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8

Your title, first sentence, paragraph, page, and chapter are your hooks to catch the reader. Make sure they are baited well. So, if you start with internal monologue, it had better be interesting, not just bland, random thoughts about how it's high up on the wherever. I realize that was just an example, but compare: Bad: "It's so high up here," thought ...


6

There's no reason why it couldn't work, as long as you quickly make clear that it's internal dialogue. If it's a first-person narrative, the entire story is "internal dialogue," in a sense. The main benefit is to give the reader immediate access to the character's inner life, which may help us identify with him/her/it/them. The only real con I could see ...


4

Here is a mishmash of ideas... A common way to open is to state your conclusion as concisely and directly as you can. You don't always need exciting. Consider intriguing or surprising. Maybe controversial. What do you want the reader to feel right from the start? It isn't always excitement, but it's always some feeling. Curiosity. Outrage. Wonder. Humor. ...


1

The first sentence doesn't need to make the reader want to read the rest of the book. -- just the second sentence. And so on. For example, the opening line of The Hobbit: "In a hole in the ground, there lived a hobbit." The hobbit is thus introduced right away, but in a slightly deceiving way. Because in the next sentence Tolkien goes on to tell you ...


1

First of all, stop using the word "so" at the beginning of your sentences. The current fad of starting every conversation with "so" is pointless and practically idiotic, and letting it slip into written English is nonsensical. And please don't point out that there are reasons to begin sentences with "so." Of course there are. If you have a legitimate reason, ...



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