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The less ordinary the better is what I think. Why would Joe Bloggs want to read a story about Joe Bloggs? Joe Bloggs would most probably enjoy the experience more if he/she were reading about Joe Awesomepants. Or, conversely, Joe Awfulpants. It is often the very high-achieving characters (richer than rich, powerful, slightly crazy) or the downright ...


1

There are several good approaches to this problem: Cite the actual author. This works if the story is set in a world that is descended from the world of the actual author, and if it is plausible that the provenance of the quote would have been passed down until the time of the story. Cite the actual author, but only give the author's initials. This can ...


0

Posting on other people's content may be seen as hijacking their audience to promote your own project. That's the only real ethical problem I see. So if you created your own blog, or commented in very public spaces that don't "belong" to anyone, you should be fine. As for it being misleading to children... you know what? So is every other form of ...


2

You should keep the quotation marks. If you believe that they will be distracting or disorientating to the reader, then don't take my word for it, try it yourself with an example: Look at the famous 'Heart of Darkness' by Conrad (the copyright has expired, so it is in the public domain and free to read). It consists almost exclusively of somebody on a boat ...


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The marketing department for the movie Ex-Machina recently did a similar thing, they made a Tinder profile for their main character and had her 'talking' with real people who were looking for dates, then ended up linking them to the website for the movie. This breached Tinder's Terms & Conditions, and I think there's now a massive lawsuit directed at ...


1

The problem I see is what you probably intend: that young readers will believe this person actually exists. Many adults take everything they find in writing at face value, apparently unable to imagine that people make up stuff and post it on the web. Children around ten years old ("tweens") have an even weaker ability to keep fact and fiction apart. My son, ...


0

I would say that you should let the story play out. If you are planning on writing a chapter book for children who are just learning to read, I would keep it around 200 hundred pages. It's hard to get a kid to willingly pick up a 500 page book. But, if you find yourself around 200 pages but have more of you story to tell, don't try to wrap it up to get a ...


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In my experience, whether a relation between the reader and the characters of a story can be established depends not so much on the accurate depiction of physics or any kind of back-ground but on the realistic psychological depiction of the character. Can I identify myself with the character? Can I understand what he is doing? (This is very different from ...


0

Just write the story and don't worry in the beginning about how many pages. The story itself will dictate when you should stop. Also, if you are looking at shopping it around to publishers they will let you know what their criteria are. Good Luck!


5

There are two issues here: legal and literary. Legally, if the quote has fallen into public domain, there's no problem. If not, you're into the whole nebulous area of "fair use". Someone could conceivably sue you for copyright violation for stealing his quote. As we're presumably talking about quotes that are a sentence or two and not dozens of pages, I ...


1

You could, but it is very disrespectful towards the one you steal the quote from. When the person is still alive or not dead for long, it might also be considered plagiarism to use something they said without an attribution. But Friedrich Nietzsche is dead for 115 years now, so in this case it is very unlikely to get you into copyright trouble.


1

In response to SaberWriters comment, I'd like to raise the question what a story is. As a a trained physicist, the answer to me is easy: Change, or, in the pysical setting, d/dt. Anything that is different at the end of the story from what it was at the beginning of the story can possibily maintain a story. This element - the aspect that changes - is what ...


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This question is analogous to the painting artist asking, should I use light blue, medium blue or dark blue for the sky I am painting? The answer is: use the color that the sky appears. You might say, "Well, the painter just looks at the sky and paints it the color he sees so that is a different thing." But the best painters do not only paint what ...


0

I would say it's better to start with neither; start with the story. Both setting and character should be introduced bit by bit, as the story begins to unfold. If you start with setting the scene or introducing the characters then the reader has to wait for you to finish before they get to read the story. Many publishers will only read the first few lines ...


2

Readers are different and enjoy different things. And stories are different and require different beginnings. That said, most people are more interested in persons than in environments, and character driven plots sell better. But it is best if you don't perceive this as either-or, but rather try to introduce both the character and the setting at the same ...


1

I know that John Green uses a real life quote in his book, Looking for Alaska and does not sight the quote in the text so, I'd say it is perfectly fine to have a fictional charter say a real life quote.


1

In general, for a passage create an emotional reaction, the reader has to be able to relate to it. First, determine the point you want to make. Next, make your point in a way your intended audience can relate to. Using metaphors helps, as does using visceral language that really drives home your message. For example, first determine if the point you want ...


0

I largely agree with this answer, to which I add: Order of perception by your POV character fits nicely into all the other stuff that you're telling through that POV, so it's a good place to start. On rare, special occasions, you can get extra impact by violating that: The cool breeze through the lush trees lining his path carried the scent of lilac ...


1

Hire someone else to do it instead. There are thousands of conlangers looking for work and eager to work on any project, whether it be a motion picture or a short story collection. You can hire conlangers using the LCS Jobs Board. That said, when it comes to using the language in the book, Card's advice is pretty good. Even being a professional language ...


6

It's vanishingly rare to need a constructed language in written fiction. Orson Scott Card sums this up in How To Write Science Fiction And Fantasy: Invented languages are a lot more fun to make up than they are to wade through in a story. Here's the thing: very few readers will have the patience for more then brief, occasional snippets of languages ...


1

I start my documents as "NameOfDocument 000.doc" (or similar, depends on software being used.) Every time I start a writing/editing session on the document, I do a "Save As" and increment the number, before doing anything else. I find the Undo/Redo commands to be sufficient within a session. Exception: If I'm about to perform major surgery, e.g., ...


1

I think git is a bit overkill, because you have to remember to commit it all the time it does not just happen like after a save. Options that I can think of Google Docs it has a Revision History view Microsoft word has Track Changes (I don't know much but one site I found ...


3

I use git for fiction. Sometimes I'll save versions at various milestones, such as when I finish a chapter). But more often I forget, and save a version only when I finish a draft. Some other times that I save versions: Before and after I apply my editor's edits. When I finish creating a book cover, book interior file, or epub file. Whenever I want to try ...


2

After reading the question and answer that Joel Bosveld linked to in his comment, I installed Git to do version control of the novel I was writing. If find the idea of version control intriguing, because I often rewrite parts of my fiction only to realize that a previous version contained some great phrases that I'd like to reuse but can not remember and ...


0

If you try this technique and find that it's clunky or confusing, you might want to frame the whole story with a narrator who is reading over the main character's diary and explaining it for the benefit of an eventual reader, giving context. This sort of device is often used when the author needs a lot of exposition, but the character would never give it.


1

I'm a 16 year old who often writes for fun so I don't know how much my opinion would matter. But I were to be in your situation, I wouldn't edit anything. That way the character's thoughts don't become you're pet peeves. Don't cross out anything, keep the handwriting and everything else. If the journal the that the jailbird is writing was supposed to be read ...



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