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10

Capitalize it: the Darkness. I believe Tolkien did this with the Ring. It's the common way in fantasy (and christian religion: some god versus God).


8

Capitalizing it is good, but coming up with another name for it is better. Churchill famously called it the Black Dog. Yours could be the Black Oil, or Dark Oil, or Devil's Touch, et cetera.


7

Writing a word in ALL CAPS might be frowned upon because it is considered a visual equivalent of shouting, but shouting is a spoken form of emphasis, so ALL CAPS might be just what you need. Internet tradition (dating back to list serves, etc.) has used the underbar as a signal for italics: I will _never_ eat another steak. The underbar harkens back to ...


7

Format it the same way, with blockquote indents, and if you can add a little dialogue before and after, you don't have to worry about weird quote mark placement. Bilbo stood and cleared his throat. "I have a new poem for you all," he announced. "It goes thus:     All that is gold does not glitter,     Not all ...


5

There are a number of variations that are recommended in various on-line screenwriting guides, including side-by-side or linearly but using a directive like 'during' At Story Sense they say When writing dialogue in two columns to indicate simultaneous speeches, the left margin of the first dialogue column must be inset slightly. It must not start in the ...


5

I am assuming that your organization does not have an official style guide, or that this is a personal project. (If you are bound by a style guide, consult it.) I am also assuming that you aren't using a semantic markup already; if you're using a DTD/schema/tool/markdown that already has a notion of "keyboard input", you'd use that unless there's a good ...


4

For a printed book, consider a fixed-width font like Courier. Or you can get fancier and use a font designed to look like 1990s computer text. I know that computer text doesn't look like that any more, but readers will make allowances. For e-books, you may not have any control over the font that the reader sees. But you can try all caps, adding left and ...


4

For this specific case, I don't see a reason to set it off. In fact, I would likely find emphasis-by-formatting distracting. Here's why I don't think you need to do anything special: You've already mentioned the darkness. You've described it in a vivid, visceral way. Then you immediately refer to it as "this darkness." Readers will know that you're ...


4

Typically, italics indicate when a word is being used in a non-standard manner. This seems to me the best choice for the examples given. I could see capitalizing if it was being anthropomorphized or used as a title ("The Darkness"), but that doesn't seem to be the case here. So you have no choice but to fight alone. Fight this darkness alone. ...


4

It depends on the publication. For example, in many novels I read half the size of the normal font would make it unreadable. Double indenting is common. Italics or a script font for a letter is common. I have seen a number of different formats. It also depends on whether the whole of a letter or only part of it is being quoted. Sometimes, if a letter or ...


4

You don't capitalize the dialogue tag she said or she laughed if it's attached to your dialogue. You would only capitalize She laughed if it's a new thought. So: "Do you know where we are going?" she said. "We're going to Albuquerque," he responded. "Seraphina!" the dark Persian man cried. BUT "Do you know where we are going?" She ...


4

If you indent paragraphs, every paragraph gets indented, period. It doesn't matter if that paragraph is a single word of dialogue, a page-long rant, or four pages of stream-of-consciousness. So:     "Hello."     "Hi."     They were sitting on the bench, feet naked against the ground, ...


3

Short Answer.... Yes. Doable. But, there are a few other things programmers do... Formatting the Text with Decorators... Often times, computer errors will be presented with some type of inline decoration. It is generally safe to assume that putting the '>' character in front of every new line of text will help make your error text look like computer ...


3

The subdivisions of a chapter, signified by an asterism (⁂), dinkus (* * *), or extra space, are called sections.


3

Side by side dialog. The screenwriting programs have a command to move selected paragraphs from inline to side by side. Very straightforward.


3

You'd use the character name. Most screenplays are written well before they're cast, so it would be impossible to use the actor name. And even if you knew the actor (like, it was part of a series) you'd use the character name because it's the character saying the line, not the actor. ETA: You can see this, for example, in the screenplay for Empire Strikes ...


3

The way I did my last Kindle book was this. I'm at a different computer right now so I don't have the files, I don't remember the extensions and all. If I'm misleading you on details, let me know and I'll go back and confirm. I downloaded the Kindle previewer. Then I sent KDP my docx file and got back their conversion, which I used as a first draft. This is ...


3

Both your second and fourth examples look natural to me. Including the upside-down question mark might be slightly preferable, but sometimes adding a little-used character can add to the expense and trouble of printing a book. That said, styles for punctuation vary across countries, across different publishers, and even between different editors. If you are ...


3

That table is not client-ready. I understand the technical terms like “dropdown” and “textarea” but those words should never be put in front of a client. Except for the rare exception who has some programming experience, at best the client will get nothing out of it, and at worst, they will have a really uncomfortable experience and resent you for it. I ...


3

I think what you have in your example is fine. Quotes don't have to be strictly spoken dialog. You've indicated in narration twice that it's written on the sign. The reader will understand.


2

Are you asking if you can do it (from a publishing standpoint), or if you should do it (from a stylistic standpoint)? If the former, sure, there's all sorts of books published with atypical formatting in whole or in parts. House of Leaves would be the obvious example of doing that extensively; then there's also something like The Neverending Story which ...


2

I agree that 2.0 is the standard - at least for Humanities PhD production and academic writing. It is assumed then that a piece of work can be printed and commented upon 'in the space' surrounding the text. Gutters and margins likewise are typically specified.


2

Are you in the United States or elsewhere? The United States colleges and universities favor a writing style called MLA or Modern Language Association -- they publish their own style guide which give extremely detailed instructions on how to format a paper for academic purposes. After undergraduate work, most people involved in writing default to their ...


2

No, it shouldn't be. It's a word that a majority of the English speaking population is aware of. It stands for National Socialism in English, or in German, Nationalsozialismus. It's a different usage of Nazism. In any essay I wrote, I capitalized it as a proper noun but never italicized it.


2

Nursery rhymes should be formatted the same as any other poems. As a block quote, each line of poem is set on its own line, matching the formatting of the original as much as possible. (This includes indents at the start of each line, as in George Herbert's "The Altar".) No quotation marks are used. Except for the quotation marks, the example in the ...


2

I think there's a misunderstanding that you'll have to convert your manuscript to the appropriate file format yourself. You won't, though. Authors simply feed a clean file in accepted formats into the KDP, and the conversion to the appropriate file format for wide use across their platforms is automatic. That being said, having a clean file, without a lot ...


2

If it's something that big I would blockquote it (as you've done here for your post) and indent it, and then leave off quotes. It's not dialogue, which has specific practices for multiple paragraphs in a row, and I'd be worried that my reader would forget that I'm quoting someone.


2

They are two different programs for two different tasks. Scrivener is for writing your text. InDesign is for laying out the completed text after it's written and edited. I have written fiction in InDesign, but I'm also a production artist and I spend so much time in InDesign that I'm very comfortable in it, so I don't mind using it as a word processor ...


2

I can think of a few options: Indent the story-within-a-story and treat dialogue normally (just double quotes). Put your Aesop section in italics, the story-within-a-story in book, and treat all dialogue normally. Use some kind of scene break formatting (extra returns, a dingbat, a string of * * * * ) to indicate "this is the story within the story" and ...


2

If it's a spec script and breaking it down into multiple scenes would be unnecessarily burdensome on the reader, you may simply write: INT/EXT. - MONTAGE TVs around the world, in bars, homes, and storefronts relay the same news story. REPORTER You join me live at Houston Mission Control where we await contact from the brave ...



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