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Ask a person from the supply dept - how they request supplies from 3rd party companies - raw materials, equipment, machines, whatever your company needs but doesn't manufacture. Phrase your quote request just the same, just exchange the articles you're asking for. In particular, in your situation, there's really nothing wrong about copy&paste to ...


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In my opinion, only describe what you need to describe. And only when you need to. At least that's what I try and do in my writing. I recall in an Isaac Asimov novel, I forget which, he kept back the detail that a particular character had dwarfism until quite near the end but it was crucial to the plot. Until then, the reader assumed, (a dangerous ...


2

There is so far no rule or restriction for placing description of a character in earlier or later chapters of a novel. It is not necessary to portray the appearance of the protagonist in the very beginning of story. In some situation you have to give the same feel to the readers what you are trying to express in the novel. So at least you should provide ...


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I think that you should define your main characters, and especially the love interest, only as much as absolutely necessary. If it is important that the protagonist is male, write that he is male. If not, keep this ambiguous. If it is important that the love interest is thin, write that she is. If not, keep this ambiguous. Why? Because you want as many ...


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The best answer would be depends on the story. One of my favourite writers, Stephen King, does leave a very little info about the characters in their story. I remember, that in his book On Writing, he said, that Carrie was originally described only as shy girl, always having wearied off sweater on. If you keep vague description about the characters, you ...


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The biggest risk you have by describing the physical appearance of your character later on in your story is that your readers' mental image is shattered when you describe your character in detail. This can be quite jarring. The only way you're going to know for sure is when you ask someone to review your novel. Perhaps once you're ready you could ask them ...


1

The transition seems fairly smooth to me, probably because the action doesn't feel like action: It feels like the continuation of the musings in the earlier paragraphs. Maybe this is because we're not seeing the setup, but I think the entire excerpt feels rushed. This is someone who's thinking through reasons why life just doesn't make sense, but I'm not ...


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We teach children not to cross the street on a red light. If they follow this principle, and wait for the green light, they will cross the road safely every time (assuming the drivers keep their end of the deal). As you grow older, your senses develop, and you can tell when it is safe to cross the road, even when the lights are red.


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I don't think this is in any way specific to writing. For example in physics, there are many wannabe-Einsteins who think that if you just claim the previous physicists were wrong and dream up your own theory, you can revolutionize physics. The result are crackpot theories, because unlike Einstein, those people didn't really know the physical theories which ...


6

When to break the rules? When you know what you're doing. Breaking the rules "the good way" always serves some purpose. It's never done "just because". Writing is all about eliciting certain moods and feelings in the reader, and the rules prevent jarring, unpleasant surprises, breaking of immersion, and countless other errors that simply take away from the ...


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(a) Short answer: There are no rules. Read and write a lot to build your intuitive understanding of narration. (b) Long answer: To understand the rules of writing, let us look at language. People learn and speak their mother tongue without ever consulting a grammar or dictionary. In fact, language existed before any grammar was ever written. Now how did ...


2

This is a very difficult topic. But this is something that I've noticed over the years: when a beginner breaks a rule you feel like he has broken a rule, when an expert breaks a rule you feel like he wanted to break that rule. The best example I can come up with is the movie Adaptation. In the movie, the protagonist (Charlie Kaufman) says: Okay. But, ...


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The rules are there to give a pretty good outline of what is good writing and what is bad writing. Breaking a "rule" typically requires doing something else to accommodate it, and this web of complexity typically requires an experienced writer who knows these connections. For example, one rule you might hear would be to stay away from cliches. But there are ...


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This is what I learned the hard way. The rules are there to support you in getting from A to B and do a decent job regardless of skill level. Following a set of tried and trusted rules allows you as the author room to concentrate on the aspects of a story that you find interesting. Following rules is like a less restrictive form of re-telling an established ...



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