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While I largely agree with the interpretations in the other answers in regards to Syme's character in the novel, I think you may be able to tie it together with your plan for the internal monologue by portraying Syme as both a subversive and a genuine party supporter. Essentially, he would just be Winston, as seen from the outside. Setting your portion of ...


2

I have and have always had many close female friends. I don't see what's so special or "difficult" about these relationships, they function just like any friendship I have with a man or boy. If you want to write about a male-female friendship, then just write a male-female friendship. No, I don't constantly wonder wether or not I would like to have sex ...


0

In addition to all the other excellent advice that was already given, I would like to point out that in our society (Western culture) violence towards children is a very strong taboo, so much so that in some countries it is even forbidden by law for parents to physically punish their children. While children do become the victims of all kinds of violence in ...


-2

One possibility is: Just Do It. Write the story where they always relate to each other as friends or co-workers, and the issue of romance just never comes up. I've had many female co-workers over the years whom I have never thought of as potential romantic partners, and to the best of my knowledge none of them were pining away for me. Two: Give a specific ...


-1

I don't want to be too cynical, but... being politically correct in just the right way. It is old news in U.S. politics that, as is said in some of the many constellations of African national cultures, "It takes a village to raise a child." (Or, if you aren't reading this in history books, "It takes a village.") I don't know which of the many constellations ...


0

Depends on the story and setting. Have them advise each other on romantic problems. Make her older or more mature than he is, which creates a gap that can close during the series. (You could try it the other way around, but sweet young thing and worldy wise older guy is still a trope, albeit an out of date one).


2

Close male-female relationships that aren't romantic are challenging even in real life, let alone fiction, but they do exist. Assuming the pair isn't related, neither of them is gay, and they're relatively the same age, your readers will begin to long to see them together, just like their friends in real life would be likely to do. One way of dealing with ...


0

Off the top of my head, CJ Cherryh's Morgaine saga (female mage, male assistant), three or four books, no romance. (removing this per @what's comment below) ETA so wow, it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought it was to find examples. Almost every story I can think of at the moment has either two people of the same gender, one gay protagonist, or two ...


0

I'm a developer... and a prolific writer, including novelist. There are precious few writers who can pay the bills by writing alone. I sure can't. My advice would be to remain a developer, and expand into writing, where the rule is, as another answer would have it, read an awful lot, and write an awful lot. The "Writer's Digest" series of books is worth ...


1

In combination with "lampshading" the unsolved mystery in dialogue, as mentioned in the answers by Jay and Dale Hartley Emery, you can demonstrate that your unanswered question is intentional by putting it right at the beginning or right at the end of the story, i.e. at the parts of the story where readers know that the writer is most likely to have ...


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That absolutely depends on your story. If it's important for the story, readers will be curious. But then, don't disappoint them ;-)


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Although I would hesitate to say you can't do this or that, the character of Syme doesn't come across as a potential subversive, and find the idea he was plotting to overthrow the government to be fairly far fetched. While it's possible he was a subversive pretending to be loyal, his intelligence suggests that he would have been more successful in acting ...


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All people have a natural curiosity. The mystery genre usually preys on that curiosity, giving people a hypothesis and asking them one or several questions based on that hypothesis. This is the 'mystery'. Then they try to solve the said mystery in their minds and this involves them in the story a great deal. Because it makes the story personal for them. ...


1

I am a young writer too! :) I've been creating a series with my best friend we are both young and I we found an author that have invested in us and has taken the time to really get to know us <3 What I've learned so far is to not fall down when people think your too young ;) one of my favorite Bible verses is: "Don't let anyone look down on you because ...


5

I think what makes anything matter to readers is: it matters to a character that readers care about it matters to the character for reasons readers can identify with


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You might need to clarify your question: I'm not sure exactly what you mean. But maybe: (a) As Dale Emery says, have the character's comment on it. If, for example, you never mention what Fred does for a living, the reader may not even notice that you don't bring it up. Or if it's obviously relevant, the reader may wonder if the author made a mistake by ...


2

You wrote: A theory that i had was that he was pretending to be loyal but was actually plotting to overthrow the government. Would this be a plausible storyline considering what happens in the book? I suppose anything is possible, but that is not really at all how he is written. I think we are supposed to take the character at face value. In any ...


0

The moment after the boy begins to fall, he might realize the inevitability of his imminent death. That point, while he is still in mid-air and has only begun to fall, might be a logical place to break off. In most modernist novels, as well as in contemporary commercial fiction, nothing is included that does not somehow advance the story. Corollaries ...


