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29

When following up on an e-mail: I usually forward the original e-mail to the original recipient, with some added text at the top. Hello [Name], Have you had time to look into this? Kind Regards, ... Forwarded message: From: .... Date: ... Subject: ... To: ... ...


16

I'd probably go with something on the lines of: Hi [whoever] Just checking that the XXX I sent you on Xth XXX is okay. I have to [do something] with your feedback before I can [do something else]. Can you let me know when you'll be able to look at it for me? Thanks That way, it makes it sound like you're putting yourself in their debt ...


14

Personally I think P.S. is never really 'appropriate' in emails. The whole point of a post-scriptum is it's something you think of after the main text has already been written. By which time in the old days of pen-and-ink you'd have already written your closing lines, and most likely signed it as well. With electronic writing such as emails, just go back ...


7

Emails saying "thank you" for something are generally informal; style is less of an issue than simple gratitude and sincerity. So there's really no problem with your email, unless you've got a particular reason to be concerned about eloquence. If you do want to work in more variety, some good alternatives include: "I really appreciate [X]" or "Your [X] is ...


7

You have several choices, and which one you use depends on the length of the document to be written, the subject matter, and your personal preferences. All sections here are examples of the technique they describe. Outlining The outline of this answer would look like this: Introduction - mention options Outlining - explain, give example Infodump - ...


5

There is no rule that you have to produce an equal volume of words in order for your correspondent to appreciate you. In fact, if you quote every sentence individually, inserting "I agree" or "good point" after each, that's going to lower people's impression of you -- it's a "me, too" reply, only worse because the person has to dig in case you had anything ...


5

Okay, it's clear that you're writing this in a web-based context, so my recommendation is based on the fact that I'm a web-designer first, and a writer second. Quite simply your text is far too long to be useful in any way. It's a sad fact of internet life that people just do not read long-winded instructions/emails. Steve Krug, in his book "Don't Make ...


5

I like suggesting that they may have already done it, in case they have! Dear xxx, If you haven't already, please take a moment to ... If you have, thank you. Regards, xxx


5

"Thank you so much for generously sharing your time and expertise." With additional superlatives and the word "appreciate" as needed.


5

"This project could not be completed without your specific expertise and generous support. Please know you have my deepest thanks." You may want to add some details that characterize your interactions so that the message is a little more personal. The phrase 'specific expertise' is a little vague. Did she provide you with archived recordings of mission ...


5

Punctuation marks where invented to increase readability. So for God's sake, get rid of these semi-colons; my eyes are bleeding. If you really need the differentiation which shall be achieved with the semi-colons (comma and a non-comma-punctuation-mark), I would suggest parentheses: Speakers at tomorrow's conference include James T. Smith (vice ...


5

Good morning XXX, I wanted to touch base with you about the status of your article for the newsletter. Please advise whether you will be able to send it to me by the end of the week. If it doesn't work with your schedule, that's fine; I just need to know one way or the other for planning purposes. Thanks! Regards, [your name]


5

Lauren Ipsum gives a good answer. I'll guess at the purpose of your query and suggest a message along these lines: Dear Dr. X, I recently read your paper, Y, and I was very interested in the proofs you sketched. My research is in a related area: (here you describe your research). Would it be possible for you to send me the complete proofs ...


5

If you want to be cool and scientific, explaining a process, do it in third person. "The subject is, the subject feels". This is the professional mode, very impartial but neither the easies to write nor the easiest to understand. If that's a colleague though, feel free to use whatever you feel like, First person, second, third, first introducing the actors: ...


5

How about something on the lines of "Looking forward to doing business with you With Kind Regards Your name" Or maybe "Best Regards". Consider looking at this list for some nice suggestions.


4

Two common strategies are: Rearrange words Change nouns to verbs if possible Instead of Web Product Provider: Provider of the web product or The web product provides ... Yes, I've shorten your example sentence, because I do not understand it ;)


4

Here's how I write it: Hi - this is just a friendly reminder that I'm waiting for [whatever it is]. Thanks!


4

Formal style in email is appropriate in a variety of situations: job-seeking, academia and business (especially when writing to someone more senior), and when you make a request of someone you don't know personally. If the other person or organization has set the tone first, you may want to try to match it or be only a little more formal in a response; ...


4

Here is a link that I have used in the past to generate some e-mail templates. I ended up creating several as forms in MS Outlook. This link includes links to a few other collections, so you'll find several different examples to cover just about any kind of business e-mail you may need. (These are actually samples of business letters, but you can still ...


4

Welcome user614. You're asking a good question, and if I may restate it: How do I write an effective business e-mail? Like most writing questions, it comes to how you think about the task. And this is the key, to think before you write. Why are you writing? What exactly do you want? To whom are you writing? What do you know about them, their ...


4

Professors and the like have been reading emails for long enough that I bet they know these two conventions that you seem to indicate you're unsure of: Emails, being not letters, contain who they are from in their headers. Email readers display this to the recipient in the way in which the recipient is likely most accustomed to by now. Emails may, or may ...


4

If there is a tight deadline, as you seem to have, I always follow the sentence containing the deadline information with another sentence that says something like, "If you foresee a problem with replying by tomorrow, please let me know that as soon as possible." This gives them a chance to tell you that the deadline is not feasible for them.


4

The most-authoritative page I've seen on this topic is part of a style guide at Western Michigan University. It first points out that most of the recommendations in the guide “are consistent with AP style, which is the standard for the styleguides of most universities and for writing for the Web”, and later lists the following as errors to be avoided, ...


4

A postscript is a passage at the end of a letter, following the signature. It only makes sense in the context of a letter composed by hand or on a typewriter, to accommodate an afterthought when you have already finished your letter, and don't want to retype or rewrite the whole thing again. It makes no sense in an email context - or even a paper letter ...


3

As FumbleFingers already noted, the post scriptum should appear after the main body of the text, perhaps even after the signature. With that said, I do agree with FumbleFingers that the construct likely has no place in E-mail. I would like to additionally point out that there is another use for P.S. besides adding a new thought to the correspondence: I ...


3

1st paragraph: Use parenthesis instead of the comma: We'll email you when the beta begins (you can see our countdown here). Third paragraph: If you say you're not sure what those special features are, it suggest lack of vision, and that you have no idea what you plan on doing in the future (which comes across as being negative). I would suggest ...


3

To add to Kate's answer, you start with "we" then shift to "I" then go back to "we". Also, until you decide what being a VIP member means, what's the point in offering it? And get rid of the "ya'll." It's not cute, it's annoying.


3

I'd simplify it quite a bit: We’re really excited about the launch and we wanted to let you know hat you’ll be the first to get in when we pull back the covers. We ARE really excited, we WANTED to let you know - verb tense issues. Pick one, and stick with it. And mixed metaphor - 'get in' and 'pull back the covers' sound like a bed...but beds ...



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