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I disagree that a colon does not simulate normal speech. A classic example would be when I enumerate something to my dialog partner: "Hey Joe, we offer the following colours: Gray Blue Yellow." There, maybe even with semicola in a single line: "Hey Joe, we offer the following colours: Light Gray, Dark Gray and Eternal Gray; ...


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The sad truth is that semicolons are slowly dying. NGrams However as one of the few people who still attempt to use semicolons in writing (and a programmer) I sincerely hope they don't die out. Ultimately a lot of it boils down to a lack of proper teaching; teachers these days do not often teach students the correct use of semicolons. In an attempt to stop ...


1

The real answer here is: Whatever makes your message the most clear to your readers. Learn to use punctuation as properly as possible, because this is what people learn at schools. Since they learn it there they tend to understand it as common usage and it's easier for them to gather meaning. And since most people learn to read at school, a common ...


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Linguists have found that semicolons, colons, and even commas, are on the wane in everyday usage, and that many speakers no longer understand the use of a semicolon. Non-writers – and you will see this in emails, forum posts, and other written messages – often do not use punctuation at all, but rather let all "sentences" flow into each other, only putting ...


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"The point of a Horcrux is, as Professor Slughorn explained, to keep part of the self hidden and safe, not to fling it into somebody else's path and run the risk that they might destroy it — as indeed happened: That particular fragment of soul is no more; you saw to that." "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince", J. K. Rowling "Lord Voldemort liked ...


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The real difference about whether or not you use dialog is based in two terms: Narrative Exposition Which one you choose and to what extent will completely alter your story. Here are a couple of drastic examples: Narrative John Robinsky felt very angry and decided to obtain revenge upon his company for the way they had abused him. Exposition ...


1

In most stories, one doesn't necessarily need a lot of dialogue but it sure helps to display the character's personality more than just telling your readers what they did. I think of it as "showing" vs "telling." A short expletive of especially creative invention can go a long way to describe who your character is, instead of using a lengthy sentence to ...


1

It sounds like you don't really have a story yet, but a world. But a story is the journey of a character who wants something. Try one of these: Start with a character who lives in your world. What do they want? How they get it is your story. (If they have everything they want, you don't have a story; take something away from them). OR Start with a big ...


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I notice that you didn’t mention theme among the basic elements you had in place. You didn’t say much with your question, so forgive me if I wander off into speculation. In fact, I’ll toss a couple of ideas out there and hopefully something will stick. Several writer friends of mine and certainly many successful pros are plot-focused, genre writers. ...


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Plot combines all the aspects of a hook (beginning) and a great ending with steps to get from one to the other. Great stories come from conflict. Put your character in a situation that seems nearly impossible to resolve, and then step by step resolve it; adding new challenges along the way. The Middle section is most problematic for you. Keep out of the ...


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Give the characters something unique: It doesn't have to be something mind-blowing or some kind of superpower. It could be something as simple as a toe fetish or not being able to remember dates. Give them an unexpected behavior: The wife of one of them left him and he reacted by ... cleaning the house from morning to night?! What? Give them an ...



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