Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

My graduate level creative writing courses worked like this, more or less. You sign up or volunteer to bring in work. You sign up in advance. In classes of 10-18 people, everyone shared work about three times a semester. On your day to bring in work, you make copies for the entire class and distribute. There was always some variation here. Either you read ...


3

An MFA would come in handy when working in the publishing world. A lot of editors for publishing houses have MFAs and even owners of publishing houses occasionally have them. I know at least one of the editors at the primary house I work for has one and I'll be pursuing an MFA myself. Not only does the experience often help editors, it gives the publishing ...


2

What tylerharms describes is similar to my experiences at an undergrad level at a fairly large college. There were 10 to 12 people in the class. We received an assignment (Write a short play, or Write an essay about something personal) and had to turn it in by a specific deadline. The deadlines were rotated so that in each class we were discussing one ...


2

I applied to an MFA program as a side-option last year, and I am about 90% per cent certain that I read this somewhere on the department's site/admissions portal. (The 10% uncertainty comes from not being able to recall where exactly, maybe on a FAQ somewhere). Paraphrased: Our students usually are able to find part time work as editors for ...


2

A good reputation amongst actual recent alumni is the most telling factor, I've found. Most universities' published ratings can be a bit outdated and/or based on criteria that looks more impressive on paper than in the actual classroom. That said, a program's worth is often subjective, relative to what the student is looking to gain. Some programs have a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible