New answers tagged

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As others have said, the main conflict is what the main character wants and can't get. But I think the point that needs making here is about what plot is. I think it is all to easy to get into the habit of thinking of plot as a kind of history. You can meticulously develop an imaginary history and write it down, including lots of conflicts, without ...


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Honestly, I think you might be overthinking it and trying to use improper abstraction to understand detective fiction. So instead of explaining conflict in typical detective fiction, I'll use an abstraction I find more convenient, which should be broadly applicable to understanding the conflict if you wish. Hope it helps. thesis The society we live in is ...


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This related answer may help you, but I'll expand more here: I think it was J. Michael Straczynski, writer of Bablyon 5, who wrote that one could sum up "conflict" in three questions: What does the character want? What will the character do to get it? What will someone do to stop the character? As noted in some of the other excellent answers here, the ...


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My two cents! Which cost me significantly more after this morning's referendum result, mind you... What's conflict? Conflict exists when one desire is opposed to another. The opposing desires can belong to two different characters: Batman wants to punch Joker in the face But Joker wants to not be punched in the face Or the opposing desires ...


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If I were writing this story, I would have the character start Taking the Third Option (needless link to TV Tropes omitted). He is trapped in the room, and can either wait for help or go through the potentially dangerous robotics lab (with all sorts of power tools and mechanical arms to wield them as weapons), but he instead goes in the robotics lab just ...


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There is nothing wrong here it just feels you don't like your conflict to be nerve gripping and mind boggling. I understand your concern and find it very genuine cause as long as you don't satisfy your own nerve you won't be happy about what outcome will be. I know you never asked about probable conflicts but I wrote them cause I feel you are not happy ...


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Excellent question, to which you have partially provided your own answer, though you don't seem to realize it. You said: The goal is to catch whoever did the crime, or maybe prove he's guilty. There's nothing really standing in the way of that, unless you count the detectives' simple ignorance of all the facts. And that hardly seems like it could ...


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The previous answers are pretty good, contributing my penny. If you are writing a trilogy, you are talking about a specific set of characters which are time bounded (can exist for a specific period of time it's upto you to make them live in all 3 books and/or show their ancestors-descendants) in other 2 books. If you are depicting same people throughout ...


1

You can indicate attraction with nothing more than intense interest. If your characters are secretly attracted to one another, they will watch each other very closely. They will remember each other's likes and dislikes, even when mentioned in passing, and they may use this information to needle each other. Your POV character will think about Thomas a lot. ...


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Try gong deeper in the pov: 1rst person: Where was everyone? Had they all gone to a safe place that nobody told me about? I stared at my hands. Did anything in this world really belong to me? No, nothing did everything had turned to dust. Boyfriends and friends they possessed and accompanied me but nothing substantial. I sat down, and looked back at the ...


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It depends entirely on your story and what you are trying to achieve. Certainly, most trilogies and pulp series are chronological, but there are a number that flow between eras. The one thing they all need, though, is something to connect the separate eras/characters/stories together. One example is Traci Harding's Ancient Future trilogy, which tells a ...


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I often create characters, and factions for my stories before developing a more polished plot. Generally after creating a character I have a rough idea of where my plot is going, and what I want to do with these characters. From there world building takes over, and I make notes in Scrivener for future reference as I write the story.


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I think you really need to focus on those things that the friend can observe and then conclusions from those observations. This will likely make your descriptions concern the physical manifestations. Not "lust for blood" but maybe "behaving like a berserker" or "in a frenzy." What other odd things might the friend notice? And please don't rely on the "not ...


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Most trilogies or series follow chronological order, but there's no requirement. Do whatever serves your story. As long as it's clear to your reader what's happening when in relation to other events, you can present events in whatever order works for you.


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Some creators develop a mild case of schizophrenia. Or imaginary friends. Or Tulpas, if you like. They can distinguish and identify the imaginary companions, but these companions have own ideas, own opinions, own thoughts; quite rich to that; they are separate, fully-featured persons for all practical purposes, despite living only in the writer's head, and ...


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Story arises out of a challenge to character. The same event may challenge some characters and not others. A given character will be challenged by some events and not others. So, to create a story, you need a character and an event that challenges that character. Which comes first? In some cases, I am sure, the character comes first and the author must ...


