New answers tagged

1

I think whether or not you can get the book “published” is irrelevant. I recommend you don’t even concern yourself with that. In the first place, you can publish it yourself, on your own website, or through iBookstore or Amazon. But perhaps even more important, the process of writing the book and expressing yourself and growing as a writer is the key thing. ...


1

You describe post-traumatic stress disorder. I would start with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV or V for psychiatry. The PTSD section isn't that long. However, I'll add "blocking it out" has been considered a medically incorrect concept for about 30 years or more and usually appears sophomoric in fiction. (It is, of course, possible to forget ...


1

What, in the end, are you asking? You have planned out parts of the story: your protagonist blocking an incident and that incident 'defines her character and life choices'. It seems like you have decided what is going to happen whatever. Yet you want information that is believable without you having to take the trouble to 'dive too deeply into psychological ...


1

I had a friend whose mother remembered being fed human flesh as a child. This was late in WW2 in Holland, at time when everyone was starving and many died. She was a cheerful older lady. If she was traumatized by it, it didn't show. In real life, people react in many different ways. Some find it easier to take things in their stride. Others might be ...


0

In this specific case, I'd be very surprised if your child's teacher expected you to define it narrowly. Any fantasy story would probably be acceptable. In general, however, a fairy tale is a short story with archetypal characters and plotlines. According to wikipedia the characters and settings are usually drawn from European folklore, however, there are ...


2

There are several distinctive elements that differentiate fairy tales from modern fantasy, if we understand "modern fantasy" to mean "the modern literary genre established by authors such as J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis, and the various sub-genres that have emerged from it since." Scope: A fairy tale takes place close to home for the character. Jack ...


0

You're never too young to write.


1

These are probably evolving terms rather than hard and fast divisions, but what I would say distinguishes fairy tales from fantasy is that a fairy tale is a tale about a human being encountering fairy folk, who represent a danger to ordinary human life. Fairies have been Disnified in recent years, but Yeats poem "The Stolen Child" ...


1

A fairytale is a more palatable way of demonstrating a moral or ethical lesson to your audience. No-one wants to be preached to but if the lesson is couched in an entertaining form - in this case a story - then they will listen and, despite themselves, learn. The reason for the fantasy elements is part of this. By using otherworldly characters, creatures ...


5

I believe that the traditional sense of the term fairy tale is used for a fairly concise story that is written to appeal mainly to children. The general context of a fairy tale would be the standard "Once upon a time.... and they lived happily ever after, THE END" Generally these stories involved magic, fantasy characters and creatures, and were meant to ...


0

Multiple pov is promising until it is not confusing for readers. You can simply include the killer's narrative whenever you want to spice things up. I would love to read such work until it is not frustrating. You can simply cross check your lines by thinking as a reader than a writer. As a character's voice is oblivious, you can twist the plot by shifting ...


1

This is treading on thin ice in this case. Although ideas cannot generally be copyrighted, US law does offer extra protection for a series, and the story you're a fan of is a series of stories under the conceptual umbrella of the Machine of Death. So yes, it might well be a problem if you come up your own story using the "Machine of Death" label. You ...


2

U.S. copyright law explicitly says that you do not have a copyright in an idea. There's a big international treaty about copyright so most other countries would be the same. You only own a copyright to the exact words, pictures, or other "tangible expression" of an idea. If you're not copying someone else's exact words (or pictures or music or whatever), ...


0

The POV for each scene should be made clear very quickly. But that's not hard if you mention their name in the narration when doing something. As mentioned above, you can just use "the killer" or something like that for the killer. Use "they" instead of "he/she", or even switch to first person. The other thing is that most people wouldn't title themselves ...


3

You don't need character names in chapter headings, unless you are attempting multiple first person narratives. Therefore your only problem is how to name the villain. Dan Brown does this n every novel. Just pick something descriptive, e.g. The Controller, The Military Man, The Survivor. Names like these allude to a role or a personal history which can be a ...


5

Concepts are not copyrightable. However, unusual similarities in story, characters, plotline, accidental or otherwise, can form the basis for a copyright infringement claim. This usually only comes up when the claimant can demonstrate economic harm or is protecting valuable IP.


2

If you keep the reader engaged, and provide them enough interesting aspects of the story and a strong hook, then the II occurring at 10K probably won't be a problem. One thing I would recommend, though, is allowing yourself the luxury of writing the story to the story's requirement, rather than a word count. If the movement of the story goes longer than ...


1

I don't think it's necessarily what's common. It's more about what you want to do. As long as your bridging conflicts are engaging and your characters are given goals and pre-arcs, and are characterized in an engaging way during the setup, you should have no problem with this. I know that in Jaws (even though it isn't a fantasy), the author gives us the ...


1

Legally, in the US or the UK or countries with a similar legal tradition, the older the quote, the more famous the person quoted, and the more famous the quote itself, the safer you are. Quotations from works that are centuries old, as well as very famous quotes from the modern era, are held to have passed into the public domain. If you have specific reason ...


1

As @rolfedh mentions: You are comparing a work from a publishing house with works from Kindle Direct Publishing. Different content sources = different legal contract. Amazon seems deliberately vague to help bolster its position on accepting or rejecting KDP works: Pornography : "We don't accept pornography or offensive depictions of graphic ...


