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25

There are no age restrictions on publishing - you may need to get someone else to sign contracts for you, but that's a minor detail. That said, it's pretty hard to get a book published, even for adults who've been working at writing for a long time. It's probably best if you focus on writing because it's fun, and give yourself a chance to explore without ...


8

Don't discount yourself because you're young. That's great that you're starting off so early. Keep at it! Though I don't believe anyone will have a problem with it, there are different scenarios depending on how you want to be published (self-pub vs traditional pub). For traditional, no one is going to ask your age when you're submitting queries, so if ...


5

I think what makes anything matter to readers is: it matters to a character that readers care about it matters to the character for reasons readers can identify with


5

In many (maybe most) cases over-research is a distraction our minds create to make us believe we are working on a project that we really don't want to write for some reason. It could be that we are afraid to write it because we have this beautiful idea of what we want and we are unsure if we could ever write it that well. The Best Advice The best thing ...


5

Everything that happens in a story should happen for a reason. And the main reason is to impress the reader. That said, yes, you can kill your character, but only if you make it meaningful. Character deaths in stories have two reasons: to drive the plot forward and to evoke emotions in your readers. See George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire ...


5

If you don't want to use an apostrophe, then consider a diaeresis. It used to be common in English to mark vowels that come after vowels, but need to be pronounced separately, with a diaeresis for example: noöne coördinate Zoë Also, this format is used in Lord of The Rings, e.g. in Fëanor, to make sure the e is pronounced separately. (You can read this ...


5

A few ideas: You could have a character who doesn't speak that language ask how the name is pronounced, or mispronounce it and receive a correction. Obviously it would look contrived for this to keep happening, but doing it once or twice would be enough to introduce the general rule. Use Matt Ellen's idea of a diaeresis / umlaut for the first two names ...


4

There's no hard-and-fast rule for how often to attribute dialogue, but the general goal is clarity. If readers are finding a section unclear, it should be reworked. In this example, I'd just add a few more tags. "Roses and a dead body?" Anna wrinkled her fine nose. "I don't see the connection." "And they came from Paris," I said. "How did it end ...


3

Just skip to the next plot point and write that. Chances are that later on you'll think of a way to bridge the two, and then you can come back and fill in the details when that happens. I would guess that very few writers proceed sequentially through an entire work. It's good to jump around when you're finding yourself stuck; there's no point in stagnating ...


3

If you write a history, it will likely be of interest only to yourself (or as preparation for your book). That's not necessarily a reason not to write it. JRR Tolkien put years of effort into world-building for his books, which is likely a key reason for their continued popularity. If you do go ahead and write your narrative now, don't make the mistake of ...


3

OVER-using adverbs is a sign of bad writing, just like OVER-using anything else. In your first example, I think it's fine. There are different kinds of smiles, it's hard to describe the differences between them using "showing" words, and it's important that people know what kind of smile this is. So I don't have a problem with "kindly". Technically, I guess ...


3

Do people using the constructed language use a Latin-based alphabet similar to English, or do they have an entirely different writing system? Spelling it "oddly" would make sense if the people literally use the symbols A-s-h-e or S-y-a-n to write their name. For example, they could be descendants of Portuguese-speaking people from Brazil whose language has ...


3

It's hard to give a completely accurate answer without the complete context of the character (her dialogue, her descriptions, how she views the world, and how specifically this situation unfolds) but the assumption of pettiness might not be wholly a symptom of likability, and more to do with how round, or fleshed out your character is. Ask yourself is this ...


2

Given the nature of the transformation, this is clearly magical. As Kate said, you get to decide how the magic affects tattoos. What would be the most interesting for your story? If the story takes place in the otherwise real world, tattoos on a child would certainly draw attention, and perhaps lead to all sorts of delicious conflict (what sort of lowlife ...


2

The best way to revise a manuscript depends on at least three things: firstly, what state the text is in e.g. first draft, rough notes, near publication. Secondly, what type of writer you are e.g. first on paper and then type, only type, organise completely in head before commiting a word to paper. Thirdly, how long do you have e.g. it is due tomorrow, it is ...


