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This site, written from the poet-author's POV is pretty good: http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/getting-a-poetry-collection-published-from-submission-to-the-next-project (Note that this page is just the link page to the content.) This site is targeted more at people using their service, but it has some good practical advice: ...


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Even the most famous and celebrated poets tend to have limited audiences --and you'll never please everyone. Given that, the most important thing is that you produce a book that you are proud of and happy with.


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Book layout is a very specialized field. If I were writing a book of my own, I'd save up the extra money for a layout person, particularly if the book had a lot of tables or illustrations, or if it used a lot of non-standard characters. Rates for layout are currently anywhere from $45 to $85/hr, so the cost of laying out a book depends on the length and ...


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If this is the first book you've sent out, you might be unaware how unusual (and prized!) it is to get any personal feedback from a publisher at all --form rejections and silence are much more common. Given this, any offer to reconsider upon revision should be taken extremely seriously. No publisher ever requests a second look at a manuscript unless they ...


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I had a similar experience over thirty years ago, but it didn't result in a publishing contract. My manuscript was being reviewed by five publishing houses, and the first to reply was a rejection. However, they had some very nice things to say about it and suggested that it was just too long and had too many characters. They recommended that I rewrite it and ...


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That's not a comma splice; that's a statement followed by an elaboration.1 The second does not stand alone, so a semicolon there would be incorrect. This would be a comma splice: It had been a thousand years since the Razzies had known the horrors of the king's might, it was a thousand years since he had sailed across the ocean with his vast armies and ...


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May I recommend an approach I use since I also license my content for reuse: Source - HTML source format is my preference, but you can use LaTex as well Works great for all your distribution formats - PDF, Mobi, Word, etc Google Web Designer - Editor for all major OS's http://www.google.com/webdesigner Love this line from License agreement - You retain ...


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First of all, I wouldn't use LaTeX (unless you're required to do so). LaTeX is great if you want a collegiate-looking PDF, but it's a pain to convert to other formats (I know from experience). I'd recommend markdown or the more advanced reStructuredText. Then all you need is pandoc to convert the document (the added plus is that you can convert rst or md ...


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I use several methods depending on the situation: when a client reviews my work, I supply them with a PDF and ask them to use the Acrobat commenting tools to insert the comments and changes. Then I can go through the list and add checkmarks to the comments I've processed. Acrobat can filter these, giving me a list of comments I haven't done yet. You can ...



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