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4

First of all, your protagonist almost must change, or there's not much point to your book. If s/he does not at some point stop running and pull him/herself together, your reader will feel like the book is a waste of time. To make it seem not rushed or fake, you need two things: sufficient buildup before the epiphany to give enough space to the epiphany ...


4

I personally find it a little odd when authors go out of their way not to call something what it is. If you have an undead entity that sleeps in a coffin, hates sunlight, and drinks blood, why not call it a vampire? If it's because the word "vampire" is cliche, why is the creature itself not cliche as well? That being said, there are a few ways around using ...


3

The bit "Yet enough of my potential readers are familiar enough with the area to spot made-up things. " leads to the conclusion that you should not do this. Unless you want to invest the necessary time researching and reading about this community, then, it seems a recipe for disaster. If you don't have any experience about something, you will always get ...


2

I have never felt that the pacing was wrong in any book I read. I have read books that contained boring parts that I skipped; for example, lengthy backstory, especially the worldbuilding backstory in fantasy, or endless rumination on the part of the characters in a love story. I am interested in the protagonists and what they do, so everything that is not ...


2

I don't think it's possible to give a definitive answer to this question. Different people have different styles. Do what works for you. I write non-fiction. (I've got two false starts on novels that I've set aside to work on another non-fiction book.) I try to collect all my raw information in a mass of notes, not necessarily well organized, and dump them ...


2

While not a perfect solution, this may help somewhat: Der arme Siegfried stand herum, hörte dem Gespräch der Fremden zu "Ha, der versteht uns doch eh nicht" to demonstrate in english: Poor Siegfried was standing around, listening to the foreigner speaking "Ha, he will not understand what we are saying, that moron" Of course there is always the ...


1

I would not advise swapping round the languages. Part of the flavour of any story is its setting. If I am reading a book set in Germany or Austria I expect and understand that, for the most part, the characters will be depicted as speaking German, even if it is translated into English for my benefit. I also accept and understand that English will be a ...


1

Describe the effects, particularly where the effects in space without the presence of air resistance/friction differ from the familiar effects in an atmosphere where friction slows things down. Thucydides' answer to your question in Worldbuilding SE gave several possibilities, e.g. "Kinetic energy weapons will go until they run into something." Since your ...


1

Possibly, this might be better off on Worldbuilding. Either way, what do you mean by a feeling of many races/cultures? Even in Tolkien's world, the races did not mix a great deal, nor did people move around on a global scale. You could use a similar mechanism - the main protagonist, being human, has, of course, heard of the other races, but hasn't had a ...


1

To me, your question sounds, as if you have trouble showing the gradual development of your character. A good discussion of how to provide well-rounded characters arcs is provided, for example, in Chris Vogler's The Writer's Journey: This was the most helpful book I've ever read about storytelling. It adresses the very essence of what a story is and how ...


1

What do you think the reader will expect? I don't think that when reading your novel, they will think: "Well, he is going to be scared the rest of the novel, he will never do anything, the end." I think, that by creating the conflict, and the scared protagonist, the readers will expect him to not be scared at some point, and do something about the conflict. ...


1

You could attempt a backstory for the character in a chapter. I wouldn't go for expalining the magical aspect too much, but rather explain the way he solves his problems with his ability and how he overcomes the limitations of the same. It also depends if you're going for "Hard Magic" or "Soft magic" or somewhere in between. Think if you want to approach ...


1

Many literary greats have deep chapter titles. They can be as subtly deep as you want but their main purpose is to intrigue and give hints of what may come next. My advice would be to keep them obscure enough so that the chapter content is not too obvious before you read it. Think along the lines of TV series and the individual titles they give to episodes. ...


1

That's up to you. Whether you decide to advance the plot in each chapter or not is entirely your call. Your readers may disagree with your decision, but frankly that's their problem. Ultimately, what you write is yours. If your goal is to sell copies, then by all means appeal to the common denominator. If your goal is to convey meaning, not everybody is ...


1

KISS is always best. Think simple short names. In any culture there are names which are kind off international sounding and others which require proper pronunciation, use of silent letters, un-western letters, consonant clusters, over 3 syllables… For instance I would easily relate to Saad, Saami, Sabik, Sachin, Saje, Samouet, Sanjay, or Sahir… from ...


1

In urban fantasy style fiction with multiple supernatural characters, is it understandable to the reader if race names of each group are a combination of stereotypical species names (such as 'vampire' or 'fairy') with made-up names or regular names that have been altered somehow? A quick example for the sake of my question could be spelling fairy as ...


1

How about going with this♪? Possibly with the note raised as superscript. After an initial description it serves as a reminder to the reader.



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