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I like to do in person research. In my experience I've had many people more than happy to let me use them as the basis for a character, or learn terms I need to know. Try hanging out at the emergency room entrance, or visiting a burn ward, and asking the patients about their treatment. A lot of my soldier jargon I get from my friends and family who are ...


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As far as superpowers are concerned you are limited by your imagination. Extracting the substance dreams are made of, or reading minds, or changing form and appearance, being invisible, being at many places at the same time, time-travelling, controlling the elements fire, water, wind, space, earth could be some of the superpowers that come to my mind. Thank ...


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First thing of emergency treatment is vital signs and airway--blood pressure, heart rate, respirations, and pulse oxygenation of the blood. Burning gasoline will produce volatile vapors which will also cause inhalation injury to the laryngeal and pulmonary mucosa. A pulse ox less than 85% will result in intubation; otherwise supplemental oxygenation with a ...


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I really like writing hospital scenes. Can't help with the treatment, but from my experience there are two types of doctors: The sugarcoat These tend to have dialogue like "You'll be just fine!" and "It's not even that bad!" The honest one These people will tell it as it is, no doubt about it. They cut right to the point, and will not lie about the ...


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It is rather common for good feedback and opinion to be mixed. I can't really help you if you put it online, but if you show it to people you know well, you will be able to tell if they are giving good criticism and not opinion. This doesn't help, but I tried


2

If the reader is firmly in the character's POV, and expects to remain firmly in the character's POV, this is jarring and can throw the reader right out of the story. If the reader is firmly in an omniscient, opinionated narrator's POV, and is prepared to dip in and out of characters' heads, this works just fine. For this to work, you have to prep the ...


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You're fine. There are only so many plots, so go ahead and write the book you want to write because you love it. Remember that there are always new readers coming along who haven't read or seen all the other stories with that plot, so maybe for some people you'll be the first and The Hunger Games will be the cliché.


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So basically, the question is, how can she change her mind on fate, given that she takes every event that happens to her as fated? That's a tough one. Well, a turning point here could be an intellectual one. Let's assume, as you mentioned, she believes she's not fates to meet a kind man. Rather than having events prove her wrong by introducing her to a ...


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I don't think so. The hunger games surely weren't the first novel with this theme (there was battle royale, for example) but it works and people love it. Don't be afraid of overused ideas, because common themes are everywhere anyway, instead, try to make your book stand out because of the details, of the characters, the conflicts, etc. For example (and ...


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Yeah, I think its fine. Almost any idea is viable in fiction because well, its fiction. Don't worry at this point on people not understanding it well, because people will probably understand it if you explain it properly throughout the novel. That brings me to this point. You said you could not explain it well. I think that before you begin it, you should ...


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You say that the reader also don't really know the character vampirism, so are you just going to jump from nothing to your climax, where his vampirism will be revealed ? I mean, I think a climax is efficient when it comes after a crescendo : some indications of the character vampirism, growing suspiscions from the part of his friend. I also think it ...


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If this doesn't help, sorry. I tried. Just don't dumb it down too much. The guy doesn't know what a vampire is, but he isn't a complete imbecile. The readers already know what a vampire is, no need to explain it to them. Also: how does his friend know he has a lust for blood, maybe he's just really violent? Don't imply it right at the start. Usually ...


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Plenty of novels revolving around government conspiracies have been published already, just look at The girl who kicked the hornet nest and Soylent Green (those are the first examples I could think about). Your novel won't be seen as a radical, because it's fiction. If you wanted to write a non-fiction book presenting conspiracy theories as true, you could ...


1

I have not been in any kind of trauma, but here we go. You said the protag. is in shock. There is a change they would experience "survivor's guilt"(If I'm reading this right). It happens when everyone else in the party dies and the patient doesn't. The patient then tends to think it's unfair, and that they should have gone as well. I probably didn't help at ...


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The character doesn't have to be "normal" to be relatable. I have read books where the character is the leader of the rebellion and is still more relatable than a character I read that was middle school fiction. The character just has to have feelings that are appropriate for the situation, and have a well rounded personality. No one will relate to a Mary ...


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You said the scene was from the POV of the friend, who I am assuming doesn't know he's a vampire. Maybe instead of Red eyes and sharp teeth, you could describe something else. As for luster for bloof, maybe reword it? I'm pretty sure I didn't help at all, but,hey, I tried.


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It's absolutely fine. I have seen many famous authors end a book on a cliffhanger and no one cares. For example, Margaret Peterson Haddix (I think that's her name) wrote her book Turnabout, in which case it ends in total uncertainty with a cliffhanger. So yeah, go ahead.


