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29

Use your best ideas. Write them as well as you can. Yes, your writing will improve with experience. And your ideas will also improve with experience. If you reserve your "best ideas" until you're a better writer, then your early stories will exhibit neither your best ideas nor your best writing. Why hamper yourself like that? Sometimes people love great ...


8

Use your good ideas. Just don't give away the rights to your creation. Make sure that you can re-use your story and elements. I've seen countless stories about people who made a wonderful classic early in their career. (I'm talking about creators, and not necessarily writers specifically. Could be writers, game makers, etc.) Then later in life, they ...


6

Ask yourself: how motivated will you feel writing about a mediocre story? To improve, you need to write—a lot. You won’t enjoy writing if you’re not passionate about your story. Pick your best idea, the one that sets your creativity ablaze, and write it. Make sure you finish it. If the writing is not good enough for publication, then move on to the next ...


5

Well, "good" is subjective. You can have a loathsome, hissable, completely irredeemable villain who roasts puppies, shoots women with crossbows, and writes comics where Captain America is revealed to be a lifelong HYDRA agent at the end, and your reader will likely despise that character. However, even your wretched villain should be three-dimensional. ...


5

In any creative discipline you should absolutely work to the best of your ability at every stage of your career as your previous works are both your way to show the world what you are capable of and a platform for you to build on. Similarly 'ideas' are often a bit overrated, creativity is not so much about having brilliant flashes of inspiration so much ...


3

FWIW, here's my personal story that can perhaps serve as a teaching point in relation to the question: I wrote my first fiction when I was 6 yrs old - a 2-paragraph Donald Duck mystery I began writing short stories when I was 13-14 I won a small local award for a short story I wrote when I was 18 I began writing novels at that time, fully expecting to be ...


3

I see your problem, humans can show striking ingenuity in constructing narratives to support the notion that everything is a divine sign. I can only come up with two solutions: The chaotic one. Rather than trying to destroy her narrative, have her realize that different narratives can be constructed around the same events and take agency as the writer of ...


3

This related answer may help you, but I'll expand more here: I think it was J. Michael Straczynski, writer of Bablyon 5, who wrote that one could sum up "conflict" in three questions: What does the character want? What will the character do to get it? What will someone do to stop the character? As noted in some of the other excellent answers here, the ...


2

If this doesn't help, sorry. I tried. Just don't dumb it down too much. The guy doesn't know what a vampire is, but he isn't a complete imbecile. The readers already know what a vampire is, no need to explain it to them. Also: how does his friend know he has a lust for blood, maybe he's just really violent? Don't imply it right at the start. Usually ...


2

When writing in first person, you would only write about what your POV character is seeing, thinking, feeling, experiencing. This means that unless she is looking in a mirror, or particularly self-conscious, she would not be thinking about her own appearance in great detail. This means that it would make sense that she would notice her friend's appearance ...


2

If the reader is firmly in the character's POV, and expects to remain firmly in the character's POV, this is jarring and can throw the reader right out of the story. If the reader is firmly in an omniscient, opinionated narrator's POV, and is prepared to dip in and out of characters' heads, this works just fine. For this to work, you have to prep the ...


2

I don't think so. The hunger games surely weren't the first novel with this theme (there was battle royale, for example) but it works and people love it. Don't be afraid of overused ideas, because common themes are everywhere anyway, instead, try to make your book stand out because of the details, of the characters, the conflicts, etc. For example (and ...


2

First thing of emergency treatment is vital signs and airway--blood pressure, heart rate, respirations, and pulse oxygenation of the blood. Burning gasoline will produce volatile vapors which will also cause inhalation injury to the laryngeal and pulmonary mucosa. A pulse ox less than 85% will result in intubation; otherwise supplemental oxygenation with a ...


2

Most trilogies or series follow chronological order, but there's no requirement. Do whatever serves your story. As long as it's clear to your reader what's happening when in relation to other events, you can present events in whatever order works for you.


