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I use a variation of Fritz Freiheit's Master Writing Log. It is a LibreOffice spreadsheet (works under excel too) and doesn't have graphs but they're easy to put in. See http://fritzfreiheit.com/wiki/Master_writing_log


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Typically, when dreaming, we don't realize we're dreaming, so the way to write that most closely approximates the actual experience of dreaming is just to write as if it were any other scene, but with the unquestioned alterations to reality and believability that are typical of dreams. Although the character is fooled by the reality of the dream, you ...


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It's okay to publish a book at any age. If it is a good book (or at least "good enough.) Worse come to worse, if you can't publish at age 13, you can try again at age 18 or age 23. A famous writer, Pearl S. Buck published her first book at age 10, I believe.


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Do you dream? If so, what sorts of dreams have you experienced? If not, perhaps reading up on the experiences of others in their dreams may prove beneficial. Also, are you writing in 1st person or 3rd person, or even switching between views to emphasize the dream sequence? How the events are presented will need to be worded differently depending on the ...


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Well, this has a lot of answers, so i'll keep it simple. Most people don't publish their first book, regardless of age. You could be forty, writing a book, and still wouldn't be able to publish it. If it's a good book, obviously you can get it published, no big deal. It's actually pretty impressive. But good writing comes with practice, not with age. Write ...


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Nancy Yi Fan started writing her first book at age seven. At 10, she got it published. It was called, "Sword Bird". I never read it myself, but it got good reviews and was fairly popular. Now she has two more Sword Books published. Three books published before you're twenty is a pretty sweet accomplishment.


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I think in that case you should just let the story unfold on its own. Since you've already got a start, each step you take you should ask yourself what the possibilities are, what may possibly happen next, and don't settle with just one choice. Brainstorm and list out all the possible options for the next action/scene/twist/... in the story. Then you can ...


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Keep in mind cliche isn't necessarily a bad thing. Anything can be whittled down to a cliche if you dissect it enough. Even the best seller books and movies. The difference is doing it in a way that makes it unique, and like user19388 said, there is no magic potion to help you do that. Just write, continue to write, tweak your story a little bit, until you ...


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Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, The Fault in Our Stars, I can go on. There's a lot you can do to make it original. But you need to spend the time to brainstorm. You need to spend the time to write. To fail. To write again. If you're committed, you'll find your way (and your ideas). You may start with a cliche template, and then figure out ways to make it more ...


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You summarize the problem very well when you said: "I can barely get maybe ten or fifteen thousand words in before I completely lose all interest." I really hope you'll reconsider the difficulty you are going through and see that it isn't something wrong with you, but is a very common challenge among most (if not all) authors. Most Common Problem ...


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Looks like you are off the old hyper-focus. ADHD makes it impossible to proceed with anything unless extreme interest breaks through the barrier and produces an immense ability to focus, far beyond regular levels. If at first you could, and now you cannot, you have sunk below the threshold. The challenge is, how to get it back. Maybe it is just a phase. ...


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I'm thinking it would be kind of easier if it was the protagonist experiencing someone else in that situation. In that sense if they were in a situation (for example) where the protagonist was the best friend, of a girl who had just been dumped, not only would you have to describe her crying but the gestures she makes as well as the gestures the protagonist ...


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(I'm going to come at this from a writer perspective, not an ADD/ADHD perspective.) Depends on what kind of writer you are. It's possible you just haven't found the story for you yet. You haven't found the one that really captivates your attention and makes you want to push through. So you may just want to keep trying out books until one keeps you. Unless ...


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I think that if you want to write more, getting back on those meds will be easier; I found these tips for when your on Adderall: Eat essential amino acids, glycemic carbohydrates and healthy fats Exercise is known to release certain hormones that relieve you (but do it as a general activity) Rest for 8 hours


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I've written dream sequences, and remembering, a number of different ways. I think the main thing to focus on is having something that fits with your book. If your book is hard buttoned down realistic, then you could go the same route, or you could go decidedly against that making the dream sequence seem more ethereal. I think the only wrong way to do this ...


