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There is a lot of debate about essay structure, but the way I teach it (and use myself)is: Introduction: 1) re-state the topic positively e.g. 'Solar power is better than wind power.' if the topic was 'Which is better, solar or wind power?' 2) outline your argument briefly. Body: take each point from your outline and write about it, using the point as your ...


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An introduction needs to do two jobs --it should give an overall global context for your writing, and it should offer readers a preview of what you are going to tell them. There are many possible ways to do that. One structure I learned in high school that I have personally found valuable is called the funnel paragraph. The idea is that you begin your ...


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"Affirmative action as a detriment/hindrance" "Affirmative Action: Doing more harm than good." Go over your essay and see if there are any good "tag lines" think of how a movie comes up with the trailer. The title should reflect the overall point of the essay, or be a short version "elevator pitch" of your first paragraph, the one thats usually all, "over ...


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In an essay one should most importantly introduce the topic and have a clear contention. Quotes from novels and such can be a good lead-in sentence. An effective introduction should interest the reader of the essay and make them want to continue reading.


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The key in writing is consistency. If you use an Oxford Comma, use it every time. If you use "one," instead of "he/she," use it throughout the entire essay (I.e. "One may not feel..." As opposed to "He may not feel..."). What your grader is probably saying is "jarring" (which I agree, inconsistency is jarring and pulls you out), is that your writing isn't ...


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As others have said, pick one and stick to it. I think the Bermuda shorts analogy posted by Chris Sunami is pretty on point. My undergraduate degree is a double major in Philosophy and Communication Studies: Philosophy-style essays are more commonly written in the first person, whereas the Communication Studies expects the more traditional third person ...


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I work in a university doing research and many of my personal friends are regularly publishing academic authors. From my observation I can say that those writing in a highly formal style talk like they write in private, too. It is their language. They read almost exclusively formal writing, they converse in it about sophisticated topics, and they use it when ...


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In general, when you write, you want to pick a single register, appropriate to the audience and your goals, and stick to it. When you do that, your voice recedes appropriately into the background, and the reader can focus on your content. An informal phrase in a formal essay is like showing up to a corporate workplace in Bermuda shorts and a t-shirt. The ...


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It is traditional to write essays in the third person. I can remember teaching students to avoid the first person. That said, particularly if the assessment criteria asks for personal response, institutions/examining bodies may be quite happy with the first person. You have to look at sample answers, etc. and work out what they want. On the point of ...



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