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19

As long as you approach it with good writing practices and treat it as you would your own real writing project, it can help you practice the art of putting words on paper. What it will not prepare you for, however, is world-building, which is the other half of the battle when you write, and is just as important as your ability to write. You can be a ...


12

In general, I feel that fanfic is a crutch that keeps a lot of people from honing their craft and moving on to original fiction. After years of NaNoWriMo and some side work with an editor, I've only seen one person start with fanfic and graduate to doing their own, thoroughly original work. It's like they're just too scared to ever leave their comfort ...


12

I promise you, if you do it without permission and get published nonetheless, they will sue the shit out of you. You have to ask for permission, there will be legal contracts, because the world's "owner" wants money, your story must really fit and must not disrupt anything the owner wants to do in the future. So, if you have a name and are already ...


10

If you are writing it to make money: don't. If the world created gives you inspiration and makes you sit down and write for hours, then go ahead and do it. It's your mind, and you can write whatever you want as long as it's not published. Let people/editors/whoever read it, and if the feedback tells you it is really, really good, the you can contact the ...


6

Some writers will tell you that writing fan fiction is lazy, uncreative, a fruitless endeavor, and a waste of time. Personally I don't think that's true. Fan fiction is great practice for writing, learning how to plot, and learning how to characterize, etc. There are plenty of fan fic writers who are highly praised as "being better than the original", ...


6

The problem with fan fiction is that it will always be tied down to the source material, and can't really become more than what it is. They're a sidetrack rather than a stepping stone. Okay, to reword that first paragraph: If you are going to draw from a source material, be aware that you are creating a branch of the source material. You're creating ...


5

In a situation like this, I'd probably use what's often called a "lampshade," which is where you make an unusual or strange event more acceptable to your audience by pointing it out. For example, if a character with money problems suddenly wins the lottery, it seems like lazy writing; but if a character with money problems suddenly wins the lottery and then ...


5

I have encountered numbers of excellent fanfics out there which could stand out on their own, and be excellent works by themselves if the author just didn't constrain himself into the pre-created world. I'm not saying that you should always create your own worlds, but when you're confident about your work and people start to appreciate it, it might be a ...


5

It's a crutch. The scariest thing about writing is the idea that nobody will like (or even understand) the stories and characters you create. Writing fanfic is an attempt to dodge that risk by using stories and characters that are already well liked and well understood instead. The problem is that you never learn anything without taking a risk, and so by ...


5

I know many people who started out writing fanfiction and then turned this into the basis of a professional career. Off the top of my head, both Paul Cornell and Una McCormack both started by writing fanfic and are now professional authors. Unfortunately it can be all too easy to spend all of your time there. If you think you'll enjoy it, write fanfic by ...


4

Normally this kind of statement would appear by itself at the beginning of your material. With a print magazine, there are a couple of options. One option would be to place it as small print in a footer on the cover. Another would be to place it by itself in regular print on the very first page inside the cover. The latter would probably be the best option. ...


4

I read recently (I think in a review of CBS's Elementary) that technically every adaption of Sherlock Holmes after Conan Doyle is "fanfiction" in a sense, and it's easy to see that some are really excellent stories. (::cough::BBC Sherlock::cough::) Those movies and TV series may be "continuing someone else's story," but you can't argue that they aren't ...


4

how can I help the reader understand at the beginning of the story that I am not writing fanfic? Unless it's published on a fan-fiction website or otherwise marked as a fanfic, I would generally assume that a work put before me was 'original'. I think this is the case for most people. The problem is likely down to one of two things: either your friends ...


4

Obviously there's no one answer to this. These are simply my observations on dealing with this issue: I've found writing in LaTeX to be quite liberating; by planning the rough shape of the story (sections or chapters) I can then create a separate module that will contain each chapter or section. Each module contains a comment at the top with the rough ...


3

I have struggled with the some of the same problems myself. Life always seems to come before writing. Here's some of the things I've learned over the last few years: Don't try to write a chapter - Jot down your ideas as they come to you. That's very important because you will forget what you want to write when you want to write! Then when you have time, go ...


