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4

Never put camera angles/shots in your screenplay, it screams amateur. You can however cheat to create visual clues. Example: INT. PRISON - DAY A pair of shackled FEET shuffle down the hallway.


5

The current fashion in screenwriting is to avoid mentions of camera angles and focus on storytelling, but you can certainly mention POV. Some people do this with a slugline. INT. BEDROOM—DAY BILL'S POV Bill fixes his hair in the mirror. But if you're going to do the trick where a mirror image turns out to be the real one, you don't need to mention POV ...


1

In my opinion, these are essential for fight scenes: Motivation. I want to know why your characters (on both sides) are fighting and why. What are the stakes? What will happen if they lose / win? Is there a danger of severe injury or death to make me care about the outcome? Tactics. Reading "he hit him, and then he hit him back, etc." isn't engaging for ...


0

Technical jargon can be incorporated into the story with varying degrees of success and effect. Unfortunately, there is not a formula to determine if there is too much in your story. In most cases, it is better to leave out the details of all of the technical inner workings, and leave that part up to the imagination of your readers. One way to determine if ...


0

I suggest that you use nerdy-language to build up a sense of authenticity. However, you might not want to use it for all objects. And the ones that you do use, I'd suggest you give a BRIEF explanation about what it is. Read Jurassic Park. It does this well with biological terms... But then again, I know biology very well, so I may be slightly ...


2

First off, +1 to all comments that advise "gobbledygook is fine if you use it correctly" and "gobbledygook isn't gobbledygook if given the right audience." I also think it's important to strike a proper balance between technical and layman's terms. I often find that the Sci-Fi writers I like the best sprinkle jargon in with enough context to where you can ...


2

Read a well-known sci-fi author like Arthur C. Clarke. I'll recommend "Rendezvous with Rama". He'll get away with a lot, by simply stating what stuff is. As mentioned by others, it's not a lazerpistol, it's a zapper or a gun. It's not a "GUI that gets the IP using a Visual Basic Script" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkDD03yeLnU) it's "something I cooked ...


1

Try using real words instead of made up nerd substitutes like "tryhard" and "backstory". People are granted more credibility when others can tell that they're literate.


2

One thing I would suggest is to know your audience and your characters. For example, if you're writing from the perspective of a particular character (either first-person or third-person limited), then you want the following: Your readers to identify with that character in some way, and That character's thoughts, words, and actions, to correspond with his ...


5

The best way is to either become enough of a "nerd" yourself to speak the lingo, or find someone who can help (keshlam mentioned this in comments) The trick with much of the lingo is that subcultures invent such lingo to allow themselves to quickly and succinctly describe things that matter. As a result, such lingo has a tendency to get quite precise. ...


6

Find and emulate a writer you like who uses technology in his stories without resorting to jargon or interrupting the narrative flow. Michael Crichton does an excellent job of this! He writes compelling stories about people faced with the effects of technology. He occasionally uses the prolog to establish some background information. But from there on, his ...


22

Nerdy gobbledygook isn't actually nerdy gobbledygook - they're actually saying things using technical words, acronyms, and abbreviations. It's very similar to medical speech in that way. You'll only sound like a tryhard if you're sticking pseudo technical made up words in that don't actually mean or say anything. The first step is to figure out what ...



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