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6

First impression: too many adverbs and descriptions, and too much detail. As Stephen King notes, "The road to hell is paved with adverbs." A few lines in, and I wanted to skip ahead. What's important to the story? The music he's listening to? Forty-eight steps? The people walking around? The pond? The fish? The coffee? The cigarette? Everything is ...


6

It very much depends on the quality of the contest, and that depends in turn on the quality of the judges and whether they provide any sort of feedback to the authors. "Did I win or not?" is pretty crude measure of quality. I was at the Writers of the Future awards ceremony recently here in Los Angeles, and I was struck by the fact that every winner ...


4

First, I would break it up into more paragraphs. That enhances readability. Second, using the adverb abstract is strange, but you do not gain surrealism doing so. You kicked me out of the story before I reached the first full stop (period, if you are an American). Talking about the story: There is none! justkt pointed that out already. Overusing ...


4

Not necessarily disagreeing with @Ralph's answer, but if you're interested in genre fiction you might want to search at Ralan's or Duotrope. (For example, Daily SF pays 8c a word for flash.) Many markets have upper limits but not necessarily lower limits for word counts.


4

There are very few, if any, paying markets for Flash Fiction. There's not really a large market for readers of flash fiction, so it's not worth the investment for most places to pay for them. A lot of authors usually only write flash fiction with the intent to give it away for free. It's a marketing tool. It gets the author's name out there and can get them ...


3

Not usually, in my experience, and the reason why is that they are usually judged by objective standards with an objective set of criteria and you're really only going to win the kind of contest with those kinds of guidelines if you tailor your writing to what the judges are going to be looking for. With this in mind, when you submit to that kind of a ...


2

There are quite a few paying markets for speculative flash fiction. Fewer for mainstream. And when I say "paying," that can mean as little as $10. However, look around and you'll find plenty of markets. Here's Absolute Write's list, but it's not all inclusive.


2

Where's the conflict in this piece? I see it as a piece of descriptive writing, perhaps a study in describing a scene, but I don't get a sense of movement and plot. Even flash fiction should have some sort of movement. To give a sense of the surreal cut out most of your adjectives and adverbs. Use them judiciously in an unexpected way so that a word like ...


2

College student (is Buck a student?) smoking a cigarette in public unpunished and enjoying Beethoven's music sounds quite strange and surreal to me. Since the paragraph doesn't explain why students were carrying those books I am not able to decide wheter it was for their interest of classic literature or for those books were just from a required reading ...


1

I'm not familiar with markets that specialize in flash fiction, though these may exist. However, if you feel you've got a worthwhile, marketable story, I think most venues are happy to consider flash fiction submissions. So if there's a market that would be appropriate for a story "if it were longer," it might be appropriate as-is, as well. I've seen ...



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