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4

There's a contradiction in the visual imagery. "Flame" and "spring" are not very compatible as metaphors for emotion. A spring is not generally a very fierce body of water, unlike a raging river or a maelstrom or whatnot. Visualizing a spring erupting is a little odd, to me. I could see a bubbling spring of cool, fresh water being contrasted with a steaming ...


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Like @elburz, I also thought the spring was a real spring in the earth. However, the real point of confusion for me was that I would not readily identify a "flamy spring... dormant in me" as a sign of overflowing passion. I feel to properly get this idea across, more elaboration would be needed, a la: Those days mining in the depths of West Virginia have ...


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No, my first read, I thought the spring was a real spring in the Earth, like a geiser, because right before you're talking about real mining. Maybe try something like: Those days mining in the depths of West Virginia have released the flamy springs that had lain dormant in me since my first day on Earth.


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I could suggest the Water! trilogy by Gael Baudino, but it's not well-known and I found the experimental format exhausting. Still, Your Mileage May Vary. In the three books (O Greenest Branch, The Dove Looked In, Branch and Crown) she kept switching not merely narrator and POV, but the entire narrative style: parts were standard narration, then parts were ...


3

As long as you label the chapters with the name of the POV character, you're fine. George RR Martin famously has like a dozen POV characters per 700-page book. At least one that I remember had to take on a new identity, so her POV chapter name changed from A to B. I just finished a Patricia Briggs novel with 20ish chapters. Eighteen are in the first person, ...


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As others here have mentioned, you want to show, not tell--have your smart, clever, insightful and thoughtful guy do smart, clever, insightful and thoughtful things, rather than just dictating a description. That said, if you can't think of smart, clever, insightful and thoughtful things for your character to do, here's a way to cheat: think of some people ...


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If you want to learn about plotting fairy-tale stories I recommend you to read "Morphology of the Folktale" by Vladimir Propp. It is a study that dissect the different elements of the folk tales from examples and present a common structure composed by 31 "functions". It is easy to structure your tale after that schema. You can have a bit of it by reading ...


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As I mentioned in my comment above, the Aarne-Thompson classification, specifically the section on fairy-tales, may be useful to you. A handy summary can be found on Wikipedia. It classifies stories by theme and gives common examples which are likely to be familiar to you. It also lists lots of fairy-tales that have become forgotten in recent years, which ...


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You are confusing a traditional fairy tale with the Disney version of it. The traditonal fairy tale does not "show how girls should follow their dreams". They either show how disregarding common contemporary moral standards leads to a tragic end, or how acting in accordance with morality leads to a happy end. Cinderella does not get the prince because she ...


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They typically: Fall in love with one another, hate each other at first, get lied about, always have misunderstandings, almost die, are betrothed to each other or someone else, involve a witch, have an evil/good stepmother, princesses are either helpless or more macho than the man hero, they try to quit being royal and go gallivanting off with peasants, ...


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Oh, it's easy! What you need is a villain! First, think up a reason, why someone wouldn't want the princess to meet the prince. What is it in that connection, that someone might hate? Any reason? Knowing the reason, think of means of keeping the two apart. Lies? Betrayal? Poisonous, controlling relationship? Dependence? Guilt trip? Force? Dark magic? Then ...


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The main con is fear of corporate lawyers if they think you're portraying them negatively. I am not a lawyer (nor a writer or publisher of fiction), but my impression as a reader is that minor mentions don't provoke their wrath but if your plot hinges on, say, a horribly-malfunctioning vehicle, you might not want to name a brand. The main pro, on the other ...


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My feeling is that unless the brand name plays a critical part in your story, don't use it. You don't want to risk the wrath of corporate lawyers unless you absolutely must. Why build your entire story around "do you eat the cookie part of the Oreo or the cream?" and then have Nabisco refuse to give you permission, so you have to rewrite it as "chocolate ...


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To develop story for any novel, first you need to have a start and an end points. Now the whole story and the characters in it will be moving according to this final goal point. You can add as many characters as you want but one condition they need to support your story and shouldn’t go beyond your perception of the story because this will confuse the ...


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Yes to the first! Emphatic no to the second. If I'm on a roll, I'll keep writing until I run out of words. In order to start writing, I have to make a plan and stick to it, otherwise I'll get distracted and forget. I also have to purge my mind of the idea of "writing mood" because if I wait until I'm in the mood, I end up writing nothing. Setting aside ...



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