3

Alexander has a good point. Another possible approach is to get back to basics. The original meaning of the word demon was 'functionary spirit', that is a minor spirit that performed a single particular task e.g. guarding someone's hearth in their home. Some joker who knew this etymological tidbit at the dawning of the email protocol decided to call the ...


2

It is not a crutch. Writing is writing. As Jeff Atwood put it: The process of writing is indeed a journey of discovery, one that will last the rest of your life. It doesn't ultimately matter whether you're writing a novel, a printer review, a Stack Overflow answer, fan fiction, a blog entry, a comment, a technical whitepaper, some emo ...


2

I agree with most of the answers here: put all that effort and creativity into your own work, instead of standing on someone else's. Aside from that, some authors get very upset at the idea of other writers taking their creations and putting them into stories.


2

I think fanfic can a very good training ground. They have provided characters, settings and most importantly audience. That lets you focus on hone your other skills. The biggest advantage is that it has a built in audience that tends to review what you've done. You get feedback and that is the most valuable thing you can get. Think of it as a form of ...


2

If you're creating this for a Quark tutorial, it's reasonable to assume that it will most frequently (if not always) be seen in the context of "someone learning Quark" rather than "accidentally winds up on newsstand or coffee table." So I don't think you need to put it on the cover. If you are parodying a magazine, then a magazine has a colophon, which is a ...


2

Keep in mind that Doctor Who is not written by one man. The list of screenwriters is actually very, very long: List of Doctor Who writers. You might argue that, to a certain degree, most of them actually wrote fan fiction, since they were not the original creators of the series, but fan fiction that became canon once the episodes were filmed and aired ;) ...


2

Generally, the acceptability of fan fiction depends on the original story. As another post stated, some origianl authros are fine with it, while others are not. In the case of Dr. Who, apparently the producers are okay with it because I found at least a dozen different fan sites and such that contained hundreds of fan fiction articles, including one that had ...


2

First... <<< Not a lawyer and I think you mean "write a science fiction story" rather than "write a story about science fiction". If you really do want to write about Star Wars the franchise, that's journalism, and unless you're passing off someone's work as your own you don't generally need to worry about copyright problems with using parts of ...


2

Work backwards. Visualize the completed work in it's entirety In Dr. Wayne W. Dyer's PBS special 'Excuses Be Gone' he recommends actually having the cover sleeve made before trying to sit and write. Break it down In writing research papers, I usually start with having a full outline of each section, including figures. With a book, however, there is no ...


2

You're a pokefarm user too, yay! Uh... anyway... Is this a problem? Am I doing something wrong by writing these stories? I assume you're asking this in a legal sense, and it's not a problem if you're not making profit from it. Make sure you've got disclaimers and all that good stuff. If' you're not asking in a legal sense, then: You can write whatever ...


1

YES. You have ownership rights over anything and everything you write. Just because you happened to wrote a work so derivitive it's unpublishable without express permission of someone else doesn't mean you lose your copyright; it just means that you can't do anything with what you wrote. Literature is likely filled with characters who began within ...


1

I am not a lawyer, so the conclusions (in parenthesis) are merely assumptions. Character copyright is separate from the copyright of the work this character appears in. (If you turn this around, it means that a character who did not appear in any of the works you are writing fanfiction of, cannot yet be copyrighted. In fact, the copyright of any of the ...


1

Is there any way of knowing what ideas I can use without infringing the copyright of the original work? You mean, aside from either asking permission from the copyright holder, or going ahead and publishing something and then successfully defending yourself against a claim of copyright infringement? No, not really. Disney, and LucasArts before them, has a ...


1

IANAL - not a lawyer I strongly doubt that writing your story as fan fiction gives you any legal rights that you would not have otherwise. However, if the Star War franchise has been tolerating fan fiction without taking any legal action, you can draw two consequences: the franchise is probably not likely to pick on you more than on anyone else; not ...


1

One of the difficulties you face is that of passing off. Ironically the better the job you do of (affectionately) parodying the visual style of the products you celebrate, the greater the risk that a reasonable person might be mislead into believing that your work is actually from the famous brand and hence infringes on their trademarks.



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