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9

I would suggest a different approach than the other answers. If you are completely new to writing, just write. Think about other areas of learning. If you just had your first physics class, the next step won't be building a car. The first thing will probably be something like a battery, two wires, and a lightbulb. Writing is the same. Like anything it ...


7

Most people work with the thought in mind that their piece of writing will go on to be well received, and more success will come based around that, so will leave doors open for sequels. However, nobody wants to read an incomplete book. Therefore you will usually find that most things will wrap up quite well at the end, and most plot points will be handled ...


7

It is called an epigraph or motto.


6

Yes, there are stronger words and while when writing (especially fiction) it is perfectly acceptable to use less strong words but it's better to avoid them if you can. As you say, you're trying to invoke your readers senses. Example: I landed on the floor with a bump I thumped onto the floor Using stronger words can also allow you say the same but ...


6

I think there's a difference between character development and character depth. Development means change. You can have an interesting villain who is only ever a villain, but still has backstory, motivation, relationships, and hobbies. That's a deep character who doesn't change. But if your character acts like a boring, shallow buffoon for two acts and then ...


5

Imagine you are travelling to a foreign country with different laws, customs, traditions and so on. You (the reader) travel in the company of someone who is familiar with that country (the narrator). That companion will warn you of the most deadly pitfalls (such as the death sentence for drug trafficking or that you get your hand hacked off for shop ...


4

Symmetry is not important, but rhythm is. Considering rhythm I would change your example to: My understanding of zoology was poor, but I knew animals would do anything to survive: birds would use their wings to fly from snakes, buffaloes their legs to run from lions. I alwasy read my texts aloud. They must have rhythm like a poem. Try it with your ...


4

I'm not sure what multiple points of view would have to do with how you introduce the laws of magic in your world. In general, I think a narrative flows better if you can introduce the rules spread out through early sections of the book. Otherwise, you have a long dry intro. If you can summarize your rules fairly quickly, like a page or so, you could simply ...


4

I realize that I am probably getting way ahead of myself in planning book 3 when I haven't even finished book 1 Not necessarily. I would actually recommend that you know exactly how things will turn out before you begin. As to your question: Should I use up good ideas within a book that I'm already planning on writing that wouldn't be utilized to ...


4

I think it's subjective. To my ear, to avoid is a series of individual events, while avoiding implies something continuous and ongoing. "She started to avoid me" sounds like "I called her and she didn't return my call. The next day I texted her but she didn't text back. Two days later I sent her an email which she never opened." "She started avoiding me" ...


4

There are stronger and weaker words, but using weaker words isn't always bad. Using strong words all the time would be as bad as using weaker words all the time, as it wouldn't distinguish when something is less severe. In addition, contrasting strong/weak words shows what the reader should focus on more. Consider the two sentences: John stared at the ...


4

Without knowing your plot its hard to say, but I think you might have already mentioned the word at the heart of a possible solution. Circle. Don't just have his past haunt him, and explain his actions. Make him confront it again in the main plot. Bring him full circle. What you currently think is your main plot, is just the excuse to see him in action. ...


4

LotR does in fact have such a book (I believe it is the Silmarillion). However, that book could only be published because the Hobbit/LotR books came first. In short, there would be no interest in it without LotR in the first place. This is why an encyclopedia or history book of a fictional land will not work on its own. It may get published, but the interest ...


4

I would suspect that you may be having a specific problem with storytelling (which is not quite the same thing as writing.) I myself do a lot of worldbuilding for fictional purposes, and your description: "I will spend large amounts of planning the geography so small pockets of interesting species can live secluded, how the trade between countries work, ...


3

Words have connotations. Using these overtones and implied meanings to create the effect you want makes them strong words. For example, compare these two versions of essentially the same thing: The man killed the boy. The monster slaughtered the innocent child. The second version is more emotive, and some words do stir the emotions more, but there may be ...


3

Clichéd descriptions and hackneyed actions exist in writing because they are such common occurrences in real life. For example, when people are waiting anxiously for something, they often really do pace up and down the room. I've done it; you've done it. And people often use clichés in real life, e.g., "it's raining cats and dogs out there" or "she was ...


