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You could make the story lighter by setting some scenes in a peaceful landscape, perhaps in the homes of the characters, showing who they are fighting for. You could have the protagonists suffer defeats and setbacks and hardships in the first chapters, and start to break down, and seem on the verge of defeat. Then have chapters set in the enemy camp,and ...


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This has nothing to do with the source control, so the GIT support in V11 and 12 is a red herring. There is no better way of doing this, as of version 12 (April 2016). What you are doing and your work around are the only two ways I know of doing what you want. In our group, we use Track Changes for the changes that we want the author to review. We don't ...


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What I would do, is give the characters something to look forward to. Give them something to fight for. They need a motivation to keep going, something to comfort them in their time of need. I think by giving the characters this, you'd be able to make them have more courage and generally be happier for what is to come. Always give characters a motivation.


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It is not grammatically correct, no. To be grammatically correct, you would use: "Why are you laughing?" However, if your hero speaks a certain way and it would be natural for him to ask the question like that, then write "why laughing?". It all depends on your story.


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According to Hart's Rules, Section 3.2 Paragraphs has the relevant info: New paragraphs following headings should be ranged full left. New paragraphs not following a heading should be indented one tab. Leave the first line of the story alone, but the dialogue and the paragraphs following should each have a single tab indentation for the first line. ...


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You can talk to real-life veterans and see how they coped with war. One tactic is "gallows humor" or "black humor," which is seeing the humor even in grim moments (common to veterans, law enforcement officers, doctors, and first responders). The TV show MASH was essentially built on this. There are many examples on the TV Tropes page (consider yourself duly ...


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Some of the stories that I have read are incredibly dark, based simply on the events that occur, but did not feel that way when read. Bringing out a lighter side can be done in a number of ways: Characters/ Relationships Having characters that are hopeful or optimistic will go a long way to brightening a story (unless they are annoyingly optimistic to the ...


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Agents and publishers get so many manuscripts that they have to screen them quickly. Anything, especially in those first few pages, that makes you seem no better than average will get you rejected. Most published books are commercial failures. I read that 90% of books for which royalties were advanced do not earn out the advance. Since publishers know they ...


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When you send your work to a publisher or agent or anyone, it should be the best that you can do. Which would you rather read: A story that is the writer's absolute best effort, or a story that he figured was "good enough" and he was too bored with to bother working on any further? Many writers crank out a first draft hurriedly as thoughts come to them, and ...


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When you submit to an agent or publisher, your writing is all they have to go on when forming an opinion of your work. You want to make the best impression that you can. Think of it this way: If they're considering two equally engaging stories, where one will need significant line-editing to fix the grammar, and the other doesn't, they'll want to buy the ...


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While I wouldn't consider "gerunds" (or even adverbs) to be mistakes, if you're worried about your grammar, hire an editor to do a line-edit. Explain (if this is the case) that you're happy with the story and don't want a content edit, but you do want to polish your grammar, structure, word choice, spelling, and so on. Publishers do have editors, but if ...


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Your grammar doesn't need to be perfect in fiction and breaking certain rules is perfectly acceptable so long as you convey the correct meaning. An agent isn't going to turn down a brilliant story because it needs to be proofread. However, if you know full well that there are lots of grammatical errors and it will require significant re-writing at some ...


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Etherpad. It has Commenting PLUS change proposals PLUS attribution Output as plaintext (even better than Markdown for the workflow) Collaboration in realtime with color coding Minimal WYSIWYG A local installation for security



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