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The already posted answers concentrate on the technical aspects. Although I am not a lawyer, I would like to dare to try to write an answer about the legal aspects. In most parts of the world (at least those parts which follow the Berne Convention), copyright is automatic. The moment you create a creative work, you have exclusive copyright over it. A ...


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If your work is visible to the public, you cannot prevent plagiarism. You could reduce the likelihood of plagiarism by posting your work on a site that is protected by a password (and perhaps a user agreement). But this also reduces availability. You can perhaps increase your chances of detecting plagiarism by setting up a Google alert for one or more ...


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If they're on the Internet, someone has a copy of them. They are free now, and you will never have full control of them again. I won't swear to it, but I think when EL James got her book contract for the Fifty Shades trilogy, she deleted all the posted versions of those stories (which were after all Twilight fanfic). I seem to recall that older versions ...


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If the original work is still protected by an existing copyright, then the only way any form of fan fiction could be published would be with the permission of the original author or copyright owner. The reason for this is that fan fiction by its very nature is considered a derivative of the original, and a copyright protects the owner against any derivative ...


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We aren't lawyers, and I don't think there's a single hard and fast rule for this. Rights can vary depending on geography, time, and author preference. There are works which are now in the public domain which anyone can adapt, so, for example, any Sherlock Holmes story which uses elements which Conan Doyle wrote before 1923 can be legitimately published ...



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