Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Every line you write should have some goal or purpose in your story: drawing the reader into plot, character, or setting. (In fact, having each line, or as many lines as you can, do two or more of these can work very well). For example, the Fly episode presumably increases your empathy with characters, sets up important moments later on, etc. If your break ...


7

All depends on what kind of book you write. The great novels of the past often meander like a continent-crossing river. The bestselling novels of today, on the other hand, quickly build tension and keep it taut and rising until the final explosive resolution. The price for this break neck speed is depth and meaning: many novels of today are meaningless ...


6

You need to ask yourself why you add these references in the first place. Are they relevant to the development of your characters or the plot of your story? When not, you should sacrifice them to the law of conservation of detail. There is little point in wasting your readers time with indulging in your personal pet-issue when it doesn't lead anywhere. On ...


5

Oh my, yes. Just a personal opinion, but these lose me faster than anything else. I have a love/hate with Stephen King for the same reason. He gets so much into "atmosphere" (read - useless backstory) that I can hardly finish a large part of his books (and literally skip paragraphs and paragraphs when reading to get to the salient points).


5

Yes. Unless your following metaphor is easily related to one or the other. "She has green eyes and red hair. It looked like a wild forrest fire...." Then people can easily relate it to the hair, and not the eyes.


4

For color-to-name converter, a quick Google search gives me this link: http://chir.ag/projects/name-that-color/#C0C0C0 In which you can just pick a color from the color wheel to see its name. Perhaps the color you want is "Mercury"


4

The second option is OK, if you can smooth out the phrasing. What would be more ideal is if you could rephrase to avoid the problem, to avoid lumping the two items together in the first place - for example: She had green eyes, and curly hair that looked like a cluster of ferns in a mountain forest. Another option is completing the list, and then ...


4

(a) Try to differentiate yourself from your narrator and protagonist. That person is not you. Define that person in relation to the plot: what is his goal, how does he see the world, how does he behave, and how does the world react to him. If you have difficulty with this, write relevant passages in third person and then "translate" them to first. (b) A ...


3

All depends on pacing. Imagine the main plot needs a lot of slow build-up. You'd bore the reader. So introduce a sub-plot, an alternate layer that tells some backstories - captivating, thrilling backstories. Pepper your main story with episodes of the new thread to carry the reader through slow times. Alternatively, you can give the reader a breather in ...


2

I didn't see a problem with it, at least in that short excerpt. Fictional characters can have their own prejudices and opinions, and if that's a source of conflict in the story it's showing not telling. In a story, I'd like to see that difference between the characters have some active consequences rather than being represented by stuck-in speeches or ...


2

Writers should make their Characters relate to their audience. You are an Atheist writing about the lives of Christian characters, While sneaking in sacrilegious text. So its a recipe for disaster. When a Christian reader reads about the life of another christian they say 'This character is christian and I am christian therefore i like this character(and by ...


2

That's some overt preaching there! I'd say that, as done, it is detrimental. For one thing, you'll automatically turn off many Western readers, who might decide never to read anything of yours ever again. Human nature. More importantly, though, the character's (your) line of reasoning is weak. The argument assumes things that not all Christians agree ...


2

There are a number of instances of this being done well in both book and film. However there are also a number of instances of it being done badly - so you are right to be cautious. Some examples where it does work: Film: American Beauty Book & Film: The Lovely Bones Books: A lot of David Gemmell's books A running theme through his books is ...


2

Not an answer, just some additions to the existing answers. @karlphillip: "Make sure you have introduced another character to take his place [...]." Obviously you can easily kill one character in an ensemble cast. If you have a team of heroes, all except one can die. One from the team must fulfill the task, the rest are expendable. Because you don't have a ...


2

If you make comments that are critical of someone's religion or politics or social beliefs or whatever, some number of people will find it annoying or offensive and be uninterested in reading your stories. Take the flip side. You say you're an atheist. Suppose you read a book that had many sections that attacked atheism in one way or another. I'd guess ...


2

Consider adding them as appendices. This gives readers the choice when, if at all, to break from the main plot, or delve deeper into the character backgrounds after finishing the main plot.


2

I think you'd do better moving the mention of hair to the second sentence: She had green eyes. Her hair curled like ferns clustered in a mountain forest. Or one sentence: She had green eyes and her hair curled like ferns clustered in a mountain forest. Having said that, I'm not really able to picture ferns as hair, but that might just be me.


2

Ok, I'm just going to be bold here and put my two cents in: The main plot of your story is what keeps the reader coming back for more. If that suddenly grinds to a halt, you run the risk of losing the reader. Just how entertaining and important are these chapters? Could someone skip them and still enjoy the story? Is the reader likely to become ...


1

Here are two sites that you might want to check out: http://kodisha.net/color-names/?color=FF91A4 http://www.colorhexa.com/ff91a4


1

You could even use it to keep people in suspense, I suppose. Maybe tell a story about it, whatever it is.. You just hint at it from various angles, before finally revealing what this 'it' is that you were keeping people in suspense over...


1

I'm a hobby writer and a learning coder, and I stumbled on this place. Very cool to find writers here, and what an excellent question. The answers above are excellent too. As for subplots, the above fly episode, which I have not seen sounds interesting. Sometimes a writer needs to add exposition, and it would seem this person has done it in an interesting ...


1

The reader needs to like the protagonist and want him to win, otherwise he will stop reading. Therefore, I am unsure about killing off the protagonist. This is not because I like the character too much, but because the reader might stop reading. No. Your level of storytelling ability determines whether the readers stop reading. I often read short ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible