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Lots of names are short for longer names. Beth is short for Elizabeth. Nobody writes it 'beth. In English, when shortening a word by lopping off the beginning of the word, the tradition is to treat the shortened word as a full word in its own right, and to capitalize it as such. That said, lots of people have insisted on defying orthographic conventions in ...


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For this particullar example, the name is only expression, how to name yourself. If i will call myself LittleOgre, it will be my name or nickname too. So because of it i will use 'tina. And the second, I will rather use 'tina instead of Tina and 'tina. It can be rather confusing, because when you will tell about here you will use Tina, and when somebody ...


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In David and Leigh Eddings's Malloreon series, one of the characters, a ruler, styles himself ’Zakath, with the apostrophe. The characters under his rule use the apostrophe; those who oppose him don't, if I recall correctly. So those who do and don't use it say as much about the character as the apostrophe does: do you respect (or fear) the person ...


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Aside from issues of attention that Conn Warwicker brought up, you should also consider the aspects of time when composing these sentences. Given that you are separating dialogue specifically, readers are likely to infer a different passage of time with each composition. The first two examples, which correct me if I'm wrong, are the same. Imply a pause in ...


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I always knew I was ... unattractive. Say the word, my girl, say the word. Ugly. I thought I'd accepted it, almost relished it. It protected me from so much folly; allowed me to have so many friendships that I wouldn't otherwise have had. I didn't anticipate the burst of utter fury that ran through me when he let slip that remark. Poor sod, always in trouble ...


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Usually you'll be in your characters heads, telling the reader what they are thinking and feeling about someone as relationships grow, so the easiest thing to do if you want to ignore any romantic possibility between them, is just to never have either of them even consider it in their thoughts, or maybe just briefly and then dismiss it for whatever reason. ...


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That's very difficult to answer, as everyone reads things differently. For me, from your three examples, I got: This seems like the most natural to me, which doesn't overly bring more attention to the dialogue or the description. Brings more attention to the dialogue, as that is the first focus, then with description on the end, tailing off toward the end ...


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Characters need to separate themselves from the crowd at the right time. For instance, if there is a tsunami, or something like Hurricane Katrina, most people will behave more or less alike. And in most cases, it's perfectly ok for characters to be passive, in the sense of not standing out from the crowd. It's what happens "afterward" that distinguishes one ...


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I think maybe you need to look at the difference between being "passive" in the sense of not making decisions or "passive" in the case of not caring. The situation you've described seems like your character is the first kind of passive. If he's also the second kind of passive, things will be trickier. But if it's just the first kind of passive... if it's an ...


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You don't want your character to be passive throughout your novel, but I don't see any issues with him being passive in the first chapter if that sets the scene. A consistently passive or reactive character is hard to make compelling, but even the most proactive person sometimes finds herself in situations beyond her control. I just wouldn't extend it for ...


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The motivation doesn't have to be massive or book-spanning. As Cole correctly notes, it could simply be "getting to the door." Or "not getting an elbow in the eye." Or "not choking from the smoke" (or whatever the problem is that's causing the evacuation). Or conversely, maybe your character's goal has nothing to do with the situation he's in. Maybe he's ...


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Ask yourself who this novel is really about. If it's about the main character, presented in chapter one as part of a crowd, you for sure want to make him more of an active agent in the story. If it's about a whole bunch of people and you change from chapter to chapter, it's fine to make him a little more passive. Either way, you're thinking of this in the ...


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It's hard to give a completely accurate answer without the complete context of the character (her dialogue, her descriptions, how she views the world, and how specifically this situation unfolds) but the assumption of pettiness might not be wholly a symptom of likability, and more to do with how round, or fleshed out your character is. Ask yourself is this ...


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The problem isn't necessarily that the character is too mean, it's more likely that she doesn't have enough positive traits for that particular reader to enjoy a story with her as the protagonist. Different readers will have different tolerances. I'm guessing you enjoy mean characters, and some of your readers will probably feel the same way. But you ...


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I have and have always had many close female friends. I don't see what's so special or "difficult" about these relationships, they function just like any friendship I have with a man or boy. If you want to write about a male-female friendship, then just write a male-female friendship. No, I don't constantly wonder wether or not I would like to have sex ...


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First, why do you care? You say that you want the language to have a certain sound. Why? Does it matter to the plot? Or are you getting yourself distracted with creating this language rather than writing an interesting story? If you really think it's important ... There are many foreign words whose pronunciation is difficult to represent with conventional ...


