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There is no such thing as "vividly descriptive writing". There is, of course, "incredibly annoying amateur writing with lots of extraneous adjectives strung together". When I read amateur manuscripts it is invariably a face palm. What I need to do is write software that can automatically recognize, target and delete adjectives. That would be very useful. ...


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Since it will be too long for a comment, I'll put as an answer. She isn't the same personality, Suzuka. She's in the role of a Crusnik, a powerful being different from her non-Crusnik personality (which was more timid). In the video, though, you see that before we hear her voice, the male character displays shock; he is being overcome with a freezing ...


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It seems to me that there is only way you can create "purple prose". The term itself seems less like an actual definition then words a pundit invented to describe something he recommends for or against. In this case, he is simply recommending that you avoid a certain type of prose that reads as boring. Is my interpretation at least. edit: to answer your ...


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Sometimes purple prose is an attempt to impress the reader with how smart the author is. I work in the software business and I have to do a fair amount of technical writing. And I've very routinely found that if I write something that is simple, clear, and direct, someone else in the company will edit it to make it less easy to read. I recall one time that ...


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You can also have an anthropomorphic approach to description. This makes the thing you are describing have a life of its own. The walls sighed. The door groaned. The chimney belched smoke. The floors shrieked. etc. etc.


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One of the characteristics of the kind of prose you are referring to is a very dull and dry approach, there is often quite unnecessary pompous savant words and an obtuse language, there is also a general miasma of boredomness and triteness, a sure way to spot the culprits in an entirely wholesome and objective way is the length of the sentences used which ...


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Obviously you cannot give the whole impression of the object you want to describe all at once, but have to start somewhere. Where you start and how you proceed from there will depend on what you want to convey to your reader and might be influenced by the following aspects, among others: the character of the narrator the atmosphere of the place the events ...


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Too long for a comment, so an answer: In all of your recent questions you ask about objective rules that you can blindly apply. For example, you'd like to learn which grammatical structure is most readable, and then plan to use that structure, believing your final text will be a readable text. But language is not mathematics, and readable is not the same ...



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