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4

It would be hard to answer this question without being an agent or an editor. I'm sure each individual agent, editor, and publisher has his or her own criteria in evaluating a manuscript and considering either taking on the writer as a client or publishing the manuscript. Regardless of the individual's personal criteria or preferences, the one common thread ...


4

You (usually) should put the thing first that you want to emphasize. But speech can be different, since it is also characterization. A hesitant or unsure character might habitually tack qualifiers to the ends of his statements. "A dog is a mammal, I think." "People should be nice to children, I suppose." "If you take one step closer I'll ...


3

Think about what fillers are used for. They can be habitual. For example, some people start every utterance with 'well'. Mostly, they are used to give the person a little bit more time to think. Work out when your character most needs that time (at the beginning because they don't know what to say or half way through because they don't know what to say next) ...


3

I'm not able to find a sample of the book, but, from what you've posted above, it looks like the author decided to capitalize the first three words of each section, as noted in the comments above. That first one is different because "Fear of Music" needs to be set apart from the artist. I've seen many big authors use this capitalization technique; it's just ...


3

Looking at a sample of the book it seems obvious to me that the use of capital letters is rather arbitrary. It doesn't enhance the text, in my opinion. Actually, it looks like rather lazy editing to me.


2

I don't generally see anything wrong with using "and/or" in fiction, but you need to make sure that it is used in an appropriate way. You need to look at your writing as two separate sentences and make sure that they each come across the way you intended. He planned to let Fields take the lead and try not to slow him down and get killed. He ...


1

In both of the examples you gave, I would assume that there is some level of public knowledge or information that has already been shared publicly. As a result, there would be no reason for you to not be able to write about it. One way to help you answer your own question is to ask yourself how you came to know about it. If you read about it online or ...


1

If the item is a legitimate experiment from the military and it's not public knowledge (e.g. you have security clearances with access to that info), I would most definitely ask a lawyer, but my gut says no. If it is public knowledge, then pretty much anything is fair game, especially if you're writing fiction. Though to ease your mind, you may still want to ...



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