Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

It's actually totally easy. Just let your characters interact with their environment in a natrual way. Here's a real world example, showing different systems of paying the fare for a public bus: Out of breath from running to the bus stop, John was still struggling with the ticket machine when the bus approached around the corner. (Konstanz, Germany) ...


11

Short answer: Give hints along the book. Make the character notice stuff. It will make the "dump" shorter, even convert it into a short reference to scenes that happened. Find a way to imbue feelings or actions in the section. More on that: Include at least some action. Surely there is something that sets off this train of thought. Try and be as brief ...


8

Is there's anything distinctive about the people of the area? Something that you could show in her rural location and then have her find familiar or comforting in the city? Alternatively, cities tend to have a wide range of people in them, so maybe there is some element of the xenotic (apparently not a word) that you could use to contrast with everyone ...


6

Ryan, you cannot guess what will be interesting to your readers. Viktor Frankl, when he wrote his classic book "Man's search for meaning", didn't want to share his personal story first, as he thought it would look like he wanted sympathy, and distract from his message. Yet because of his personal story, his book became a best seller, and helped expand his ...


5

If you think there is too much exposition, there probably is. Then again, even if you don't think so, the reader may. The fact that you are questioning is the important part. Asking these questions forces you to make choices. Making decisions (and sticking to them) is a crucial part of the process. I would say that pretty much anything can be ...


3

The ancient mantra of "show, don't tell". Bad news: Your work will grow. For one paragraph of "tell" there's usually a page or two of "show". Good news: Your work will be more interesting. For one boring paragraph of "tell" there's a page or two of interesting "show". Create side-threads unrelated to the main story, that use the elements of exposition as ...


3

Is there a good reason for the expository sections to be in the book? If you were to remove them entirely, would the book suffer? If the answers to both of these questions is "no", then I suggest removing these sections entirely, or at the least paring them down. However, things are rarely so simple. Sometimes writers put scenes in a book simply for color, ...


3

Yes, self-doubt is part of the process. Write it, polish it as much as you can bear, and hand it off to some friends who are capable of giving you good feedback. Or find a professional editor. Particularly for an autobiography, you should get an outside opinion (or six) about what in your life might interest others.


3

The point is all novels require info dumps, but you as the author has to find a way of putting across the information as entertainly as possible. To do it entirely as narration is a major fail. Consider the Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham. He had to put about three major info dumps in that novel. In one he used a flashback to get across the origin of ...


2

The common way to remove info dumps is to sprinkle the knowledge throughout the book, as the character encounters it or thinks about it. Might that work here? That is: Sprinkle some of the revelations and the MC's doubts earlier into the story. The MC might have a puzzle, then let it go without resolving it. Or experience a moment of doubt, but then talk ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible