Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

I would strongly advice against offering a "pre-release sample". Offering a first chapter or two for free to get your readers hooked before they have to pay is a nice touch in my opinion, but providing a portion of your novel before it is all finished sounds risky. What if you realize by the 80% mark that something is horribly broken in the beginning and you ...


8

I assume your students are interested in self-publishing. Traditional publishing is a whole different ball game. Key Factors To Consider Rights. One of the main draws of self-publishing is that you keep all your rights over your work. However, plenty of sub-par services exist which'll be happy to take 'em off your hands. Before posting work anywhere, and ...


6

Question: I have a [...] romance short I’m thinking of publishing, but it’s currently about 1,700 words. At that length, do you think it would work better as a free story on my blog? Or should I still try to sell it? Answer: I have six different stories at that length up for $2.99. And I also have all six in stand-alone paperbacks for $4.99 through ...


5

If you publish the initial chapter, there's one thing you should make damn sure: That the readers are guaranteed to know up front that they are reading only a part of the story. Nothing puts you down more than if you expect to get the full story, and then detect that it's only a part, and you have to pay for the rest. This is true even if the author didn't ...


5

They are all distributors for your book. So for traditionally published authors, the publisher handles distribution- sending your book to stores, Amazon etc. For self publishing, you have to do this yourself. Lulu and Createspace originally distributed only print books, though they also do ebooks now. Kindle Direct Publishing is Amazon's ebook programme. ...


4

Before going ahead with the rest of the answer, please keep in mind that pdf is not usually considered as a true ebook format. Some standards, based on a number of pdf ebooks (technically not standard but convention): Page Size: Usually 6-by-9 inches or 7-by-10 inches (but there is no fixed size. You can even use A4 or smaller; Ebooks larger than A4 would ...


4

Why are you using CSS anyway? I use Scrivener, and I use the inbuilt features to convert to ebook formats. In practice, there are only two ebook formats. Pdf is a terrible formats for eReaders, and I've never heard anyone using it as such. The two used by the biggest sellers (Amazon, B&N, Apple, Kobo etc): Mobi for Kindle. I don't know about Kf8, but ...


3

Short answer: multiple-step and time-consuming/expensive Google eBook formatting and see the hundreds of different methods for doing this. It ranges from long, in-depth methods that would require you to strip your book down to plain text and add semantic information, to supposed 'converters' that will do it all for you. There are 'professionals' who will, ...


3

OK, I don't have any specific numbers, so it's going to be more of a subjective answer, I apologize. Firstly, when self-publishing, you have to keep in mind that you are your own marketer. You sell your own books. Sure, they sell through Amazon, or Smashwords, or Barnes and Nobles, or whichever you choose, but you have to make them sell. I saw people ...


3

There are a few organizations that focus on getting new authors introduced to more readers, the one I am mainly associated with is http://bookhubinc.wordpress.com/ . Basically contact them and say that you're a writer having writen a new free book and would like help getting it known. They normally respond quickly. You don't have to use them or feel ...


2

There's a couple ways you can try to handle this. The bottom line, though, is that ebooks are reflowable content, unlike a print book or a PDF for instance, so you only have so much control over how the content actually appears. Take a look at the this page, which describes the page-break-inside CSS property. If you set this to avoid for your list, it ...


2

You can rent a Mac in the "Cloud" using MacInCloud. They have several pricing plans including pay-per-go (which unfortunately has a minimum charge and automatic recharge). The cost may be prohibitive if you don't expect many (or any) sales. An alternative is to upload your book using Smashwords, which is an Apple-approved aggregator. They'll take a cut of ...


2

TL;DR: Don't bother with Apple iBookstore unless you really, really want to because their market share is very small, albeit not insignificant. Instead, focus on Amazon, B&N and maybe Google eBookstores. You could buy a secondhand Mac but that might be a bit much to invest in just to submit your eBook to Apple. Or, you could use an ...


2

CSS is CSS: if an ebook format uses HTML/CSS, then that part should be the same regardless of the ebook format itself. Of course, not every ebook format will necessarily use HTML or CSS. Yes, a WYSIWYG editor which is actively maintained (in order to support any new formats that come out) will make your life very easy, if it supports everything you need. ...


1

In this link from Jun 2013, they say that in the UK, the total of ebooks sold are 12%. However, Sci-Fi has about 20% of ebook sales. It provides some links in English, but I couldn't find more info for free. Only some research to buy (and I'm not going to pay for it).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible