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8

Lots of writers start writing with no idea where it will go, much less how it will end. Dean Wesley Smith has a book about that, called Writing Into the Dark. On the other hand, I once heard Richard North Patterson claim that "Any mystery writer who starts without knowing the end is committing authorial malpractice." (The next time I read one of his books, ...


6

This is a classic "cabbagehead character," who allows you to gradually unveil your worldbuilding as he leaves his isolation and goes out into the larger community. Nothing wrong with this at all. First example I can think of is Garion from David and Leigh Eddings' pentology The Belgariad (and second pentology The Malloreon). He is exactly what you describe:...


3

To be honest, it's pretty much the same. It's the same scenario, same context, and generates roughly the same conflict. But well, generally speaking, people tend to find the "boy in the body of a girl" funnier, maybe because of how we are conditioned to expect masculinity and toughness from men. Also because of how little we understand about the ...


3

Some people talk about Plotters vs. Pantsters. A Plotter works out the whole book, chapter by chapter, point by point, then writes to the outline. It takes a long time up front, but then writing can progress quite quickly. A Pantster, on the other hand, writes by the seat of his or her pants, sitting down, clearing his mind, and then writing what comes. ...


3

For me, it doesn't matter whether I know where a story is going or not, because I can only type so fast. I love to flesh out characters and plot out outlines while I'm preparing to write, but once I start writing, all bets are off. The finished product rarely looks like I thought it would as I started typing the opening scene. That used to bother me, but ...


2

Are you sure you have to justify to the reader why you've chosen to write about certain people in a certain century? Sure, there is the question, why does the story start here? But it could be as simple as your protagonist has come of age and are starting to see his abilities manifest, or some antagonist has finally found a proof that the magic ones exists ...


2

Most trilogies or series follow chronological order, but there's no requirement. Do whatever serves your story. As long as it's clear to your reader what's happening when in relation to other events, you can present events in whatever order works for you.


2

The most important thing (the only important thing?) is the end result--and that someone reads it. Of course, the process to get there is important, because, duh, it's how we get there! But any way you do it, if it turns out good, it's a good process. It's your process! Imitation is important - feel free to pick and choose from other people's processes - ...


2

Not all writers know exactly where they're going when they start writing. Sometimes, they don't even know what the first turning point will be until they pick up the pen, or get on the computer, and start typing/writing. If you're not quite sure about the story-line yet, then maybe starting the first chapter is exactly what you need to do to get the creative ...


2

The previous answers are pretty good, contributing my penny. If you are writing a trilogy, you are talking about a specific set of characters which are time bounded (can exist for a specific period of time it's upto you to make them live in all 3 books and/or show their ancestors-descendants) in other 2 books. If you are depicting same people throughout ...


1

It depends entirely on your story and what you are trying to achieve. Certainly, most trilogies and pulp series are chronological, but there are a number that flow between eras. The one thing they all need, though, is something to connect the separate eras/characters/stories together. One example is Traci Harding's Ancient Future trilogy, which tells a ...


1

You see three options: 1) I like history so I like option 1. 2) involves a change in the abilities or plans or desires of Earthlings who go to the secondary world, so that more of them change things there. This involves a sociological change in all Earthlings in recent history, or a change in a small subset of Earthlings that you define as the ones able ...



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