1

You might have to consult a lawyer, but from my time as a newspaper editor, I recall that (in the 1990s) BOOK TITLES WERE NOT SUBJECT TO COPYRIGHT. So long as you are not "attempting to trade upon the prestige of the earlier work by that title," (or words to that effect) you are okay. That means, in "real language," that so long as your ms. does not ...


4

In this case, there's not likely to be a problem if you give your novel the same title as a Czech essay. You're not trying to confuse anyone, and intelligent people are unlikely to be confused by it. The protection given to a title is complicated. People sometimes say "You can't protect a title," but this is not true. Some titles can be registered as ...


0

If you're using a title already used before, you should check out how popular that book was. If it was, then you should probably change it. Chances are that it might still be fresh in peoples' memories. Each book title should be as unique as possible. However, if the previous book was not so well known and is deeply buried in the mists of time, then you can ...


3

I worked in bookstores for 10 years and libraries for five. You have no idea how often someone asks for a title that seems unique, but two or even three hits come up. It's even worse when it's a single word title. I'd check and see what the other book is about. If the subject matter is too similar and its recently published, it might cause confusion. But ...


3

Titles cannot be copyrighted or trademarked. Yes, “Star Wars” is trademarked, but not because of the book or movie. It is the toys and other goods that enable the trademark. So you should go ahead and use your title.


14

If you think the title is the best fit for your novel, you should keep it. There are many novels with the same name in the market, which makes it a little hard to find a novel with smaller market presence written by unknown author. Thus why, it is only a problem if the novel you're writing has the same name with another novel written by an author with more ...


0

It's a good idea to invent a school name if your story presents the school in a bad light. For example, if you are writing a fictional story about someone being sexually abused in class, and the school officials do nothing about it, you are moving in dangerous territory. Regardless of any disclaimer at the start of your book, people may think the events are ...


1

Fanfic can help you learn writing skills if you treat it as a professional project. If you strive to make it the best it can be, then you will have learned something while doing it. Good luck!


0

It's your book, but I'd suggest using real places for the majority. What if one of your readers were from that city, and become annoyed at inaccuracies? However, you can still get away with making a school up, as long as it's not supposed to be a well-known school. I did this in my own novel. Plop it down on a nonexistent street and done give any ...


0

Fictionalizing a philosophical/cultural concept isn't illegal, uncommon, or, in my opinion, unethical. Fictionalizing can actually help popularize a concept that might otherwise languish in obscurity. If you are fortunate to get published, you might ask to have an author's note included at the end of the book referencing the original article --I've seen ...


2

Plagiarism is an academic violation that applies to scholarly papers. It doesn't apply to works of fiction. The whole point of a scholarly paper is that you're presenting something that you claim is a new and original idea or discovery. If you copied it from someone else, then your paper is a fraud. Of course you may use ideas from others and build on ...


4

You're using inspiration from a real-life character in a fictitious world, which has been done by every writer ever. Utilizing a mindset you notice in real life in your work isn't plagiarism any more than setting your story in a location that actually exists. Of course, that doesn't mean you should copy the guy's words verbatim from the previous article, ...


0

Yes. You can make up places. Just make sure to indicate in the foreword that everything in your writing is purely a work of fiction, especially when you use the names of famous places. Otherwise, you might confuse readers - especially the young ones - if such a place exists.


1

TeiganJo, It is your book and it is your creation. You can add,create,imagine anything you want to. For your realistic imagination power you can write about real places or persons but also personify them to some other names. In a book/novel, names can be fine but what is more important is the characters and roles every entity has and relate to.


3

Put simply: You can make up whatever details you want. You can use what is there when you want to and then make things up. If nothing else, the names of schools change.


0

For middle-grade picture books, I recommend Inkygirl: http://inkygirl.com/ There is also the Kidlidchat chat-event on Twitter, where you can connect to other kidlit-writers and find their blogs: https://twitter.com/kidlitchat


1

Quick answer: Nancy Yi Fan started writing her first book at age seven. At 10, she got it published. It was called, "Sword Bird". I never read it myself, but it got good reviews and was fairly popular. Now she has two more Sword Books published. Three books published before you're twenty is a pretty sweet accomplishment. Yes it's quite possible.


0

One thing i haven't seen on this site, and a main reason that most of the examples posted used this technique, is to add character without having to explain it. For example, if you had "the mechanic' as a character, your mind automatically sees him or her as down-to-earth, black stained hands, straightforward thinker or something of the like. Or "the ...


1

Easiest answer I can give you is that the journey to the lack of resolved conflict has to be satisfying. There needs to be some emotional payoff to the reader. Otherwise, we get pissed that we've wasted our money and time on YOUR book. In fact, I've read stories which went ker-blooey at the end in terms of any form of satisfaction, and I usually never read ...


1

From the tone of your post, I assume that the point is that the character's death is unrelated to the conspiracy. Having him murdered by the conspirators, thus proving the truth of his suspicions, is well within the usual conventions of fiction. Assuming the poor guy just gets run over or something, John Yorke's Into the Woods: How Stories Work and Why We ...



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