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So first of all, don't know what your story is about, writing style, etc. That said: I dunno if you've read Lord of the Flies, but there is an excellently handled scene there where someone falls to their death. It does describe the outcome - brains on a rock - but it's a quick, short description. However, because we have grown to know the character, the ...


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Near the end of the book, have a character comment on it, and perhaps express some kind of emotion about the mystery. If I remember right, Stephen King did that in The Colorado Kid. This trick—have a character comment on it—is useful whenever you want to make it clear that you are aware of something that may bother the reader. Not only unresolved story ...


1

One thing that usually annoys me greatly in film is when there is a group dialogue and everybody is practically finishing each other's sentences without any pause. It's like one brain and 3 mouths rattling. The dialogue becomes unreal. How about having two people talk interactively, until there is a transition to a third person (the camera pans). Anna ...


0

Not knowing what your "purpose" of the story is, it's hard to give any solid advice. You could ask yourself: How can I best describe the death such that it supports my purpose? You can always scratch it later. It might be a chance to discuss something seemingly unrelated. For example, when you fall, your entire life flashes by. This is an opportunity to ...


0

The thing with novels is that they're really squishy in form/shape until you decide what you want to do with yours. So as for "should I show the death"...what do you like to read? Are you turned off by explicit scenes? Or do you feel that without showing the scene, something important to your story is lost? As others have said, often the shape your book ...


0

Just a small suggestion: I appreciated how the Hive Mind was treated in the Ender's Game sequels. The main character is an individual, but he interacts with an Hive Queen, showing efficiently how such a thing would think. My memory is not what it used to be, but I think we mostly read about the Queen in Xenocide, the third book.


1

It'll depend on what impression you wish to convey; If it's the horror of the boy's death, don't. It'll have more impact, and you won't distract the reader with details he might not want to know, or can perfectly imagine himself. On the other hand, if you're writing on the boy's point of view, you might want to convey his last moments to the reader. In ...


2

We can't tell you what should happen in your story. (In fact, questions asking what to write are off-topic here.) But perhaps you can ask yourself a few questions: If the scene is described graphically, in gory detail, what effect will that have on the reader? Will it help to further the story, or will it cause the reader to put the book down in disgust? ...


0

Autobiographical writing is difficult, because you know exactly what happened. You can't fudge it. Plus, you're writing about emotions and psychological issues, which are notoriously difficult to get right, even in fiction. Combining the two, it isn't surprising that you are having trouble. So, don't stress. Keep at it. Here is an exercise you can ...


1

Sir, I don't wish to be harsh but you deserve honesty. Concerning yourself with world-building issues should not be your focus now. If English is your language of choice, your skills with the written word are not at the level they need to be. Your writing contains many grammatical errors that book-readers will not tolerate. You must first improve your ...


3

One thing I can say is, do not stress yourself out. That would be rule number one. Other than that, the medium does matter. Writing directly on a forum may put on the pressure for you. Best to dose it correctly, neither too high nor too low. Different subject matter will require different levels of effort. Writing a light-hearted message about an average ...


1

In a script this is easy as all dialogue is simply tagged. But that comes across rather artificial in a novel. For this example I'd make it a bit more narrator-centric. Looking back and forth between Anna and Carl, observing and interpreting both gestures, facial expressions and spoken words. Reacting both to the conversation at hand and from the history, ...


4

There's no hard-and-fast rule for how often to attribute dialogue, but the general goal is clarity. If readers are finding a section unclear, it should be reworked. In this example, I'd just add a few more tags. "Roses and a dead body?" Anna wrinkled her fine nose. "I don't see the connection." "And they came from Paris," I said. "How did it end ...


5

The only works that are truly original are by people who've never had any contact with other people. Every work has inspiration from other works, or ideas that are present in other places. Many excellent works don't even have novel plots. As for legal repercussions, "ideas" are not protected by law. Only the expression of the idea is protected by copyright. ...


2

What are your goals? Are you writing for entertainment, for yourself? If so, write what you want. Write the history, write a series of vignettes from the perspective of a prehistoric ghost of your world, write a new alphabet and language for each creature - write whatever makes you happy. If your goal is publication, ask yourself what kind of publication ...


0

I have the same problem and still do. Readers are normally drawn to characters of setting and unique history...at least at first. Its better to develop the character in the early part of the book and then start incorporating all the new cool world building. Brandon Sanderson calls this World Builders Disease, you have it bad. As mention write a really cool ...


