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6

The dialogue should above all be natural and matching the characters. That means there is no list of "wrong words" in general. Only "per character" - meaning you won't have a junkie punk speaking in elaborate formal language, nor, conversely, a scientist using street slang. The language used should be such, as given character would use normally in given ...


5

Depending on whether the character actually stutters or just rewords mid-thought, you might write: "Lo— I mean, Warden," he amended. "Lor— er, Warden," he amended. "Lo— Warden," he amended. In each case, the M-dash indicates an audible but very short pause, maybe accompanied by a quick head shake or wince or some other tiny ...


3

I recently had this problem, and I accidentally found a way around it. Have one character use the layman's version of the word, or perhaps an incorrect word, and then have another character correct them. My example: "In a town that small -" “Municipality.” interrupted Andrew. “Municipality that small, it would be impossible to..." For 'alpha test' you ...


2

I think that the articles you cite look like very bad advice. I see what they're saying, but I wonder if following these rules will really cause a reader to decide that a story touches them more or makes them realize deeper insights. Okay, seriously -- and I admit up front, I am about to get highly opinionated here: Yes, there's a point in there about ...


1

Suggested strategies: 1) As indicated by other responders, make the argument really about something else more personal. You can get great drama from repressed and/or unadmitted emotions leaking out into ostensibly polite debate. 2) Foreshadow that this argument may be mild now but is going to have dramatic consequences. E.g. one of the characters makes an ...


1

No. Filter words in dialogue don't matter. You can do what you want in dialogue. Would it be cliche to write in a narration that it was raining cats and dogs outside? Yes it would because this is creative writing. Surely you can come up with a better way to describe it raining hard. But if your character runs inside, dripping wet, and exclaims,"Damn. It's ...


1

Most beginning writers forget that their narrator is a person with a character who speaks in a voice and narrates in a style that befits his personality. Whichever words (and grammar and imagery and so on) you use or don't use is determined by the character of your narrator. In literature, no words or expressions are forbidden or unusable in and of ...



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