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Doing research for characters can only be good, as it will make sure that they do not break the suspension of disbelief. If you make characters that do not fit with their upbringing, they will seem too fake to be able to relate to. The difficulty with character building is finding a good balance in each character between interesting and believable. A ...


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You summarize the problem very well when you said: "I can barely get maybe ten or fifteen thousand words in before I completely lose all interest." I really hope you'll reconsider the difficulty you are going through and see that it isn't something wrong with you, but is a very common challenge among most (if not all) authors. Most Common Problem ...


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Typically, when dreaming, we don't realize we're dreaming, so the way to write that most closely approximates the actual experience of dreaming is just to write as if it were any other scene, but with the unquestioned alterations to reality and believability that are typical of dreams. Although the character is fooled by the reality of the dream, you ...


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I've written dream sequences, and remembering, a number of different ways. I think the main thing to focus on is having something that fits with your book. If your book is hard buttoned down realistic, then you could go the same route, or you could go decidedly against that making the dream sequence seem more ethereal. I think the only wrong way to do this ...


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I think in that case you should just let the story unfold on its own. Since you've already got a start, each step you take you should ask yourself what the possibilities are, what may possibly happen next, and don't settle with just one choice. Brainstorm and list out all the possible options for the next action/scene/twist/... in the story. Then you can ...


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Keep in mind cliche isn't necessarily a bad thing. Anything can be whittled down to a cliche if you dissect it enough. Even the best seller books and movies. The difference is doing it in a way that makes it unique, and like user19388 said, there is no magic potion to help you do that. Just write, continue to write, tweak your story a little bit, until you ...


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I had a similar problem with my current novel project. The first draft was quite horrible, exactly due to the fact that my characters felt like stereotypes cut and pasted from my literature research. I had several episodes in mind that I read about and wanted to include in the novel - say, for example, the story of a couple in the 60s: The husband is at sea ...


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Looks like you are off the old hyper-focus. ADHD makes it impossible to proceed with anything unless extreme interest breaks through the barrier and produces an immense ability to focus, far beyond regular levels. If at first you could, and now you cannot, you have sunk below the threshold. The challenge is, how to get it back. Maybe it is just a phase. ...


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(I'm going to come at this from a writer perspective, not an ADD/ADHD perspective.) Depends on what kind of writer you are. It's possible you just haven't found the story for you yet. You haven't found the one that really captivates your attention and makes you want to push through. So you may just want to keep trying out books until one keeps you. Unless ...


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I think that if you want to write more, getting back on those meds will be easier; I found these tips for when your on Adderall: Eat essential amino acids, glycemic carbohydrates and healthy fats Exercise is known to release certain hormones that relieve you (but do it as a general activity) Rest for 8 hours


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Anything "epochal" requires the full range of emotion. "Humor as tragedy" or a farce works very well in such idioms...or as a prelude to something horrific. Nothing like a good joke before one of your characters is suddenly deceased.


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Use of a predictable sequence can bore your audience but can also make them feel smart. There was an article that concluded that audiences preferred knowing the story (http://www.ew.com/article/2015/07/27/trailer-spoilers-southpaw). A predictable plot element is a miniature version of this. The audience knows what is going to happen ("Don't open the closet!")...


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I'm thinking it would be kind of easier if it was the protagonist experiencing someone else in that situation. In that sense if they were in a situation (for example) where the protagonist was the best friend, of a girl who had just been dumped, not only would you have to describe her crying but the gestures she makes as well as the gestures the protagonist ...



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