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One possibility is: Just Do It. Write the story where they always relate to each other as friends or co-workers, and the issue of romance just never comes up. I've had many female co-workers over the years whom I have never thought of as potential romantic partners, and to the best of my knowledge none of them were pining away for me. Two: Give a specific ...


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Depends on the story and setting. Have them advise each other on romantic problems. Make her older or more mature than he is, which creates a gap that can close during the series. (You could try it the other way around, but sweet young thing and worldy wise older guy is still a trope, albeit an out of date one).


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Close male-female relationships that aren't romantic are challenging even in real life, let alone fiction, but they do exist. Assuming the pair isn't related, neither of them is gay, and they're relatively the same age, your readers will begin to long to see them together, just like their friends in real life would be likely to do. One way of dealing with ...


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Off the top of my head, CJ Cherryh's Morgaine saga (female mage, male assistant), three or four books, no romance. (removing this per @what's comment below) ETA so wow, it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought it was to find examples. Almost every story I can think of at the moment has either two people of the same gender, one gay protagonist, or two ...


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If it means that much to you, have a pronounciation guide up front — not an appendix, but before the main text. And then just sigh and accept that half your readers aren't going to get it right anyway.


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You could have an appendix (such as appears in the best-selling Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan) that explains pronunciations. However even that is subject to pismronunciation. Of course there already is a way to write these things. It is called IPA, the International Phonetic Alphabet. The problem is that most of us don't learn it at school. However, ...


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Do people using the constructed language use a Latin-based alphabet similar to English, or do they have an entirely different writing system? Spelling it "oddly" would make sense if the people literally use the symbols A-s-h-e or S-y-a-n to write their name. For example, they could be descendants of Portuguese-speaking people from Brazil whose language has ...


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Your suggested writing system is very confusing. I think what you need to do is come up with a list of the language's phonemes, and then use whatever is the most common way of writing that phoneme in English (if English indeed does have that phoneme.) Or why don't you just spell words the ways you wrote in the question to explain how they're pronounced? ...


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A few ideas: You could have a character who doesn't speak that language ask how the name is pronounced, or mispronounce it and receive a correction. Obviously it would look contrived for this to keep happening, but doing it once or twice would be enough to introduce the general rule. Use Matt Ellen's idea of a diaeresis / umlaut for the first two names ...


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If you don't want to use an apostrophe, then consider a diaeresis. It used to be common in English to mark vowels that come after vowels, but need to be pronounced separately, with a diaeresis for example: noöne coördinate Zoë Also, this format is used in Lord of The Rings, e.g. in Fëanor, to make sure the e is pronounced separately. (You can read this ...


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Oh goody, in this context you can do both. Would it not be absolutely horrendous for your protagonist to be first cured, then be eligible for trial and be sentenced to be chipped yet again Nice scene where he is dragged screaming towards the end, his body to continue but all of his personality to disappear into the void?


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That absolutely depends on your story. If it's important for the story, readers will be curious. But then, don't disappoint them ;-)


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Everything that happens in a story should happen for a reason. And the main reason is to impress the reader. That said, yes, you can kill your character, but only if you make it meaningful. Character deaths in stories have two reasons: to drive the plot forward and to evoke emotions in your readers. See George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire ...


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All people have a natural curiosity. The mystery genre usually preys on that curiosity, giving people a hypothesis and asking them one or several questions based on that hypothesis. This is the 'mystery'. Then they try to solve the said mystery in their minds and this involves them in the story a great deal. Because it makes the story personal for them. ...


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I am a young writer too! :) I've been creating a series with my best friend we are both young and I we found an author that have invested in us and has taken the time to really get to know us <3 What I've learned so far is to not fall down when people think your too young ;) one of my favorite Bible verses is: "Don't let anyone look down on you because ...


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I think what makes anything matter to readers is: it matters to a character that readers care about it matters to the character for reasons readers can identify with


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A common trap for novice writers is to try to build emotion by using lots of superlatives and exclamation marks. This is a case where the classic advice, "show, don't tell", should be considered. Don't just tell the reader that something is the biggest or the best or the ugliest. Describe it or show it in action so that the reader sees why or how it is the ...


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It depends of the emotions you are trying to evoke when the character explains his past. Do you want the others to pity him, to admire him? Is he proud or ashamed of himself? The style and techniques used can vary depending on that. Phraseology and sentence length come into this. For example: If I say something. Something short. But meaningful. It may have ...