1

Not unless it drives the story forward. Do not describe every outfit the MC puts on, puh-lease! It gets annoying. If they're looking in a mirror, maybe, but otherwise I don't see a reason for it


1

What I do is usually just sit down and write without thinking, then edit it later. I have a basic idea of a story, but it usually just happens as I go along.


2

When writing in first person, you would only write about what your POV character is seeing, thinking, feeling, experiencing. This means that unless she is looking in a mirror, or particularly self-conscious, she would not be thinking about her own appearance in great detail. This means that it would make sense that she would notice her friend's appearance ...


0

I believe you are too young to publish a novel. Look at work you have from a year ago, chances are you likely want to change it and don't like it. You aren't even in high school yet, you haven't had enough experience to write a great novel. Even for adults it is hard to find a publisher, chances are even slimmer if you are a child. You can write all you ...


0

Carpe Diem. it could summarize it all. Use your best ideas, while you're still enthusiastic about it, it will give you the enregy to write it down (and writing takes a lot of energy) You will evolve, as a writer and as a person, so trust your future self to find other great ideas ! Carpe. Diem !


1

Describe whatever the viewpoint character notices and has opinions about. In a naughty story, the characters might choose their attire to have certain effects on other people, or to express certain aspects of their attitudes, mood, or desires. Which means that the characters will have opinions about their attire and the attire of others. So describe ...


1

I've had a related discussion with my wife two weeks ago about whether there's anything significant about men writing a female protagonist and women writing a male protagonist. For example, Robin Hobb writing about FitzChivalry, or Witi Ihimaera writing about Paikea. In the end, my wife and I concluded together that the protagonist's gender is really only ...


0

It depends. If you're actually planning to publish that idea anywhere else than Wattpad, you might want to wait. No one is going to write a book to be published on his first try, no matter how talented he is. The first book you write might seem amazing to you at the moment, but look at it again one year later, after much more writing experience, and you're ...


0

men can identify and empathize with male as well as female protagonists, while women identify better with female protagonists (the claim being, they can certainly sympathize with male protagonists, but identification is harder). Anecdotally, I would consider the reactions of a percentage of male fans to the all-female Ghostbusters, Daisy Ripley's Rey in ...


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In any creative discipline you should absolutely work to the best of your ability at every stage of your career as your previous works are both your way to show the world what you are capable of and a platform for you to build on. Similarly 'ideas' are often a bit overrated, creativity is not so much about having brilliant flashes of inspiration so much ...


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Use them, before someone else does. If you want to do a "remix" later, you probably won't accuse yourself of plagiarism.


8

Use your good ideas. Just don't give away the rights to your creation. Make sure that you can re-use your story and elements. I've seen countless stories about people who made a wonderful classic early in their career. (I'm talking about creators, and not necessarily writers specifically. Could be writers, game makers, etc.) Then later in life, they ...


6

Ask yourself: how motivated will you feel writing about a mediocre story? To improve, you need to write—a lot. You won’t enjoy writing if you’re not passionate about your story. Pick your best idea, the one that sets your creativity ablaze, and write it. Make sure you finish it. If the writing is not good enough for publication, then move on to the next ...


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FWIW, here's my personal story that can perhaps serve as a teaching point in relation to the question: I wrote my first fiction when I was 6 yrs old - a 2-paragraph Donald Duck mystery I began writing short stories when I was 13-14 I won a small local award for a short story I wrote when I was 18 I began writing novels at that time, fully expecting to be ...


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Use your best ideas. Write them as well as you can. Yes, your writing will improve with experience. And your ideas will also improve with experience. If you reserve your "best ideas" until you're a better writer, then your early stories will exhibit neither your best ideas nor your best writing. Why hamper yourself like that? Sometimes people love great ...


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It depends a lot on the plot, the "genre" (I don't like this word too much, but there is a difference between pulpy science fiction and literary fiction), and other dynamics. For genre fiction (=science fiction, horror, fantasy, detective, etc.) stereotypes are generally expected. This means, characters should be rather clearly offered as good/evil, smart/...


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I think if you try hard to make a character hateable, most readers will hate him. And yes, it's good to have such characters in stories. If all your characters are nice and kind, the story might get a little boring. Those hated people are something different for your story. If you really want your readers to hate him, make him bully the protagonist or ...



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