New answers tagged

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The website http://co-writers.com/ is specifically set up to help people find writing partners. It's not the most active site, but it gets a steady stream of postings, and doesn't charge for usage.


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check out meetup.com most urban areas have several meetup writing groups.


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I would not advise swapping round the languages. Part of the flavour of any story is its setting. If I am reading a book set in Germany or Austria I expect and understand that, for the most part, the characters will be depicted as speaking German, even if it is translated into English for my benefit. I also accept and understand that English will be a ...


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While not a perfect solution, this may help somewhat: Der arme Siegfried stand herum, hörte dem Gespräch der Fremden zu "Ha, der versteht uns doch eh nicht" to demonstrate in english: Poor Siegfried was standing around, listening to the foreigner speaking "Ha, he will not understand what we are saying, that moron" Of course there is always the ...


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There are three issues here: copyright, trademark, and plagiarism. Copyright law explicitly says that you can't claim a copyright to a phrase or slogan. If what you have in mind is some clever turn of phrase or witty line, there's no legal barrier to using it. Quoting classic phrase is generally not considerred plagiarism, as long as you don't imply that ...


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A friend once said: "Every beautiful thought we consider ours." At the age of 13, I used quotations in my writing so often, it felt like I didn't have a single thought of my own. They called me "the walking sutra"... As much as I revere the talent of other writers, I have to say I have outgrown this practice big time! Whenever I try to steal or borrow ...


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In fiction, pretty much everything is allowed legally-wise, including using trademarked catchphrases. If you plan to say something really bad about a famous company, you might wanna cover your posterior by including a disclaimer in the front that it's a work of fiction. EDIT: I'm talking within the body of the text. You can't use a trademark phrase as a ...


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Totally fine in prose writing. Where it gets iffy is in formal writings like cover letters and scholarly essays. You really need a license to do so in these occasions or else it is kind of seen as lazy. But as far as your case in concerned, completely acceptable.


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Everyone has their own process. If you don't, then try one and see how it goes. I suspect I'm in the minority here, but I never outline or make notes. I begin by writing and I see what story emerges from that. Writing scenes reveals who the characters are, how they relate to each other, what they're going to do in the story, etc. Through revision, much of ...


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I don't think it's possible to give a definitive answer to this question. Different people have different styles. Do what works for you. I write non-fiction. (I've got two false starts on novels that I've set aside to work on another non-fiction book.) I try to collect all my raw information in a mass of notes, not necessarily well organized, and dump them ...


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Edit: I reread your post and noticed you wrote that she knew nothing about him. That makes it kind of hard to grieve for a person. Grieving, at least in my opinion, presupposes some kind of connection. But it's hard to have a connection if the other person is completely closed towards you. What I wrote below still applies though. However, rather than ...


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First of all, every main character in the history of the world has to change in a certain way. That's how you know your character has grown. Whether it be coming out of their shell, growing up, or learning new things, your character has to change and learn something at the end of any story. Now, your character can't just change. There has to be buildup, ...


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StoryWars is a pretty new writing site that focuses on building each other's stories. Each chapter is written by several people, before voting commences. Then the winner gets his/her writing as the next installment in the story. Maybe this is what you're looking for?


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I'm not quite sure what you're asking here. Are you looking for a way to come up with exotic species or with how to convey their presence without actually showing them? If it's the later you could try this environmental storytelling and the use of stories within stories. Thomo already mentioned this and it's also something Tolkien did amazingly well. You ...


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Possibly, this might be better off on Worldbuilding. Either way, what do you mean by a feeling of many races/cultures? Even in Tolkien's world, the races did not mix a great deal, nor did people move around on a global scale. You could use a similar mechanism - the main protagonist, being human, has, of course, heard of the other races, but hasn't had a ...


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To me, your question sounds, as if you have trouble showing the gradual development of your character. A good discussion of how to provide well-rounded characters arcs is provided, for example, in Chris Vogler's The Writer's Journey: This was the most helpful book I've ever read about storytelling. It adresses the very essence of what a story is and how ...


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I think the previous answers are better than what I am about to tell you but if it was me writing it I'd give my character a REASON to stop running. I would have my character witness something so horrible s/he would realize that there is no running,that they personally would have to do something about it for the sake of others (or even just him/herself) s/he ...


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First of all, your protagonist almost must change, or there's not much point to your book. If s/he does not at some point stop running and pull him/herself together, your reader will feel like the book is a waste of time. To make it seem not rushed or fake, you need two things: sufficient buildup before the epiphany to give enough space to the epiphany ...


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What do you think the reader will expect? I don't think that when reading your novel, they will think: "Well, he is going to be scared the rest of the novel, he will never do anything, the end." I think, that by creating the conflict, and the scared protagonist, the readers will expect him to not be scared at some point, and do something about the conflict. ...


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The problem here is there actually is no plot. There's a vague sibling context, and everything else seems shoehorned around it. Either we're not being told enough of the plot mechanics to understand it, or the plot doesn't actually exist. IMHO you have two choices: forget the plot and develop the characters further develop the fantastic aspect further, ...


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You could attempt a backstory for the character in a chapter. I wouldn't go for expalining the magical aspect too much, but rather explain the way he solves his problems with his ability and how he overcomes the limitations of the same. It also depends if you're going for "Hard Magic" or "Soft magic" or somewhere in between. Think if you want to approach ...


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Many literary greats have deep chapter titles. They can be as subtly deep as you want but their main purpose is to intrigue and give hints of what may come next. My advice would be to keep them obscure enough so that the chapter content is not too obvious before you read it. Think along the lines of TV series and the individual titles they give to episodes. ...


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It should say something about the chapter, but not the plot. An example of this is that some books I have read have the chapter name be the POV of the character, since they switch a lot. Never have a chapter that will make a reader go back and wonder why it was named what is was. A chapter title should not be to deep. At the very most, it should introduce ...


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If the death is meaningful, keep it. It should have a reason for being there. If it impacts the hero's personality or starts a subplot, or if this is a murder mystery or something of the like, I would recommend you keep it. Also, the reason she died should become apparent very soon. Not to actual cause of her death, but why her death was important, and ...


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That's up to you. Whether you decide to advance the plot in each chapter or not is entirely your call. Your readers may disagree with your decision, but frankly that's their problem. Ultimately, what you write is yours. If your goal is to sell copies, then by all means appeal to the common denominator. If your goal is to convey meaning, not everybody is ...


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KISS is always best. Think simple short names. In any culture there are names which are kind off international sounding and others which require proper pronunciation, use of silent letters, un-western letters, consonant clusters, over 3 syllables… For instance I would easily relate to Saad, Saami, Sabik, Sachin, Saje, Samouet, Sanjay, or Sahir… from ...


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In urban fantasy style fiction with multiple supernatural characters, is it understandable to the reader if race names of each group are a combination of stereotypical species names (such as 'vampire' or 'fairy') with made-up names or regular names that have been altered somehow? A quick example for the sake of my question could be spelling fairy as ...


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How about going with this♪? Possibly with the note raised as superscript. After an initial description it serves as a reminder to the reader.


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The bit "Yet enough of my potential readers are familiar enough with the area to spot made-up things. " leads to the conclusion that you should not do this. Unless you want to invest the necessary time researching and reading about this community, then, it seems a recipe for disaster. If you don't have any experience about something, you will always get ...



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