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5

You will probably come to find that different writing styles suit different purposes. This is taught in most writing classes, usually with discussion of "audience" or "target" or "purpose". So you've already found one style (formal academic writing) that works for one audience and purpose. That doesn't mean it's the only way you can write. Your post here ...


4

What a great question! Your instincts are good. "Excessively ornamented and often times convoluted" writing may earn you high marks in a class, or even in academia. But in the real world setting, simple and direct gets the job done. I have 3 pieces of advice that I've learned from others (or learned the hard way) over the years: Vocabulary, vocabulary, ...


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Excessive concission always seems affected. Feel free to increase the words to idea ratio. Ignore the unimportant ideas as a way to cut verbosity. If you want your words to have a greater impact, say less and only say what matters. My greatest asset in limiting my vocabulary choice is to remember which words my little sister uses. If you are an only child ...


3

Chris is right in saying that a formal tone/neutral voice minimizes individual stylistic differences, but I want to caution you that the difference between the writing of a native English speaker and a non-native speaker can sometimes be fairly obvious. It's in part because non-native speakers tend to have learned grammar and style in classes, whereas native ...


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I think the problem is less style itself than the fact that your readers are taking your writing style as indicative of a problematic attitude. Let's take the sentences you highlighted and the suggested improvements as a guide: Two linguists have read this work and left positive feedback. Based on the suggested improvements, I'm guessing this reads as ...


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According to Blakesley & Hoogeveen's Writing: A Manual for the Digital Age, you should write "Work Cited" if there's only one source.


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If the reader is firmly in the character's POV, and expects to remain firmly in the character's POV, this is jarring and can throw the reader right out of the story. If the reader is firmly in an omniscient, opinionated narrator's POV, and is prepared to dip in and out of characters' heads, this works just fine. For this to work, you have to prep the ...


2

There are a few relevant factors: Use diagrams when they add value I see plenty of formal writing that includes diagrams -- technical flow diagrams, trend graphs, timelines, resource-allocation charts, and more. The main question you should be asking yourself is: does this diagram add value? Does it make my point more clearly, compactly, or persuasively ...


2

Many people struggle to grasp big ideas. In your case, you need to break one main idea down into three. When I write, I like to think of it as explaining it to a child. You are going to sit down and explain your essay to a seven-year old child who fully grasps the English language, but only has the attention span to last about four or five sentences. Pick ...


1

I think that in the context of the blog you linked you can drop "I would argue" without losing anything. It's already implied that what you're writing about are your own thoughts and opinions. However, if you spend some time in a post citing scientific findings or other hard facts and then give your own opinion, "I would argue" is useful for transitioning ...


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In addition to what Monica Cellio said, whose answer I'd take to heart given that it is rife with solid reasoning, if you decide to include charts or diagrams in school applications and/or cover letters, be very careful how large you make them and the amount of visual prominence you give them. Don't Let the Graphic Replace Your Writing... If you make ...


1

It sounds like you're sick of the 'nut graf'. Broadly speaking, it's a paragraph explaining why the topic is worthwhile. Writers are often trained to use it. It answers the question 'Why should anyone care about this article?' That's potentially useful for a reader who happens on the article while browsing. But in your case, you're specifically hunting for ...


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I've noticed that too. I'm certain it's because the first paragraph becomes the excerpt in Facebook (or LinkedIn or wherever). And because there's no useful information in the excerpt you're forced to click through to see the rest of the article. It's all about the clicks. All about the money.


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First, stay away from expressions like "in my opinion." It's your essay; this is understood, increases word count, and takes time if the essay is in an exam situation. Second, this is a topic with a GREAT DEAL of social science research. If you have an unlimited time frame, this is the sort of thing you can at least get as far as Wikipedia. Some of the data ...


1

Medium is probably what you are looking for. It is like Twitter, except instead of 140 character messages, you publish full-length articles, and instead of other users following you, they follow keywords that are like sections of a magazine. So you might tag your articles “inspiration” and Medium users who are following the “inspiration” tag will see your ...


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I think it's pretty common to refer to the main character in a story as "the hero" or "the main character", or, as you say, "the protagonist". If the writer doesn't give him a name, you could use one of these terms. Or shift between them for variety. As @DoWhileNot suggests, if you can give the character a brief description, use that. Like, "the husband", "...


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There isn't really a single conventional word that is used, I believe. Protagonist might work, but it's pretty dry. I'd say in this case, for this story, it might be better to use a more descriptive word, or combination of words that identify the man more directly. Start by looking at the character's relationships with the other characters in the story - ...


1

An essay is an essay is an essay. What I mean by that is, so long as you do not have specified requirements given to you by a professor or a publisher, your essay can reflect anything and everything you want to have included. If you do choose to put it into circulation- which I will almost always encourage people to try- depending on how you release it, you ...


1

Call it a (short?) book because many of the elements you've listed are commonplace in books. You also hint that this project is growing, so it might in the end, fill the space between boards, but either way, many masterpieces have also been notable for their brevity. Good luck.


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It sounds like you may be getting bogged down with semantics. After all, what is a foreword besides an introduction, really? There is a a sizeable portion of the academic community that is exploring academic-as-creative writing. For example, using poetry as part of an essay or find a different way of presenting an idea than the standard MLA-cited article. ...


1

If you're not submitting this as part of any assignment or for publication in a standardized format, where there are rules about content and structure, I say go for it. Foreword, dedication, acknowledgments, preface, interstitial matter, footnotes, afterword, index, glossary, colophon, reader survey — whatever you want to add. If you are submitting it for ...


1

The reference is abbreviated to the minimum required to clarify the source. For example, the work first referenced as: 7 Jane Doe, "Infinitely Anonymous," Every Knows My Name, 2nd ed., I Am Jane Doe (New York: Jane Doe Publishing, 2016) 42-43 on the second and subsequent reference would become either: 8 Doe 45 (if you use only one book by that author, or)...


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Most importantly: I am not a lawyer. Get professional legal advice. The key is whether or not your use of the copyrighted material constitutes "fair use." Fair use can be difficult to determine. Whether you make money is one factor, but there are others. The amount of material you use, for example. You can't copy "a substantial" amount of another work, even ...


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Ah, I remember the five paragraph essay days. They are as structured as a sonnet and the point of practicing them is to focus your writing. The thesis statement is your entire essay summarized in one sentence. I have an easier time writing it last, but you may have a different experience. Looking at your essay, I can't tell if you are writing about freedom,...


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It's impossible to know for sure without seeing the paragraphs, but yes, formal writing is generally done in a "neutral voice," which tends to minimize the impact of individual stylistic differences. Of course, a gifted writer can still manage to convey a distinctive authorial voice, even in a formal register, but unless you've striven for that, you ...


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For class, write whatever gives you a good grade. Otherwise, write for yourself. You already know what gives you that feeling of repulsion. Trust that feeling. Write for yourself.


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A word repeated too many times in close confines can sound trite, but look at the would-be repetition as an opportunity to exercise your creativity. Instead of looking for a synonym, consider the places where you would repeat Norwegian as opportunities to provide more information about the subject. To learn more about Norwegian, I meet with Dr Bångun ...


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Well, I do not know what have you written in your thesis statement. However, I will give you some advice on how to do it better. First of all, if you need to comment the quote, then do not write what has been already written. Write your opinion and stick it to the end, providing a lot of good reasons for it. Your professor will like it. Also, it would be ...



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