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6

I believe that the traditional sense of the term fairy tale is used for a fairly concise story that is written to appeal mainly to children. The general context of a fairy tale would be the standard "Once upon a time.... and they lived happily ever after, THE END" Generally these stories involved magic, fantasy characters and creatures, and were meant to ...


6

This is something that has been done successfully in the past by authors like Douglas Adams and Frank Herbert, but it has to be done just right or you'll run the risk of annoying readers, like you said. If you end a chapter in a cliffhanger, and then begin the next chapter with a five paragraph essay on the boll weevil and its habitat, you'll probably find ...


4

Readers are unlikely to get irritated. This is a fairly well-known practice, and if you keep it short, so the intro doesn't detract from the actual story, it works quite well. There are several variations you can use on this theme, in fact. For example, Orson Scott Card's classic Ender's Game was written in a third-person limited viewpoint following Ender ...


3

There are several distinctive elements that differentiate fairy tales from modern fantasy, if we understand "modern fantasy" to mean "the modern literary genre established by authors such as J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis, and the various sub-genres that have emerged from it since." Scope: A fairy tale takes place close to home for the character. Jack ...


2

If you keep the reader engaged, and provide them enough interesting aspects of the story and a strong hook, then the II occurring at 10K probably won't be a problem. One thing I would recommend, though, is allowing yourself the luxury of writing the story to the story's requirement, rather than a word count. If the movement of the story goes longer than ...


2

These are probably evolving terms rather than hard and fast divisions, but what I would say distinguishes fairy tales from fantasy is that a fairy tale is a tale about a human being encountering fairy folk, who represent a danger to ordinary human life. Fairies have been Disnified in recent years, but Yeats poem "The Stolen Child" ...


2

A fairytale is a more palatable way of demonstrating a moral or ethical lesson to your audience. No-one wants to be preached to but if the lesson is couched in an entertaining form - in this case a story - then they will listen and, despite themselves, learn. The reason for the fantasy elements is part of this. By using otherworldly characters, creatures ...


2

Opening extracts or poems give a slightly old-fashioned feel to a book, so if that's the goal, it could work. In Dune, the extracts are a constant reminder that this is a story of an epic struggle in future history. However, if the point is to shoehorn in more information, the beginning of a chapter is not the best place to do it. If the information is ...


2

As long as "a few words" is less than 50, sure, go for it. It's additional interstitial information which can be useful to the reader, or can at least add background and flavor. More than two paragraphs about the Merovingian boll weevil will probably annoy people, so keep it brief. If you need more than that, either make it a prologue or find some way for ...


1

All stories are morality plays. That is, they all deal with moral questions and moral choices. They may express very different moral viewpoints, but to make a satisfying story, they have to speak to the moral concerns, beliefs, or experiences of real readers. Because stories are fundamentally moral in character, you are free to change the settings and the ...


1

mathematico-logical : fairy tales are a sub-set of fantasy tales/stories. for a second grade, one would want a short story with a happy ending. a story with a moral to it is a fable (a la AEsop or LaFontaine), a different sub-set.


1

Realism is just another style, fiction is never reality. With that said, unrealistic characters can make it harder to suspend disbelief, identify with the characters or care about them, regardless of genre. If you are discarding realism, you need to have a good reason. Most adults don't find characters and plots that are pure wish-fulfillment to be very ...


1

The “Fantasy” genre is stories that are “fantastical” — not stories that are unrealistic wish-fulfillment. If I write a book where the main character is a total loser who wins the lottery and travels the world dating the most beautiful people, that is not a “Fantasy” genre book. That story has wish-fulfillment but it is not fantastical. If the characters ...


1

In this specific case, I'd be very surprised if your child's teacher expected you to define it narrowly. Any fantasy story would probably be acceptable. In general, however, a fairy tale is a short story with archetypal characters and plotlines. According to wikipedia the characters and settings are usually drawn from European folklore, however, there are ...


1

One of the best things about those stories, especially the Final Fantasy series, is that the technology changes drastically from continent to continent and village to village. In most cases there is the evil empire or corporation that is technologically superior, but only because they cull it from everything and everyone around them. The poverty stricken ...


1

I don't think it's necessarily what's common. It's more about what you want to do. As long as your bridging conflicts are engaging and your characters are given goals and pre-arcs, and are characterized in an engaging way during the setup, you should have no problem with this. I know that in Jaws (even though it isn't a fantasy), the author gives us the ...


1

Legally, in the US or the UK or countries with a similar legal tradition, the older the quote, the more famous the person quoted, and the more famous the quote itself, the safer you are. Quotations from works that are centuries old, as well as very famous quotes from the modern era, are held to have passed into the public domain. If you have specific reason ...


1

I wanted to give another answer that goes in a different direction than my first. Write down every detail about what you're dumping about. Then look at each detail. Is it REALLY vital that the character know everything that there is to know about the entire history and every nuance of the magic? Probably not. You may feel it's vital, but it's probably not. ...


1

This is a complex question. The business of balancing information and story is always tricky. One good approach is to give minimal information, then bury further descriptions in the course of the story. Tolkien often works like this. He offers a brief description of a character's appearance, and other details appear in the course of the story. He does the ...


1

This is tricky, because you can't explain the way magic without, you know... explaining the way magic works. The trick is to make it interesting. I think one of the best examples I've seen comes from The Final Empire, the first Mistborn book by Brandon Sanderson. It opens on a plantation on a very foggy night, with the arrival of a traveler, Kelsier. The ...



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