy novel, on the ...


2

They are two different programs for two different tasks. Scrivener is for writing your text. InDesign is for laying out the completed text after it's written and edited. I have written fiction in InDesign, but I'm also a production artist and I spend so much time in InDesign that I'm very comfortable in it, so I don't mind using it as a word processor ...


2

If it's something that big I would blockquote it (as you've done here for your post) and indent it, and then leave off quotes. It's not dialogue, which has specific practices for multiple paragraphs in a row, and I'd be worried that my reader would forget that I'm quoting someone.


2

I think there's a misunderstanding that you'll have to convert your manuscript to the appropriate file format yourself. You won't, though. Authors simply feed a clean file in accepted formats into the KDP, and the conversion to the appropriate file format for wide use across their platforms is automatic. That being said, having a clean file, without a lot ...


2

Nursery rhymes should be formatted the same as any other poems. As a block quote, each line of poem is set on its own line, matching the formatting of the original as much as possible. (This includes indents at the start of each line, as in George Herbert's "The Altar".) No quotation marks are used. Except for the quotation marks, the example in the ...


2

I can think of a few options: Indent the story-within-a-story and treat dialogue normally (just double quotes). Put your Aesop section in italics, the story-within-a-story in book, and treat all dialogue normally. Use some kind of scene break formatting (extra returns, a dingbat, a string of * * * * ) to indicate "this is the story within the story" and ...


2

If it's a spec script and breaking it down into multiple scenes would be unnecessarily burdensome on the reader, you may simply write: INT/EXT. - MONTAGE TVs around the world, in bars, homes, and storefronts relay the same news story. REPORTER You join me live at Houston Mission Control where we await contact from the brave ...


2

Most universities have a style guide that you must follow when writing your thesis. When my wife wrote her thesis, she was required to follow the MLA style guide, which is where the rules for indentation and spacing, etc. are found. I'd go to either your thesis committee or to your university's library to talk to somebody about the submission requirements. ...


2

Have the Viewpoint Character Take Action Bill approached the sign and read it: Georgetown County Fair. He scratched his head. "Georgetown? I thought this was Mapleville." Use italics for the sign if possible or use single-quotes. Even If You Don't Use the Word 'Read', It Works Notice how if you have the viewpoint character take the action, you ...


1

The annex is a separate, standalone document, with information that supports your thesis, but is not part of the thesis.


1

If the thought interrupts the description the way a piece of dialogue does, you can italicize. (Some writers use quotation marks instead, while still others capitalize the thought like a quotation, but without the quote marks.) The point of italics is to separate the character's thought from the rest of the text and avoid any confusion between what's going ...


1

It depends on what style you're using. If the number in square brackets indicates a superscript number for a footnote, it goes after all punctuation (including any quotation marks). The Chicago Manual of Style recommends that footnote numbers follow all punctuation except a dash. She said, "It is wrong to write on a Wednesday."2 This is exactly what ...


1

As a typesetter, I would put the number after the period, no space, and then superscript it: this is a sentence taken from someone.[2] I feel like this is the most visually pleasing, since the footnote is snugged up to the period, doesn't leave ugly white space under it, and is smaller so it doesn't draw so much attention to itself. Whether this is ...


1

I'm not aware of any particular consensus, so I think you should pick what works for you. I like the idea that you can nudge, push, or slam an option and each one means something different (even though the electronic action is the same). If the personality performing the action has sentience and intelligence, and particularly emotion, then those differences ...



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