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15

It varies a lot - and by type of writing. I can do casual non-fiction writing fairly quickly, but more structured or formal work takes me longer (not just in the editing, but in the actual writing process). The professional writers I know point out that burning out is a bad thing (as above: 1000 words each day - or even 250 words a day - is a lot better ...


14

Start a Seinfeld calendar. Basically, you have a calendar set up somewhere that you see everyday. Each day you write, fill the date with a big red X, or another distinguishing mark. After a few days you'll have a chain. The chain just keeps getting longer and longer. Dont break that chain. Thats the way to keep pushing yourself to write as frequently as you ...


9

An apocryphal story about Joyce A friend once found him sprawled across his desk, a figure of utter despair. "How many words have you written today?" he asked him. "Seven," the great man answered. "But that’s good for you, isn’t it?" "I suppose so," Joyce answered. "It’s just that I don’t know what order they go in." Copied from here I think ...


6

Inspired by a news post about ohlife I set up a small script that sends me an e-mail message each day asking me about my day. I just reply to that message with my daily journal if I have something interesting to say. This trick (or mind hack) works great for me because: I'm in a position to write my journal when I get the reminder to do it. My journals are ...


6

If you are a skilled writer, the goals you mention in your question may be not unrealistic. (1,2,3,4). Some of the most usable advice I've seen appears in the writing blog of Rachel Aaron. A brief excerpt from the blog follows. I ended up creating a metric, a triangle with three core requirements: Knowledge, Time, and Enthusiasm. Any one of these can ...


6

It depends. Personally, I aim for one to two thousand words a day. I know of one professional writer who goes for three thousand words a day (but, as she pointed out to me, this is her day job).


5

This may be an extremely subjective answer, but i find it easiest to get a chapter or two done, rather than a word count. It means there is a complete section to get a family member to read over, and if there is spare time in my sitting, i can go through and edit it. If you don't finish the chapter, just try finishing it (and the next chapter) the next day! ...


5

20 pages per day is 5000 words per day. That's a lot. That said, here are some ways to increase your daily output: Write for more time every day. Write without editing or even critiquing. You can always critique later, and edit later if necessary. This might end up increasing the total time you spend critiquing and editing, which in turn might eat into ...


4

Pick your problem from the list... Typing speed: If it helps, you can stare intensely at your keyboard while you type and edit later. If you can go at light speed while looking at the keys, do it. Then, later, you'll be able to look up from your typing. When I was twelve (three years ago), I could hit 70wpm if I was looking at my keyboard, and maybe 30wpm ...


4

I don't have the text in front of me so my numbers may not be completely accurate but I can at least give you a general sense of why the number of pages you write each day is a meaningless metric. In Anne Lamott's book on writing, Bird by Bird she notes that the most prolific writers manage to write only one book about every 5-7 years. Regardless of how ...


3

On the extreme side, Lester Dent was able to write a whole Doc Savage novel in about two weeks, perhaps less. We're not talking great literature here, but he is generally considered to have written the best Doc Savage books (all of them were published under the name "Kenneth Robeson", and they came out monthly). They weren't all that long, so figure about ...


3

I used to write a minimum of three pages of freewriting every morning (from The Artists Way) which allows the removal of cruft from our brains and eventually promotes more creativity and more writing.


1

No one can answer that question for you. You need to write every day and find the best wordcount for yourself. As a 4 time winner of NaNoWriMo, I can honestly say that 1667 words a day for me personally is way too much. It's doable, but if I had to go one more day, I'd go insane. 1667 a day burns me out, even without a day job. On the other hand, I've met a ...



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