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6

First, show the character - the introduction should present them in detail, following the inevitably boring blather. Once the reader knows the character and their vice, you can start skimming, letting the narrator replace the actual blather ("after ten minutes of introduction and catching up on recent gossip..."). Keep reminding the reader, exposing them ...


3

The answer is easy when the pronunciation of a single letter or acronym is known to your readers. For example, we all had maths in school, we know what what a "variable x" means and how to pronounce it. In a case like this you can use the conventions familiar to all of us and write the variable name as it is written in all the school books of the western ...


3

Honestly, I have no problem with writing single letters or numbers in dialogue, particularly if they are acronyms. All the following look fine to me: "The variable x is greater than the variable y." "I liked the TM1 better." "I drive a Mazda 2." "But there is no MI-6!" "Captain, the Klingons are at 132 mark 47." "Captain's log, Stardate 8130.3." I have ...


2

Remember the law of conservation of detail: When a detail isn't important, don't waste time describing it. When literal speech does not contain any information which is relevant for the plot, get rid of it. You can instead describe the conversation in an abstract summary to convey that the conversation did happen, but the content wasn't relevant. Switch ...


2

I agree with the two other posters and would like to caution you from always using correct grammar for dialogue. When people are talking out loud, they don't use it. Off the top of my head, this is an example: "Something I said?" he asked. "Every time, another complaint," she said. "Try living with yourself sometime," he said. "Comm Ave," she said. ...


1

Adding to the answers already given: 1) If your POV allows it, you can add humor or pathos (or both) by continually interrupting the blathering with the main character's thoughts. Those thoughts can be internal commentary on the inane blather, or juxtaposed seriousness. 2) When people rudely interrupt the blatherer it can be quite humorous. Think Archie ...



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