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6

Different schools have different methods (for example, some insist that the last line of the introduction must be the thesis statement), but I learned that a "conclusion" is essentially reiterating the essay. So they summarize each paragraph in one or two sentences, and that's the conclusion. From the old saw about speeches with introductions and ...


5

An abstract is a quick summary or overview of the entire piece. It's used for search results (manual or computerized) — basically, the reader is saying, "Is this the piece I need as a source for X task?" The introduction can vary in information and tone. It can be the classic "Tell 'em what you're going to tell 'em," it can be a way to guide the ...


3

A one-word sentence in the beginning of an essay isn't cliche. I think you'd be in a different ballpark if we were talking about a one-word sentence beginning a piece of creative writing. But as far as using the one-word sentence at all, I think it depends on your audience. If you're writing this essay for an English class, my suggestion is... don't do ...


3

As user8789 says, there are formulas to calculate the reading level of a sample of text. Personally, I wouldn't take these too seriously. For example, consider this paragraph: The children were playing with a soccer ball in the yard, and when Bethany kicked it, it went way over the fence, into the neighbor's yard, and then it rolled very far down the ...


3

Read books published for that age range / reading level. This gives me a general feel for themes, characters, plot compexity etc. Find definitions of those levels. Often publishers explain how they define the reading levels on their website for parents (who buy the books) to understand where their own child ranges. (Children's reading level varies greatly ...


3

I see some opportunities to add sensory details: What do you see or hear that tells you the camp is really old? How did the slides differ from each other? The swings? How many people in the camp group playing on the playground? What were the others doing? What sounds did they make? What did you see? How were you swinging? Gently? Risky high swings? ...


3

In general, using the same word repeatedly tends to sound strange. You should try to vary it up. But at the same time, you don't want to use words or phrasing that are too unusual, and you don't want to use alternative words in a way that might make it unclear to the reader that you are talking about the same person or thing. For example, if you wrote, "My ...


2

I'm leaning towards using the method mentioned @Mussri. Which would result in the following This essay will compare The Propaganda of Saints in the Middle Ages(henceforth , Propaganda of Saints)by Esther Cohen and What is Propaganda and How Does it Differ from Persuasion(henceforth Propaganda vs. Persuasion)? By Garth Jowett and Victoria ...


2

I don't know what will satisfy your professors, but given the lengths of the tities, I would be tempted to refer to the articles by their authors' names.


2

Either is fine. It's a matter of style. (a) Be consistent. Don't write, "Working in a wide range of positions can improve your experience and make him more successful." Okay, maybe that sentence sounds so obviously wrong that you wouldn't do that. But I've read plenty of things where the writer hops back and forth between second and third person from ...


2

This powerpoint presentation or we can say handouts will definitely help you : http://www.create.cett.msstate.edu/create/classroom/lplan_view.asp?articleID=171 http://www.create.cett.msstate.edu/create/classroom/handouts/Epting_CD2_Set3_Bing_Bang_Bongo_Powerpoint_Handout1_Revised.pdf I think this link provides some examples along with the explanation on ...


2

In the concluding paragraph you should include the following: An allusion to the pattern used in the introductory paragraph. A restatement of the thesis statement, using some of the original language or language that "echoes" the original language. (The restatement, however, must not be a duplicate thesis statement.) A summary of the three main points from ...


2

Though your writing is mechanically sound (except for the misuse of the word "magnanimous") and your thesis is clear, it falls way short of the guidelines simply because it contains too many unsubstantiated editorial comments. By "too many" I mean greater than or equal to one. As a point of reference, I was once dinged on a college essay for sarcastically ...


2

The Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Readability Formula Step 1: Calculate the average number of words used per sentence. Step 2: Calculate the average number of syllables per word. Step 3: Multiply the average number of words by 0.39 and add it to the average number of syllables per word multiplied by 11.8. Step 4: Subtract 15.59 from the result. The ...


1

The abstract should have the main ideas you'll be supporting in your text. You probably don' t want to put ideas in your abstract that conflict with what you're going to be defending but mostly those ideas that you want other people to agree with. Also, don't put everything there, only the main ideas. Writing the abstract is a good exercise on summarizing ...


1

Anything can qualify as allusion. The caveat is, it must go smoothly with the main theme, and contain another, veiled message; it must have a simple main theme, which is different from the theme it alludes to. So, if your quote teaches us two different things, and your introduction is about one of them, it will allude to the other one. You can't just drop a ...


1

If you cite an included full quotation and immediately discuss it phrase by phrase, then you don't have to cite every phrase, every time. That's just silly. I'd go so far as to say it's insulting, as it implies you think your readers are morons. But if the partial quotes are some paragraphs removed from the original quote, with discussion between that ...


1

When using the MLA guideline and quoting a text, if you are introducing any modifications into the quotation, mark the same by placing square brackets [ ] at the appropriate spot. For example (adapted from here) Original quotation: "Reading is also a process and it also changes you." 1) Margaret Atwood wants her readers to realize that ...


1

Here are a few notes: "understated oppression" - doesn't make sense. Reporting on the oppression can be understated, but not the oppression itself. Same with "blithely blinded". The blithely seems to refer to the doer who does the blinding, not the people who are unconcerned about being blinded as was probably your intent. When you start a new thought or ...


1

Conclusions wrap up what you have been saying in your paper. They tie up any loose ends, briefly summarize the focal point of the paper, and ultimately end the paper with any relevant last words. Conclusions As per the linked resource from Purdue's Online Writing Lab: Restate your topic and why it is important, Restate your thesis/claim, Address opposing ...


1

Each school, and even each class within a school, will generally have an accepted style. You need to find out your teacher's expectations, which are usually clearly spelled out in the syllabus. As a rough guideline, classes in the sciences, including psychology, use the American Psychological Association (APA) format, which changes slightly every one to two ...


1

-I assume that by parenthetical citation, you mean the Harvard referencing system. Yes, in that case you write the last name of the author followed by a comma and then the year in which that article appeared (in case of an article being cited). For example, if the article you need to cite is by John Doe published in 1405, then you would write (Doe, 1405). ...


1

Be terse, avoid padding. "The candidate I will be examining is _" is something you would say in a conversation. I doubt that you have to write it that way in your essay. Note down what you want to write about the candidate using bullet points on a scrap of paper and then concentrate on these points without adding the padding. Go directly to the info. ...


1

The abstract should have an opening that identifies that particular subject matter and how the research that you have done will provide a solution. It is very important to make this clear in the initial sentence or two of the abstract as people want to know immediately what the essay is about. An abstract is usually no more than 250 words. It is important to ...



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