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8

You can do both. Use the tiny URL as footnote and provide an appendix/bibliography with the long URLs. Also an accompanying website could list all URLs used in the paper. Tiny URLs have the problem that they disguise usable information for the reader. They do not see immediately if you cite Wikipedia or MIT. This is of course not the case if you mention the ...


6

I don't mind footnotes if they are of the sort that are shown at the bottom of each page, so I only need to move my eyes down a bit to figure out what the footnote is trying to tell me. As for endnotes, the ones that are only explained at the end of the chapter or, worse, at the end of the book -- I can't fathom who actually reads these because they are so ...


6

The issue here is that you are referencing a written piece of work, and the URL is likely to be integral to that reference. While the shortened URL does direct you to the location of the work you are citing, the shortened URL is (with few exceptions) not the source of that reference. At best, the shortened URL points you in the direction of the work in ...


6

I've seen the citation "(—ed.)" short for "editor," meaning "the editor added this on top of what the author wrote." The format is something like TEXT One of the best-known quotes from Star Trek is "Scotty, beam me up!"(1) This basic command has become a cultural meme, and occasionally a frustrated commuter's lament. FOOTNOTE (1)Although much like ...


6

If I understand you, you are writing a book and you have both your own citations and quoted material with citations and you want to distinguish the two types of citations. Is this correct? I don't see much need to distinguish them -- they are all just reference material, put them all in the end-notes (I hate numbered foot-notes personally, they're very ...


5

Provided you mean that footnotes are only for translations (that is, you're not using footnotes for additional information or for source citations), I'd put the glossary of translations at the beginning, and skip the footnotes. The glossary up front will alert the readers that foreign words are coming up in the text, and putting everything in one spot makes ...


5

I use foot-notes, if at all, for explanatory material that cannot be fit in-line, but that would help the reader with understanding what he is reading; end-notes are for citations -- the dead-tree equivalent of hyperlinks.


4

CMOS says periods and commas go inside. It doesn't make sense, to me, but that's the rule. Bear in mind that this does not apply to question or exclamation marks, which only go inside the quotation marks if they belong to the words being quoted. There's a fairly interesting discussion on this, here.


4

Edward Tufte proposes a fascinating idea of sidenotes (link) which are literally over on the side of the page, next to the text they're related to, rather than at the bottom of the page. If you have enough control over the layout of the page, sidenotes can be very pleasantly readable and minimally disruptive to one's train of thought.


3

Personally, I would reconsider marking it with the same footnote marker, and rather mark them as 1 and 2, with the 2nd one consisting of the word "Ibid." Ibid means "the same place", and is "used to provide an endnote or footnote citation or reference for a source that was cited in the preceding endnote or footnote". If you reference the same source more ...


3

You are right. "ibid" is short for "ibidem", meaning "in the same place". It is used to not repeat the same title again and again. Also have a look at this question: Vancouver system, citing multiple sentences from the same book


3

Close to one of the other answers, it is quite common to use EN: meaning Editor's Note AN: Author's Note TN: Translator's Note PN: Publisher's Note but make sure to write them in full the first time they are encountered in your book Another solution is to use a different kind of symbol (for instance numerical for one kind and alphabetical for the ...


1

Your example confuses the issue just a bit. There is a difference between print documents that are available online, and online articles. In the former case you don't need to give a link at all, and when you do, you are doing it simply to make the document more accessible. In this case you can use any link shortener that you like. The url is irrelevant to ...


1

The key to your question lies in the phrase no changed meaning by standardizing. The designer of the original publication might have elected to set all article titles in a Gothic font to align with other design elements on the page. We do not feel compelled to retain that font choice when referencing the article; why should capitalisation be treated any ...


1

Footnotes should* be used for things like side commentary. They can also be used for brief references, if you wish. Endnotes should* be used when describing extended research material, an annotated bibliography/extended references and other longer notes that aren't considered brief side comments. *I say "should", but it comes down to what you're ...



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