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There are usually deeper reasons about why you get stuck writing a story. It could be that there just isn't enough tension (conflict) in the story to begin with. For example, can you imagine someone telling you a story that goes like this: My friend George was free climbing a cliff the other day. It's a terrible story that ended tragically. At one ...


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One thing that usually annoys me greatly in film is when there is a group dialogue and everybody is practically finishing each other's sentences without any pause. It's like one brain and 3 mouths rattling. The dialogue becomes unreal. How about having two people talk interactively, until there is a transition to a third person (the camera pans). Anna ...


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Just skip to the next plot point and write that. Chances are that later on you'll think of a way to bridge the two, and then you can come back and fill in the details when that happens. I would guess that very few writers proceed sequentially through an entire work. It's good to jump around when you're finding yourself stuck; there's no point in stagnating ...


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Do you have some other parts of the story worked out? I would just jump ahead for now and write the next scene that you "know". Then, before you know it, you can fill the gap.


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Sir, I don't wish to be harsh but you deserve honesty. Concerning yourself with world-building issues should not be your focus now. If English is your language of choice, your skills with the written word are not at the level they need to be. Your writing contains many grammatical errors that book-readers will not tolerate. You must first improve your ...


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In a script this is easy as all dialogue is simply tagged. But that comes across rather artificial in a novel. For this example I'd make it a bit more narrator-centric. Looking back and forth between Anna and Carl, observing and interpreting both gestures, facial expressions and spoken words. Reacting both to the conversation at hand and from the history, ...


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There's no hard-and-fast rule for how often to attribute dialogue, but the general goal is clarity. If readers are finding a section unclear, it should be reworked. In this example, I'd just add a few more tags. "Roses and a dead body?" Anna wrinkled her fine nose. "I don't see the connection." "And they came from Paris," I said. "How did it end ...


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What are your goals? Are you writing for entertainment, for yourself? If so, write what you want. Write the history, write a series of vignettes from the perspective of a prehistoric ghost of your world, write a new alphabet and language for each creature - write whatever makes you happy. If your goal is publication, ask yourself what kind of publication ...


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I have the same problem and still do. Readers are normally drawn to characters of setting and unique history...at least at first. Its better to develop the character in the early part of the book and then start incorporating all the new cool world building. Brandon Sanderson calls this World Builders Disease, you have it bad. As mention write a really cool ...


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If you write a history, it will likely be of interest only to yourself (or as preparation for your book). That's not necessarily a reason not to write it. JRR Tolkien put years of effort into world-building for his books, which is likely a key reason for their continued popularity. If you do go ahead and write your narrative now, don't make the mistake of ...


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In many (maybe most) cases over-research is a distraction our minds create to make us believe we are working on a project that we really don't want to write for some reason. It could be that we are afraid to write it because we have this beautiful idea of what we want and we are unsure if we could ever write it that well. The Best Advice The best thing ...


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If you're planning to self-publish, then you would probably have a much better chance of selling your work. Having said that, whether or not you truly find success will depend on how well you write, how ell you promote yourself, and what genre you choose to write in. Some genres, such as romance or erotica, tend to sell a lot of novellas. Some writers have ...


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The first thing you should ask yourself is whether or not the additional description helps to further the story. If it helps the reader get a better sense of the setting or mood of the scene, then you should consider adding it. However, if you are only adding it to increase the amount of content, then definitely don't do it. Your second example does do a ...


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It's a balance. When I read the first version, it just barely verges on being "too sensational", but it works. The second version offers an improvement of sorts, but phrases like "That's right" which Acknowledge how sensational/confusingly disparate the events are, instead of just letting the reader realize that for herself, are deleterious. I.e.: know how ...


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If the novel is good enough to get published, it won't matter how old you are. You'll just be that much cooler. I've been trying to get published since 12, like you—well actually 11—and I'm 17 now, still sans dice, as they say. I hope you have more luck. Don't ever give up. And maybe brush up on your homonyms ("too" vs "to"—though that's minutiae).


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Don't overreach. Phrases such as "I did. Not. Move." come off as a bit much, a bit dramatic. And I agree w/ the top answer, it does get a bit didactic towards the end. Illustrate inner conflict with outer actions; as a general rule, tend away from explicitly indicating the character's mindset. Of course there are cases where you must, but don't unless you've ...



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