2

Related question at: 2nd Draft- Fix spelling/grammar or plot first? I would say you should definitely start with the macro-issues, the plot/characterization/structure issues that may lead to you re-writing entire chunks of the story. There's no point polishing writing that you're going to end up deleting. After that? I've never gone through an entire ...


2

All people have a natural curiosity. The mystery genre usually preys on that curiosity, giving people a hypothesis and asking them one or several questions based on that hypothesis. This is the 'mystery'. Then they try to solve the said mystery in their minds and this involves them in the story a great deal. Because it makes the story personal for them. ...


2

What are your goals? Are you writing for entertainment, for yourself? If so, write what you want. Write the history, write a series of vignettes from the perspective of a prehistoric ghost of your world, write a new alphabet and language for each creature - write whatever makes you happy. If your goal is publication, ask yourself what kind of publication ...


2

A common trap for novice writers is to try to build emotion by using lots of superlatives and exclamation marks. This is a case where the classic advice, "show, don't tell", should be considered. Don't just tell the reader that something is the biggest or the best or the ugliest. Describe it or show it in action so that the reader sees why or how it is the ...


2

It depends of the emotions you are trying to evoke when the character explains his past. Do you want the others to pity him, to admire him? Is he proud or ashamed of himself? The style and techniques used can vary depending on that. Phraseology and sentence length come into this. For example: If I say something. Something short. But meaningful. It may have ...


2

Do you have some other parts of the story worked out? I would just jump ahead for now and write the next scene that you "know". Then, before you know it, you can fill the gap.


2

You could have an appendix (such as appears in the best-selling Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan) that explains pronunciations. However even that is subject to pismronunciation. Of course there already is a way to write these things. It is called IPA, the International Phonetic Alphabet. The problem is that most of us don't learn it at school. However, ...


2

Close male-female relationships that aren't romantic are challenging even in real life, let alone fiction, but they do exist. Assuming the pair isn't related, neither of them is gay, and they're relatively the same age, your readers will begin to long to see them together, just like their friends in real life would be likely to do. One way of dealing with ...


2

I have and have always had many close female friends. I don't see what's so special or "difficult" about these relationships, they function just like any friendship I have with a man or boy. If you want to write about a male-female friendship, then just write a male-female friendship. No, I don't constantly wonder wether or not I would like to have sex ...


1

That absolutely depends on your story. If it's important for the story, readers will be curious. But then, don't disappoint them ;-)


1

One thing that usually annoys me greatly in film is when there is a group dialogue and everybody is practically finishing each other's sentences without any pause. It's like one brain and 3 mouths rattling. The dialogue becomes unreal. How about having two people talk interactively, until there is a transition to a third person (the camera pans). Anna ...


1

In a script this is easy as all dialogue is simply tagged. But that comes across rather artificial in a novel. For this example I'd make it a bit more narrator-centric. Looking back and forth between Anna and Carl, observing and interpreting both gestures, facial expressions and spoken words. Reacting both to the conversation at hand and from the history, ...


1

Sir, I don't wish to be harsh but you deserve honesty. Concerning yourself with world-building issues should not be your focus now. If English is your language of choice, your skills with the written word are not at the level they need to be. Your writing contains many grammatical errors that book-readers will not tolerate. You must first improve your ...


1

I am a young writer too! :) I've been creating a series with my best friend we are both young and I we found an author that have invested in us and has taken the time to really get to know us <3 What I've learned so far is to not fall down when people think your too young ;) one of my favorite Bible verses is: "Don't let anyone look down on you because ...


1

If the novel is good enough to get published, it won't matter how old you are. You'll just be that much cooler. I've been trying to get published since 12, like you—well actually 11—and I'm 17 now, still sans dice, as they say. I hope you have more luck. Don't ever give up. And maybe brush up on your homonyms ("too" vs "to"—though that's minutiae).



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