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4

There's an easy answer: It depends on the genre. Generally speaking, genre readers (that is, detective fiction, science fiction, fantasy, romance) will expect a certain degree of predictability - you are in control of the degree, knowing that some pleasant twists and surprises are welcome, but something too experimental will probably be received less warmly. ...


3

This related answer may help you, but I'll expand more here: I think it was J. Michael Straczynski, writer of Bablyon 5, who wrote that one could sum up "conflict" in three questions: What does the character want? What will the character do to get it? What will someone do to stop the character? As noted in some of the other excellent answers here, the ...


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Most trilogies or series follow chronological order, but there's no requirement. Do whatever serves your story. As long as it's clear to your reader what's happening when in relation to other events, you can present events in whatever order works for you.


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The previous answers are pretty good, contributing my penny. If you are writing a trilogy, you are talking about a specific set of characters which are time bounded (can exist for a specific period of time it's upto you to make them live in all 3 books and/or show their ancestors-descendants) in other 2 books. If you are depicting same people throughout ...


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One of my writing professors is a fellow believer of the notion that everything is cliche. Almost everything has been done before, and redone many times over. The question is, can you write it in a way that your characters are still unique and interesting? Lots of things can be similar, but still different, and entertaining. In comics many characters are ...


2

Surprise is the cheapest of literary devices. People often reread their favorite books and re-watch their favorite movies. They would not do so if their enjoyment of them depended on surprise. With effective storytelling our hearts can still be in our mouths for a character at a critical juncture no matter how often we have read the story. If we can enjoy a ...


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If you are contemplating about mediaeval warfare with longsword type weapons, try reenactors. These people are actually researching what can, cannot be done with the means at the time. This includes fighting in full plate using realistic swords. There are lots of visuals to be found but best would be to seek out a group from a compatible age and go ...


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If I were writing this story, I would have the character start Taking the Third Option (needless link to TV Tropes omitted). He is trapped in the room, and can either wait for help or go through the potentially dangerous robotics lab (with all sorts of power tools and mechanical arms to wield them as weapons), but he instead goes in the robotics lab just ...


1

As others have said, the main conflict is what the main character wants and can't get. But I think the point that needs making here is about what plot is. I think it is all to easy to get into the habit of thinking of plot as a kind of history. You can meticulously develop an imaginary history and write it down, including lots of conflicts, without ...


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It depends entirely on your story and what you are trying to achieve. Certainly, most trilogies and pulp series are chronological, but there are a number that flow between eras. The one thing they all need, though, is something to connect the separate eras/characters/stories together. One example is Traci Harding's Ancient Future trilogy, which tells a ...


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My two cents! Which cost me significantly more after this morning's referendum result, mind you... What's conflict? Conflict exists when one desire is opposed to another. The opposing desires can belong to two different characters: Batman wants to punch Joker in the face But Joker wants to not be punched in the face Or the opposing desires ...


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There is nothing wrong here it just feels you don't like your conflict to be nerve gripping and mind boggling. I understand your concern and find it very genuine cause as long as you don't satisfy your own nerve you won't be happy about what outcome will be. I know you never asked about probable conflicts but I wrote them cause I feel you are not happy ...


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Excellent question, to which you have partially provided your own answer, though you don't seem to realize it. You said: The goal is to catch whoever did the crime, or maybe prove he's guilty. There's nothing really standing in the way of that, unless you count the detectives' simple ignorance of all the facts. And that hardly seems like it could ...


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You can indicate attraction with nothing more than intense interest. If your characters are secretly attracted to one another, they will watch each other very closely. They will remember each other's likes and dislikes, even when mentioned in passing, and they may use this information to needle each other. Your POV character will think about Thomas a lot. ...


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I think you really need to focus on those things that the friend can observe and then conclusions from those observations. This will likely make your descriptions concern the physical manifestations. Not "lust for blood" but maybe "behaving like a berserker" or "in a frenzy." What other odd things might the friend notice? And please don't rely on the "not ...


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I often create characters, and factions for my stories before developing a more polished plot. Generally after creating a character I have a rough idea of where my plot is going, and what I want to do with these characters. From there world building takes over, and I make notes in Scrivener for future reference as I write the story.



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