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15

This is basically a question of marketing strategy. The major pro of DRM is that it helps avoid pirating; the major con is that it limits accessibility and portability, and can annoy readers and users. So it seems to me that the primary consideration should be: "Is pirating going to cost me so much, that I'm better off risking limiting and annoying ...


9

There are a few potential disadvantages that I can see: It isn't necessarily a solution to the biggest issue for new/unknown authors: getting eyes on the page (or screen, in this case). Putting something on the internet alone isn't enough to get people to read, you still need to have produced something of quality (or something so bad it's funny!), have ...


9

DRM has been pretty harmful in my experience with creating and selling information products. I used some fairly heavy handed DRM when I first started out. I realized this was a mistake after taking feedback from my customers and analyzing conversion rates. I ended up doing a lot of testing on implementations of DRM to determine what worked and what did ...


7

Should I e-publish? It depends heavily on your goals, on the effort you're willing/interested in investing, and on your skill with the various abilities involved with e-publishing. If you aim to eventually sell your book to a traditional publisher, then do not e-publish. Traditional publishers will very rarely buy manuscripts that have already been ...


6

If an ebook has DRM, it tends to be tied to a specific reader (actually, a specific physical reader-device). Since devices are, to some extent, short-lived and libraries are (or should arguable be able to be) long-lived, DRM directly harms the end consumer. If the DRM is implemented with call-backs to a central server (not the case, as far as I am aware, ...


4

If it's going to make the reader stop reading, don't do it. Your goal as an author is to absorb the author into your world and make them forget about anything going on around them. If a reader has to stop reading to watch your video or listen to a sound snippet, you're not accomplishing that goal. Instead, you'll annoy your reader and they won't want to ...


4

Do you know how to self promote? Are you already good at it? Are you interested in learning how? Are you highly disciplined? Are you a DIY kind of person? Those are important questions if you are thinking about self-pub. If self promotion/marketing is something you have the discipline to do and passion to excel at, then self-pub becomes a much more ...


4

It varies for each reader, but the majority(at least the vocal majority) say that if I pay for a book, I should own it fully. It should be mine to move to another e-reader, another PC/laptop, or anywhere else. DRM normally doesn't allow this. With DRM, you never really own any book, you just rent it, and it can be removed any time, like it happened with ...


4

Is it wise? In my opinion, yes. I have sold hundreds of e-books using a pen name, and I have recently started publishing other e-books under my own name. I have not spent much time promoting them because I am in the process of writing two new series, and that takes up much of my spare time that I used to spend on promoting and marketing. Now for the "how". ...


3

"Multimedia" can include illustrations, which have been used to accompany text for centuries. In that sense, using multimedia for fiction is well-established. Using music or video to accompany a story is a very interesting idea, and personally I'd encourage you to experiment, as it could be extremely effective. At the same time, doing this sort of ...


3

Money talks. When I see that a novel has the imprint of a professional publishing house, I know that some editor actually convinced his or her boss that this book was worth paying the author money up front, in the expectation that other people would buy the book once it was published. That’s certainly no guarantee of quality, but it does narrow down the ...


2

I think one of the greatest disadvantages is, that the web is not considered to be a media for professional publishing. There are some great books published on the web (for example Butterbrick’s Practical Typography) but most content cannot compete with printed books. So no matter how much you know about your topic, if your website doesn’t look ...


1

As Standback pointed out, it is mainly a marketing issue. Therefore I suggest that you test your market to find the answer. If you write a series of books and offer the first one DRM-free, you can watch the numbers and comments of your customers. After that you can use DRM for the second one (you should explain on your blog/website that you use DRM now and ...



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