Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I don't know why your question got voted down; it's a perfectly legitimate question. Most works I read nowadays (I don't know how we can discuss writing without discussing existing works) don't have that much description. It seems most writers nowadays adhere to the school of minimalism or follow the style of the modernists (Ezra Pound, Hemingway, etc). If ...


5

A few guidelines I learned from Dean Wesley Smith and Kristine Kathryn Rusch: Describe whatever the character has an opinion about. This guideline helps me figure out what to describe. If it matters to the character in the moment, it goes in. Describing through the character's five senses makes the descriptions rich and vivid. Whatever you describe, ...


3

I have the same problem --plot is my strength and description is my weakness. I think it corresponds with being a "big picture" person rather than detail-oriented. Something that helps me is to remember that description isn't just decoration, it can do a lot of substantive work. It can foreshadow, echo, or recall plot elements. It can develop a subtext, ...


1

I (sometimes/often) do the total opposite; I barely describe some characters and leave it almost entirely up to the reader to decide what they look like. I may give general descriptions, such as "male", "forties", etc., but that's about it. Why? Well, because I am writing a story and the story itself is what matters most - not what colour the ...


0

Depending on the flair of the writer's technique, the description will vary, but all writers who wish to expose the characters or scenes they are introducing and developing must use an expanse of description - not only does this picture the image in the reader's mind, it allows adaptations of the reader's imagination to rest this image in their thoughts. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included