3

I totally agree with the answer given by Tommy Myron, but I think there is one thing to add about the way you look at this question. I think whether you decide to use your ideas now depends on whether the ideas concerned are or are not naturally part of your current plot. If they are, i.e. if they fit harmoniously into the series of events that you consider ...


3

I would actually keep her character intact as a cheerleader. Then in the second, as you reveal more about her character and motivations for overthrowing the current CEO, you can show that her appearance in the original work was a carefully crafted facade, designed to get her to the top as quickly and effortlessly as possible. The exact reasoning, of ...


3

If I’m understanding you correctly, you have a female character – who is not an MC right now, but a strong secondary character. This character in current WIP is of the Ambassador personality type. Typically this type is described as: Ambassadors will be positive about any change and will be highly aligned, however they will not proactively try to ...


3

I have been told that the sentence you should cut out is the one you love the most. I have found this true of my own writing: a really interesting section just has to go because it doesn't fit within the whole. Sometimes I have be able to re-cast an idea. Sometimes I have been able to use it in another story or play. Sometimes I have to just throw it away.


3

I think you might be happy in game development or some other industry where different artists focus on different aspects of the whole. If I where you I would try to search for something like "worldbuilding jobs" and whatever other search phrase you can come up with. Here is a blog that covers game writing: http://blog.ubi.com/tag/the-write-stuff/ There is ...


2

These are both prepositional phrases. Number 1 should be included. Number 2 does not have to be. Below I explain why. A prepositional phrase must consist of a preposition (behind, on, in, under, around, etc.) and an object (i.e. what the object of the sentence is behind, on, in, etc.) Sentence number 1 omits the prepositional object 'us.' You need that ...


2

These are purely my opinion, but I would say (1) no, I wouldn't omit; and (2) yes, that's fine. (1) "...we sat on the rest chairs behind." Behind what? Behind your necks? That's what "behind" is referring to right now, and it doesn't make sense. (2) "I wasn't an expert." This sounds natural to me. "Expert" right now is referring to ...


2

I will tell you the single most helpful thing that helped me in constructing characters for a story. That is the Alignment System. It is often used in role-playing games to construct broad characters, but I've found it is a great jumping off point for creating a more detailed, well balanced character. Constructing a 2d grid and plotting good-evil and ...


2

This may seem a bit unorthodox, but if you'd like to see a very good example of an antagonist with believable motivations, the character Jack/Handsome Jack from the Borderlands video game series is an excellent place to start. This example may be a bit more outlandish/extreme than what you're going for (at least from what I can extrapolate from your House ...


2

Michael Swan's Practical English Usage (2nd ed., p. 285): 296 -ing forms used like nouns (5):        -ing form or infinitive? ... 10 begin and start Begin and start can be followed by infinitives or -ing forms. Usually there is no important difference.      She began playing / to play the guitar ...


2

I would agree with Lauren that both constructs are equally valid from a grammatical point of view, but there are a number of other factors to bias the decision. Character voice. People who studied latin prefer infinitives, people who work with their hands prefer gerunds. Tense. infinitives work very well with future tense, gerunds work well with present ...


2

Of course. As Tave says, some words have stronger emotional connotations, or convey the idea of more extreme action. George was exhausted after toiling for untold hours. George was tired after working for a long time. John was overcome with passion for Sarah, whose beauty filled his dreams. John liked Sarah and thought she was pretty. ...


2

In general, the "stronger" words in your examples are more specific. Twisting is a kind of turning. Treading is a kind of walking. What makes them "stronger" is that they give you more control of what the reader experiences. If you say, "turn," the reader can conjure many, many images of someone turning. If you say "twist," that eliminates all kinds of ...


2

That sounds more like a twist ending, the big reveal with "haha! I was acting this entire time!" Having the protagonist act one way the entire time and then pulling the rug out from the audience will leave them feeling a little bit confused and annoyed. If they've rooted for a genuine person all along and then they turn out to be a bitch, they won't feel ...



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