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I've never heard of Ulysses. I'd suggest you write everything down, even if it contradicts itself. Then you work on fixing it when you edit. Whatever you do, DO NOT BECOME PARALYZED IN A BOG OF DOUBT! Cheers.


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There isn't nearly enough mathematics around here. Let's try some. Consider the extreme case, where every time you write a chapter, or go back and edit a chapter you break the logic of the chapter before it. Suppose your book will be 100 chapters in length and each new chapter or each edit takes up all of your writing time that day. After chapter three, ...


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Every writer has a different process. Here's what works for me. While thinking about the project before I start writing, I make notes about what I want to do and where I want to go. Some people work from an outline, but I never do. I simply work from a feeling about the characters and the story. When I am writing, I make sure to keep a set of notes about ...


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If you are a discovery writer, this is part of your process. Just get it all on the page and keep writing; you'll finish when you finish. However, it is then part of the first draft that you must go back and sort it out from beginning to end and make sure it's a coherent whole. Writing "the good parts" is fun and keeps you motivated. As long as you accept ...


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Like many answers in life: it depends. I'm not sure how Ulysses works, but I imagine it can splice/paste ideas, keep virtual notecards, and whatnot Some writers draw out long outlines and try to roughly stick with them while others rely on stream-of-consciousness storytelling, at least for the first draft. It is also OK to do something in between. ...



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