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7

Does the OneLook Reverse Dictionary work for this? You still need to winnow down your search phrase, but it might work. (Information from this answer.) However, good ol' Google will sometimes do this as well; just type in "word that means" and the rest of a short phrase. For example, here's the search phrase "Word that means separating wheat from chaff". ...


6

OneLook's Reverse Dictionary seems to offer precisely the kind of tool you're looking for. However, I don't know that they're very good - I tried get on a plane, but board came back as result #96, well after slip (#3), touchdown (#50), precession of the equinoxes (#66), and fayez banihammad (#85). From my superficial familiarity with computer language ...


3

The Macquarie Dictionary is usually considered the most reliable source for Australian English words, and Australian usage. There are a range of editions in print, as well as the (paywall) online version. Another option is the Australian National Dictionary, although it focuses on purely "Australian" words and their first usage. Rather than the real ...


3

I've tried the Wiktionary and I really like some aspects of it, like having all the different regionalisms listed next to each other. (eg. 'fanny' has both the benign North American definition and the less-innocent UK version). But sometimes I go to a dictionary in need of an authority. You know... 'Webster's says..." or "According to the OED...", and the ...


3

TvTropes is a good place to find them, if you don't mind some investment of time. Alternatively, a site specific search may give you additional insight: TvTropes loves to abuse cliches and puns, and if a quick google for 'site:tvtropes.org phrase here' showed a whole bunch of results, the chances are fairly good that this is a cliche. Wikipedia has a very ...


2

Reverse dictionaries being what they are[1], often your best bet is to think of a word that sorta-kinda fits the concept — maybe not the best fit, just something in the right ballpark — and then use a thesaurus to find a better word. (Rinse and repeat as necessary.) If you decide to ask on English.SE, make sure you show your work: describe what words you've ...


2

Check out my program ClichéCleaner. It highlights passages in your text that are either clichés, other overly-used common expressions, or phrases of your own that you have repeatedly used within the same document. ClichéCleaner includes a list of nearly 7000 unique clichés and common expressions that are compared against your text. However the actual ...


1

Some of the websites mentioned here can help you to find one word for a complete sentence or a phrase. Please have a look at them : 1) http://www.vedicaptitude.com/?page_id=87 2) http://targetstudy.com/one-word-substitution/ and more...


1

What you remember was possibly one of the DK visual dictionaries, which are brilliantly done and quite memorable. (I have the DK Illustrated Oxford Dictionary on my bookshelf as I write this.) The is also a Facts on File Visual Dictionary, sitting right beside the Oxford.


1

Here's the perspective of an editor who does some writing on the side: It depends on what you need in a dictionary. When editing UK writers, I usually use Cambridge, I think I'd continue to use that or Merriam-Webster when trying to convince a writer, I do not think the word you used means what you think it means. Technical writers or those in other ...



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