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I had a similar problem with my current novel project. The first draft was quite horrible, exactly due to the fact that my characters felt like stereotypes cut and pasted from my literature research. I had several episodes in mind that I read about and wanted to include in the novel - say, for example, the story of a couple in the 60s: The husband is at sea ...


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I'm not a lawyer, but I'll point you in a direction you may want to go. What you are doing sounds like something called "parody." It turns out that "parody" is one of the so-called "fair use" defenses for copying. More to the point, John Adams is not alive to sue you, and no one else can, on his behalf. In your case, you should "make a virtue of necessity" ...


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Doing research for characters can only be good, as it will make sure that they do not break the suspension of disbelief. If you make characters that do not fit with their upbringing, they will seem too fake to be able to relate to. The difficulty with character building is finding a good balance in each character between interesting and believable. A ...


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I am afraid it is the best way how to discourage everybody from reading something like that. I am serious, characters need to be someway interesting, being alive, believable. (I can imagine a story of a writer trying that way and - will fail.)


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Anything "epochal" requires the full range of emotion. "Humor as tragedy" or a farce works very well in such idioms...or as a prelude to something horrific. Nothing like a good joke before one of your characters is suddenly deceased.


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Use of a predictable sequence can bore your audience but can also make them feel smart. There was an article that concluded that audiences preferred knowing the story (http://www.ew.com/article/2015/07/27/trailer-spoilers-southpaw). A predictable plot element is a miniature version of this. The audience knows what is going to happen ("Don't open the closet!")...


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I get the sense that your protagonist is not important enough to the plot. He is instrumental in the development of the two women, but he isn't doing all that much for himself. As such, the hero is clearly a "point of view" character but I'm not convinced that he is a real protagonist. I can think of two ways to fix this. The first is to "make a virtue of ...


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'Two Weeks with the Queen' by Morris Glitzman is a very funny book, but it is about death and grieving. (It doesn't use black humour.) It is sometimes used to help children and teenagers who have suffered a bereavement. The right type of humour in the right position always has a place in a novel.


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Why people don't consider using a search engine before they ask questions is a mystery to me. Using Google, the first search result is a Wikipedia article for through line, which explaines that Konstantin Stanislavsky suggested the concept in his method of training actors, the "Stanislavski system", at the beginning of the 20th century. Using Google book ...


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One of the saddest stories I know, "In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried," by Amy Hempel, is full of humor. (Interesting - it's available online.) The humor is used there like a magician uses misdirection. The narrator and the main character are both funny, and they joke around through the whole piece until the end when things go bad, then the story ...


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In a novel-length work, there is almost always room for some humour. I'd say the trick is to choose the right type, and in the right places. Be the right kind of funny If you've seen it, think of the TV show Breaking Bad. Its subject matter was bleak and often gruesome; its emotional content was utterly brutal; but the writers sprinkled in plenty of ...


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"Sarcasm", "Logical Comedy" completely fits this genre. You know, sometimes when plot gets too serious, you can make a joke or two about how one got saved. Let the characters induce the comedy.


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"Humor" should be taken in context of the whole story. If your story is basically humorous, then "humor" is what one would expect, and would help, not hurt the story. If your story is basically serious, you may have one or two humorous scenes for "comic relief," but "too much humor would detract from the story. From the sound of the question, your story ...


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One of my writing professors is a fellow believer of the notion that everything is cliche. Almost everything has been done before, and redone many times over. The question is, can you write it in a way that your characters are still unique and interesting? Lots of things can be similar, but still different, and entertaining. In comics many characters are ...


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Surprise is the cheapest of literary devices. People often reread their favorite books and re-watch their favorite movies. They would not do so if their enjoyment of them depended on surprise. With effective storytelling our hearts can still be in our mouths for a character at a critical juncture no matter how often we have read the story. If we can enjoy a ...


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There's an easy answer: It depends on the genre. Generally speaking, genre readers (that is, detective fiction, science fiction, fantasy, romance) will expect a certain degree of predictability - you are in control of the degree, knowing that some pleasant twists and surprises are welcome, but something too experimental will probably be received less warmly. ...



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