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Dark times are coming. Our world is on fire. Our is subjective and may work better. "Whole" is probably unnecessary. No one can stop them. Even so, we fight back. And despite our efforts, This doesn't repeat the word "fighting". All hope seems lost. But we don't give up. We fight... and we will ...


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I think it would depend on whether or not Russia exists in 'Nuvo'. If it doesn't it might be confusing to the reader and may take away from the over all fantastical feel of the story.


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I would agree with Mr. Shiny that the simplest way might be to say that they are speaking in their 'strange language,' and then just tell the reader what they said in English. For example: "I should think not," said the witch, still speaking in her strange tongue. If you do NOT want the reader to understand the witch, a made-up language would be ...


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They can. They can use the language itself within a book without specifying which is the matching language of the real world. So if you have a fantasy world with witches who speak a "strange language", you can put the words in russian and never tell within the story that this is a real language spoken by real people.


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I have seen books where the author prefaces the book by saying it's a translation of some other-worldly book, and then goes on to use real-world languages as a stand-in for the in-world languages. Tolkien did this to a minor degree when he used some more archaic English words for the Rohirrim, whose language was meant to be like an older form of the ...



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