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Adding an idea that seemed to work for me. Write in your usual font (by font I mean "times new roman", " Ariel", etc) Change the format of the whole manuscript to a different font preferably with the following properties: A font you never read in, one that is similar to cursive (handwritten). Also change the line spacing if you need. It seems very ...


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As Simon White says, it's a non-issue. If there were only one or two lines on the last page... then it would be a minor issue. You might flag it, but you don't need to change it. The layout person can make a few simple tweaks to pull the extra lines back, or push more lines forward.


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In this context, redoubling your effort means trying harder, but not by any set amount. Maybe 150% of the original effort. At least that's the understood meaning in modern English. If you're speaking the language the word comes from (French), "redoubler" is to double again, or 400% of original. The same is true if you're playing a bidding game (like ...


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Instead of trying to use a derivative of double, you can use the suffix -fold. three·fold three times as great or as numerous. "a threefold increase in the number of stolen cars" There is no real maximum number that can be used for this. You can use ten-fold, one hundred-fold, etc.


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You say you are proof-reading, so you are the copy editor? You should concern yourself with the readability of the text, but not the pagination. In any case, if a novel chapter goes 8 lines into the last page, that is fine.


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"Redouble" is almost always used in the idiom to redouble one's effort, meaning to increase the effort one is exerting. "Double again" has the very specific meaning of This was increased by 100% of the original, to make 200%, and will now be increased by 100% of that, making it 400% of the original. Which one you want to use is dependent on context and ...


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There's nothing---NOTHING!---in the detailed list given by you that's forbidden, if used, just as you described, in a "passing reference." NOR is there any problem with mentioning real businesses or hotels, UNLESS you do so in a derogatory way; such as: "I stayed three nights in the SOUTH NARK hotel, right off Broadway, in New York. And it took me three ...


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As long as you're just making references that don't portray them in a negative light, you're fine for brands and celebrities. Things like Jaguar or Rice Krispies don't really date a work, either. Fictional characters, however, are copyrighted for a long time. So no using Luke skywalker as a character. Your characters can talk about Luke, swing swords around ...


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1) Sherlock Holmes is public domain. No one's going to sue you for it. We all own it. 2) While classics like Sherlock Holmes are safe, referencing pop culture can date your work. Just FYI...


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It's been a few years since the above question was posed. Now, there is at least one system, CriticMarkup, designed to give plain text writers functionality that is similar to Microsoft Word's "track changes" feature. http://criticmarkup.com


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YoungWritersSociety is a great place. It's got a really active community, but it's geared toward younger and less experienced writers - but it still works for the better, elder writers, too.



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