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17

For Cory Doctorow it has attracted a great deal of attention to his work that he would likely not have received otherwise. If he has twenty times as many readers, but the proportion who pay for the text they read drops from, say, 70% to 10%, there is still about three times the turnover. Is it good for you? Some considerations: If you care about ...


11

I'd be hard pushed to think of any other well-known authors who do this at present but I think it may become, as they say, a thing. Here's my perspective. Kindles and the like are becoming more and more popular, so electronic distribution of books is becoming easier. The author has two enemies, the enemy of the popular author is piracy or thievery, people ...


9

Creative Commons licenses are about sharing your work. The basic right you grant with one of these licenses is, that every noncommercial user can copy your work and give it to others, even over filesharing. Other than that, CC-licenses have some restrictions, that can be applied: BY (attribution) - the creator has to be credited (all CC-licenses include ...


4

The fact is, you don't write books for money in science or IT: from the pure financial point of view, it's worthless: you'll spend months or years of work while gaining not too much from sales as the author. Instead, writing books is a good way: to become popular, to show your deep knowledge in a specific field. In both cases, Creative Commons only ...


4

That's a tricky question because the Creative Commons license allows a high degree of freedom. That means, there are lots of Creative Commons license flavors and you can check them better in their very page. Basically, when you choose the Creative Commons license, you choose also -- among other things -- if you: Allow or not people changing your work ...


4

Citing from your link: Share Alike — If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one. Yes, you have to release it under Creative Commons. Best places are the beginning and the end of the book. I would split it. I.e. mentioning at the beginning the license and ...


3

Howard Aiken said: Don't worry about people stealing an idea. If it's original, you will have to ram it down their throats. As a beginner writer, your challenge is to get people to notice you and take your ideas seriously, rather than someone steal from you. So feel free to share your ideas. Its not the ideas that are important, but how you implement ...


3

You can sell any content created by you, regardless of the copyright license (as long as you have not sold or given the rights away). Be aware that under a Creative Commons Attribution license, so can any one else. You might be looking for a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license. Attribution license: ...


3

Do you mean something like Project Gutenberg? You should read the legalese for copyright issues, though.


2

There is StoryTimed, and Protagonize both of which my sister recommends, which are the closest sites I could find to what your looking for.


1

As a writer, I can't think of anything more damaging - especially for young writers - than to be inundated with editorial contributions from others. The editorial process is a one-to-one correspondence in which the relationship between the writer and the editor is paramount in terms of calibrating the importance of the feedback. The idea that the feedback ...


1

TL;DR: You must use and attribute the Creative Commons source in the exact same manner you would any other copyrighted source. That means you can’t claim the content creator’s work as your own or redistribute it in its whole for money. But citing it with attribution or any other form of Fair Use is a-ok. If you’re not sure if your use would be deemed Fair ...



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