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4

Definitely - not just a phrase but at least a paragraph discussing the language, possibly detailing some characteristic points of it, early on. Also note - they aren't necessarily errors. That's a dialect, and as long as the spelling and grammar is true to that dialect, it's not erroneous; it just isn't Standard English. Think of it as quotations in a ...


3

As user8789 says, there are formulas to calculate the reading level of a sample of text. Personally, I wouldn't take these too seriously. For example, consider this paragraph: The children were playing with a soccer ball in the yard, and when Bethany kicked it, it went way over the fence, into the neighbor's yard, and then it rolled very far down the ...


3

A one-word sentence in the beginning of an essay isn't cliche. I think you'd be in a different ballpark if we were talking about a one-word sentence beginning a piece of creative writing. But as far as using the one-word sentence at all, I think it depends on your audience. If you're writing this essay for an English class, my suggestion is... don't do ...


3

Read books published for that age range / reading level. This gives me a general feel for themes, characters, plot compexity etc. Find definitions of those levels. Often publishers explain how they define the reading levels on their website for parents (who buy the books) to understand where their own child ranges. (Children's reading level varies greatly ...


2

Though your writing is mechanically sound (except for the misuse of the word "magnanimous") and your thesis is clear, it falls way short of the guidelines simply because it contains too many unsubstantiated editorial comments. By "too many" I mean greater than or equal to one. As a point of reference, I was once dinged on a college essay for sarcastically ...


2

The Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Readability Formula Step 1: Calculate the average number of words used per sentence. Step 2: Calculate the average number of syllables per word. Step 3: Multiply the average number of words by 0.39 and add it to the average number of syllables per word multiplied by 11.8. Step 4: Subtract 15.59 from the result. The ...


1

For regulation Kids Are Getting Fat Eating School Lunches, But The Government Can Help These Changes In School Lunches Promote the Health of Our Children School Lunch Reform: Do It For the Children Against regulation Get the Government Out of Your Children's Food Parents Should Regulate School Lunches, Not Government Middle of the Road Who Should ...


1

If you don't have enough reliable data to support your claims, then you should state that your findings are based on certain assumptions. It would further help your cause if you then give explanations for why you made those assumptions. Before you do this, however, you should probably make more of an effort to locate data to support your position. Relying ...


1

Any reflection written in an European context is based on a philosophical idea of reasoning. It means the issue is deepened and put in perspective. Each development brings a new nuance. This however, has nothing to do with "not picking a side" (as this has to do with writing a report or a argumentative essay). Any reflection written in an American context ...


1

Being concise is certainly a worthy goal. If you can convey an idea in 300 words that someone else takes 3000 words to express, that's a good thing. On the other hand, if what you write is very short that might mean that you don't have very much to say, or that you didn't do the research to get all the relevant information, or that you didn't think through ...


1

If you cite an included full quotation and immediately discuss it phrase by phrase, then you don't have to cite every phrase, every time. That's just silly. I'd go so far as to say it's insulting, as it implies you think your readers are morons. But if the partial quotes are some paragraphs removed from the original quote, with discussion between that ...


1

When using the MLA guideline and quoting a text, if you are introducing any modifications into the quotation, mark the same by placing square brackets [ ] at the appropriate spot. For example (adapted from here) Original quotation: "Reading is also a process and it also changes you." 1) Margaret Atwood wants her readers to realize that ...


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Here are a few notes: "understated oppression" - doesn't make sense. Reporting on the oppression can be understated, but not the oppression itself. Same with "blithely blinded". The blithely seems to refer to the doer who does the blinding, not the people who are unconcerned about being blinded as was probably your intent. When you start a new thought or ...


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It's impossible to know exactly why you got the scores you did, but what jumps out at me is that your thesis statement doesn't really match the prompt. The prompt is NOT to write an essay simply inspired by Auden's quote, but rather to write an essay taking a stance on whether or not his quote is true. To recast Auden's argument in simpler language: ...


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The comments on your post suggest therapy, and I think it is good advice. This is more than just writer's block or procrastination. It sounds like you have serious anxiety that's triggered by writing. Here are some things you might try if you can't afford a therapist. First, pick a book and copy the text out of it. This will help you get used to the ...


1

Gee, I agree with what. You need a specialist. Something that helped me, though (I was a perfectionist, too) is this quote: "Art is never finished, only abandoned." - Leonardo da Vinci Give up perfection. Look at your writing as something that improves incrementally rather than something that is fixed. You can always come back and edit later; something ...



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