3

If you write a history, it will likely be of interest only to yourself (or as preparation for your book). That's not necessarily a reason not to write it. JRR Tolkien put years of effort into world-building for his books, which is likely a key reason for their continued popularity. If you do go ahead and write your narrative now, don't make the mistake of ...


5

In many (maybe most) cases over-research is a distraction our minds create to make us believe we are working on a project that we really don't want to write for some reason. It could be that we are afraid to write it because we have this beautiful idea of what we want and we are unsure if we could ever write it that well. The Best Advice The best thing ...


1

The first thing you should ask yourself is whether or not the additional description helps to further the story. If it helps the reader get a better sense of the setting or mood of the scene, then you should consider adding it. However, if you are only adding it to increase the amount of content, then definitely don't do it. Your second example does do a ...


1

It's a balance. When I read the first version, it just barely verges on being "too sensational", but it works. The second version offers an improvement of sorts, but phrases like "That's right" which Acknowledge how sensational/confusingly disparate the events are, instead of just letting the reader realize that for herself, are deleterious. I.e.: know how ...


0

your voice is to some extent a composite of the voices you read. Read lots of different authors of all different heritages, occupations, styles, and subjects. It's like eating a variety of healthy foods, or solving a bunch of different types of problems: you pick up a lot of handy tricks for your repurposing/improvement.


1

If the novel is good enough to get published, it won't matter how old you are. You'll just be that much cooler. I've been trying to get published since 12, like you—well actually 11—and I'm 17 now, still sans dice, as they say. I hope you have more luck. Don't ever give up. And maybe brush up on your homonyms ("too" vs "to"—though that's minutiae).


2

Also check out And Then We Came to the End, by Joshua Ferris. It's second-person, and it works. Where you seek an effective hive-mind, Ferris sought an effective Office — the collective murmurings of a bunch of coworkers. The use of second-person enables an omniscient narration — all of the events are well-known gossip, water-cooler talk — while still ...


6

The very first story I ever wrote was written from the perspective of a collective mind. So, as they say on /b/, this question is very relevant to my interests. I would approach the concept of an intergalactic hive mind from the perspective of sociology, neuropsychology, and biology. A hive of bees can be considered as a single organism: only the queen can ...


5

Here's a thought: would the infected members of the population even be aware that there is a hive mind of which they are a part? Sure, they experience extreme empathy and are subconsciously driven to act in ways that benefit the whole, but perhaps there is an individual experience that is largely oblivious to the organizing structure in which it is ...


5

David Brin's Uplift series has the traeki/Jophur, which are physically connected hive minds of stacked rings. Each ring is nominally a separate entity; the distinction between traeki and Jophur is the presence of a so-called 'master ring', basically an overriding personality which controls the other parts of the hive mind. As the species is only one of the ...


6

A different slant on things, but Ayn Rand's Anthem has a non-supernatural hive mind (collectivism gone mad, I guess) and she shows it by using collective pronouns even for individuals. So instead of "I" she uses "we", even when there's only one character involved. I hate the book, but the pronouns were interesting. You might also want to check out Ancillary ...


4

(This might get good answers on WorldBuilding SE also.) I think you have to decide, from a storytelling viewpoint, how these people communicate. Does each individual have his/her own thoughts but others pop in and out like everyone is always in the same room and thinking out loud? Do you only hear the thoughts of people within X geographical distance? Or is ...


1

Yes, you can write a book even though you're young. No, there is no guarantee that it will become widely read, or that it will sell a lot of copies. There are two ways to learn something: 1) Learn from someone who has done it before (and achieved the result you want to have). Usually you end of with similar results to your mentor. 2) Do it ...


2

Yes, it's perhaps borderline possible to publish, but keep in mind that your market will become tangible if it includes people who are intrigued by foreign cultures and interaction between them, but not specifically multilingual, or perhaps multilingual but not necessarily in your specific languages. People are rarely as multilingual as their region. ...


1

I thought I would throw my two cents into the mix. I wrote my first book(non-fiction) when I was about 16-17 (I am 20 now.) and decided to self-publish it with the help of a few friends and family members. Short answer: Yes. You can publish your book. Long answer: Take your first book as the biggest experience of your writing career. It's unlikely that ...


1

There are many books out there that have become best-sellers because their authors were young! Early genius as well as an "authentic voice" (instead of having adults speak for the young) are two of the strongest selling arguments in the media today. If your book is as well written as that of an adult author, yours will be the one the publisher buys. But it ...



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