2

The previous answers are pretty good, contributing my penny. If you are writing a trilogy, you are talking about a specific set of characters which are time bounded (can exist for a specific period of time it's upto you to make them live in all 3 books and/or show their ancestors-descendants) in other 2 books. If you are depicting same people throughout ...


1

My two cents! Which cost me significantly more after this morning's referendum result, mind you... What's conflict? Conflict exists when one desire is opposed to another. The opposing desires can belong to two different characters: Batman wants to punch Joker in the face But Joker wants to not be punched in the face Or the opposing desires ...


1

There is nothing wrong here it just feels you don't like your conflict to be nerve gripping and mind boggling. I understand your concern and find it very genuine cause as long as you don't satisfy your own nerve you won't be happy about what outcome will be. I know you never asked about probable conflicts but I wrote them cause I feel you are not happy ...


1

Excellent question, to which you have partially provided your own answer, though you don't seem to realize it. You said: The goal is to catch whoever did the crime, or maybe prove he's guilty. There's nothing really standing in the way of that, unless you count the detectives' simple ignorance of all the facts. And that hardly seems like it could ...


1

It depends entirely on your story and what you are trying to achieve. Certainly, most trilogies and pulp series are chronological, but there are a number that flow between eras. The one thing they all need, though, is something to connect the separate eras/characters/stories together. One example is Traci Harding's Ancient Future trilogy, which tells a ...


1

As far as superpowers are concerned you are limited by your imagination. Extracting the substance dreams are made of, or reading minds, or changing form and appearance, being invisible, being at many places at the same time, time-travelling, controlling the elements fire, water, wind, space, earth could be some of the superpowers that come to my mind. Thank ...


1

I like to do in person research. In my experience I've had many people more than happy to let me use them as the basis for a character, or learn terms I need to know. Try hanging out at the emergency room entrance, or visiting a burn ward, and asking the patients about their treatment. A lot of my soldier jargon I get from my friends and family who are ...


1

I really like writing hospital scenes. Can't help with the treatment, but from my experience there are two types of doctors: The sugarcoat These tend to have dialogue like "You'll be just fine!" and "It's not even that bad!" The honest one These people will tell it as it is, no doubt about it. They cut right to the point, and will not lie about the ...


1

You can indicate attraction with nothing more than intense interest. If your characters are secretly attracted to one another, they will watch each other very closely. They will remember each other's likes and dislikes, even when mentioned in passing, and they may use this information to needle each other. Your POV character will think about Thomas a lot. ...


1

Plenty of novels revolving around government conspiracies have been published already, just look at The girl who kicked the hornet nest and Soylent Green (those are the first examples I could think about). Your novel won't be seen as a radical, because it's fiction. If you wanted to write a non-fiction book presenting conspiracy theories as true, you could ...


1

I think you really need to focus on those things that the friend can observe and then conclusions from those observations. This will likely make your descriptions concern the physical manifestations. Not "lust for blood" but maybe "behaving like a berserker" or "in a frenzy." What other odd things might the friend notice? And please don't rely on the "not ...


1

Describe whatever the viewpoint character notices and has opinions about. In a naughty story, the characters might choose their attire to have certain effects on other people, or to express certain aspects of their attitudes, mood, or desires. Which means that the characters will have opinions about their attire and the attire of others. So describe ...


1

I've had a related discussion with my wife two weeks ago about whether there's anything significant about men writing a female protagonist and women writing a male protagonist. For example, Robin Hobb writing about FitzChivalry, or Witi Ihimaera writing about Paikea. In the end, my wife and I concluded together that the protagonist's gender is really only ...


1

It can work, and quite well. The Ciaphas Cain series (Warhammer 40k) does this to a degree. From the wiki stub: The novels are presented as Cain's personal and often rambling notes. After his death, a third party edited them into a more coherent form, interspersed them with footnotes or snippets of other accounts where Cain's first-person (and self-...


1

Not unless it drives the story forward. Do not describe every outfit the MC puts on, puh-lease! It gets annoying. If they're looking in a mirror, maybe, but otherwise I don't see a reason for it


1

What I do is usually just sit down and write without thinking, then edit it later. I have a basic idea of a story, but it usually just happens as I go along.



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