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1

A few points that got kinda stiff for me as a reader and as a writer were when you split a sentence with a dialogue tag. For example, "I used to do it a lot," I explained, "when I was a kid." "Wow," I said, "no need for that. However, the dialogue you split with action tags was fantastic. "Uh, Paola?" This was the best moment to bring it up. ...


2

You can try to avoid the Internet spelling of things, and it'll come out a little more formal, but I think the disadvantages outweigh the advantages. Consider: "noob" and "n00b" actually mean slightly different things, and "newb" is something entirely different! You lose meaning by conforming to a formal style. Admittedly, the interlocutor is hearing it and ...


5

I strongly oppose drusepth's answer. Slang is spoken language. Internet slang is written language. You cannot speak it. Think about how you would speak to a friend. You are unable to say pwned, l33t or n00b out loud. You will say "owned", "leet" and "noob". So, when you write a representation of spoken language such as dialogue you must use what the person ...


3

My general rule with slang is that if it's in quoted text (e.g. dialogue), it should be spelled colloquially (pwned); otherwise, slang in prose should be written properly, when possible (owned). Just like if you had a southern hillbilly speaking with slang, you would probably quote him saying, "He be talkin' like this'ur," but rarely would you write talkin' ...


0

Using speech tags is alright. As a reader, I developed a sort of blindness for the word "said" and just track who said the line. No reader would complain about seeing too much "said"s.



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